Spring 2018 Community-Based Course Guide

COMMUNITY-BASED COURSE OPPORTUNITIES

The Center for Social Concerns offers the following kinds of community-based courses:

Experiential Learning (EL) classes put students in direct contact with some aspect of the issues being studied in their coursework. The off-campus area offers sites for learning, but students don't necessarily engage in service.

Community-Based Learning (CBL) courses give students the opportunity to contribute to the community beyond the campus. Their experiences are integrated into class like a reading assignment, providing them with an additional text for consideration during class discussions and in written assignments.

Community-Based Research (CBR) involves students in an investigation of a question of concern to a non-profit community organization. The results of the study are intended to assist the organization.

SPRING 2018 COURSE INDEX

Click on department name to view departmental course listings and descriptions.

 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS

AFRICANA STUDIES

AFST 43700 (CBL) Youth Empowerment, Literacy, Urban Schools

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 13184 (CBL) History University Seminar

AMST 30171 (CBL/EL) The Digital Newsroom

AMST 30220 (CBL/EL) Covering America

AMST 30465 (CBL) Youth Empowerment, Literacy, Urban Schools

AMST 30467 (CBL, EL) History of American .Indian Education

AMST 30761 (CBL) Prisons and Policing in the US

AMST 30813 (CBR) Home and Dome

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 30036 (CBL/EL) Design Research Practices

ANTH 33302 (EL) Animal Encounters

ANTH 33314 (sec.2 CRN 29380) (sec. 1 CRN 29381) (EL) Immigration Global Perspective

ANTH 43318 (EL) Ritual Studies

ANTH 60800 (CBR) Ethnographic Methods for Peace Research

ANTH 63314 (EL) Immigration Global Perspective

ANTH 63315 (EL) Animal Encounters

COLLEGE SEMINARS

CSEM 23102 (sec. 21-22) (CBL) Religious Violence

CSEM 23102 (sec. 31-32) (EL) Police Cultures

ART, ART HISTORY, AND DESIGN

DESN 20203 (CBL/CBR/EL) DESN Matters: Intro, DESN Think

DESN 20204 (CBL/EL) Design Research Practices

DESN 40100 (CBL/EL) VCD 8: Social Design

DESN 40201(CBL/EL) ID: Collaborative. Design Development

DESN 60201 (CBL/EL) ID: Collaborative Design Development

FILM, TELEVISION, AND THEATRE

FTT 30129 (CBL/EL) The Digital Newsroom

FTT 30130 (CBL/EL Covering America

GALIVAN JOURNALISM PROGRAM

JED 30129 (CBL/EL) The Digital Newsroom

JED 30130 (BBL/EL) Covering America

GENDER STUDIES

GSC 40522 (CBL) Prisons and Policing in the U.S.

GSC 40567 (Optional CBL) Feminist and Multicultural Theologies

GSC 60522(CBL) Prisons and Policing in the U.S.

GSC 60555 (Optional CBL) Feminist and Multicultural Theologies

HISTORY

HIST 30861 (CBL) Prisons and Policing in the U.S.

HIST 33613(CBL) History of Am.Indian Education

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

LAST 30004 (EL) Immigration Global Perspective

MUSIC

MUS 20691 (CBL/EL) Wind and Percussion Pedagogy

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 20813 (CBL) Religion, Identity & Social Justice

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 35901 (CBL/CBR) Internships

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 23096 (CB/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Understanding Mental Illness

PSY 23271 (CBL/EL) Autism Spectrum Disorder IW

PSY 23852 CBL/EL Social Concerns Seminar: L'Arche Community

PSY 23855 (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten

PSY 33685 Social Factors & Sustainability: Effects of the Built Environment on Health & Well-Being

PSY 43271 (CBL) Autism Spectrum Disorder IW

PSY 60685 Social Factors & Sustainability: Effects of the Built Environment on Health & Well Being

PSY 61382 (EL) Child Practicum II

PSY 61384 (CBL) Adult Assessment Practicum II

PSY 61386 (CBL/EL) Practicum II

PSY 61388 (CBL) Practicum IV

PSY 61390 (CBL) Practicum VI

PSY 61394 (CBL) Marital Therapy Practicum

PSY 61397 (CBL) Practicum VIII

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

LLRO 13186 Literature University Seminar

ROIT 10102 (sec. 1 CRN 20943) (sec. 2 CRN 20274) (sec. 3 25406) (sec. 4 CRN 20513) (sec. 5 CRN 25407) (sec.6 CRN 30909) (EL) Beginning Italian II

ROSP 20201 (sec. 1-10) (CBL/EL) Intermediate Spanish I

ROSP 20202 (sec. 1-6) (CBL/EL) Intermediate Spanish II

ROSP 20460 (sec.1-2) (EL) Spanish for Medical Profession

ROSP 20810 (sec. 1-2) (CBL) Community-Based Spanish: Language, Culture, and Community

ROSP 30051 (CBL) Community-Based Learning: Once Upon a Time

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 33001 (CBL/EL) Sociology, Self Catholic Social Tradition

SOC 33458 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Mexico-U.S. Border Immersion Seminar

SOC 45000 (CB/CBRL) Sociology Internships

THEOLOGY

THEO 20625 (CBL) Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice

THEO 20643 (CBL) The Askesis of Nonviolence: Theology and Practice

THEO 30657 (CBL) Theological Perspective on Poverty and Health

THEO 33933 (CBL) Summer Service Learning: Cross-Cultural Learning Program 

THEO 33936 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins

THEO 33938 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues International

