Occasional Paper Series

The Center for Social Concerns at the University of Notre Dame is an academic institute committed to research in the areas of Catholic social tradition and community-engaged learning and scholarship. The Occasional Papers Series was created to contribute to the common good by sharing the intellectual work of the Center work with a wider public. It makes available some of the lectures, seminars, and conversations held at the Center. The papers in the series are available for download free of charge; as long as proper credit is given they can be used as any other academic reference.

Issa, Teacher of Solidarity

Author(s): Clemens Sedmak, Felicia Johnson O’Brien, and Leslie Eid
2017, 1

In 2016, the Center for Social Concerns sponsored a workshop called “CST and the Idea of the University.” Felicia Johnson O’Brien presented on the story of her daughter’s life as an example of how the Center for Social Concerns enacted Catholic Social Tradition. Her presentation, included in the second section, inspired the development of this occasional paper.

Community, Reciprocity, and Collaboration: Reflections on Catholic Social Teaching’s Notions of Subsidiarity and Participation

Author(s): Mary Beckman
2016, 2

This paper poses two applications of Catholic social teaching’s concepts of subsidiarity and participation to academic community engagement. The first pertains to the very general use of the term community. The second refers to a distinction between reciprocity and collaboration. 

Principles in Action: Tracing Catholic Social Tradition in Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program Courses

Author(s): Susan Sharpe
2016, 1

The national Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program anchors hundreds of college and university courses that examine crime and justice from a range of disciplinary perspectives, and through a pedagogy that fosters dialogue between students from a college campus and people who are incarcerated. While Inside-Out pedagogy is secular in nature, one can see principles of Catholic Social Tradition laced into its design. This paper opens with a brief description of the Inside-Out model and then traces, first in the model and then in this author’s particular Inside-Out course, a range of Catholic Social Tradition principles: human dignity, the common good, solidarity, participation, subsidiarity, and rights and duties.