THEO 33950 (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

THEO 33951 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: U.S. Health Care

THEO 33952 (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Social Change

THEO 33963 (CBL/EL) Social Concern Seminar: Church Social Action

THEO 33967 CBL/EL Social Concern Seminar: Migrant Experience

THEO 33968 (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: L'Arche Community

THEO 33970 (CBL/EL) Global Issues

THEO 40632 (CBL/EL) Heart’s Desire and Social Change

THEO 40810 (Optional CBL) Feminist and Multicultural Theologies

THEO 60408 (EL) Ritual Studies

THEO 60698 (CBL/EL) Common Good Initiative Germany/Austria

THEO 60823 (Optional CBL) Feminist and Multicultural Theologies

WRITING AND RHETORIC

WR 13200 (EL) (sec. 1-5) Community Writing and Rhetoric

 

SUPPLEMENTARY MAJORS, MINORS, AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TRADITION

CST 20625 (CBL) Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice

CST 20643 (CBL) The Askesis of Nonviolence

CST 30657 (CBL) Theological Perspective on Poverty and Health

CST 33301 (CBL/EL) Sociology, Self, Catholic Social Tradition

CST 33458 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Mexico-U.S. Border Immersion Seminar

CST 33933 (CBL/EL) Cross Cultural Learning Program 

CST 33936 (CBL/EL) Summer Service Learning: Kinship on the Margins

CST 33938 (CBL/EL) Summer Service Learning: Social Issues International

CST 33950 (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

CST 33951 (EL) Social Concern Seminar: U.S. Health Care

CST 33963 (CBL/EL) Social Concern Seminar: Church Social Action

CST 33967 (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experience

CST 33968 (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: L'Arche Community

CST 33970 (CBL/EL) Global Issues

CONSTITUTIONAL STUDIES MINOR

CNST 40404 (CBL) Prisons and Policing in the U.S.

EDUCATION

EDU 70120 (CBL) Cultural Influences on Children's Lives

EDUCATION, SCHOOLING, AND SOCIETY

ESS 20208 (EL) Exploring Learning in Informal Environments

ESS 23250 (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten

ESS 30214 (CBL/EL) Sociology, Self, Catholic Social Tradition

ESS 30611 (CBL) Tutoring in the Community

ESS 33362 (sec. 1-2) (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten

ESS 33613 (CBL) History of American Indian Education

ESS 40263 (CBL/EL) Autism Spectrum Disorder IW

ESS 40610 (CBL) Prisons and Policing in the U.S.

ESS 43203 (CBL/EL) Youth Empowerment, Literacy, Urban Schools

HESBURGH PROGRAM IN PUBLIC SERVICE

HESB 33101 (CBL/EL) Restorative Justice

HESB 34093 (EL) Washington DC Internship

HESB 40104 (CBL) Prisons and Policing in the U.S.

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

IDS 33100 (EL) Immigration Global Perspective

POVERTY STUDIES

PS 35002 (CBR) Experiential Learning-Internship

PS 43000 (CBR) Capstone Seminar: Poverty Studies

SUSTAINABILITY

SUS 20010 (sce. 1-3) Sustainability: Principle & Practice

SUS 33302 (EL) Animal Encounters

 

MENDOZA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

ACCOUNTANCY

ACCT 40660 (sec. 1-2) (CBL/ EL) Tax Assistance Program

ACCT 40670 (sec. 1-2) (CBL/EL) Tax Assistance Program

ACCT 40790 (CBL) Accounting and Reporting for Not-for-Profit Organizations

ACCT 70691-01 (CBL/EL) Income Taxation/International Individuals

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION—SC

BASC 20200 (sec. 1-4) Principles of Management

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, ANALYTICS, AND OPERATIONS

ITAO 40660 (sec. 1-3) (CBL/ EL) IT Project Management

ITAO 70930 (EL) Lean Six Sigma

MANAGEMENT

MGTO 20100 (sec.1-4) Principles of Management

MGTO 30310 (sec. 1-3) (CBL) Innovation and Design Thinking

MARKETING

MARK 30120 (CBR) Marketing Research

MARK 40100 (sec. 1-3) Strategic Marketing

MICROECONOMIC ANALYSIS

MBAE 70634 (EL) Strategic Planning for Growth

 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

CIVIL ENGINEERING

CE 35620 (CBL/EL) Community-Based Engaged Design Project

CE 40702 (CBL/EL) Senior Design

CE 45610 (CBL/EL) Engineering for International Development I

CE 45620 (CBL/EL) Engineering for International Development II

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

CSE 20600 (sec. 2-4) (CBL/CBR) CSE Service Projects

CSE 40424 (CBL) Human-Computer Interaction class

CSE 40600 (sec. 4) (CBL/CBR) CSE Service Projects  

LAW SCHOOL

LAW 70726 (CBL) Applied Mediation

LAW 70728 (CBL) Applied Mediation II

LAW 70730 (CBL) Immigration Externship Instruction

LAW 70736 (CBL) Lawyering Practice Instruction

LAW 75721 Sec. 1 (CBL) Economic Justice Clinic I

LAW 75721 Sec. 2 (CBL) Community Development Clinic I

LAW 75723 (CBL/EL) Economic Justice Clinic II

LAW 75724 (CBL) Intellectual Property and the Entrepreneurial Law Clinic

LAW 75733 (CBL) Public Defender Externship

LAW 75734 CBL/EL) Immigration Externship

LAW 75736 (CBL/EL) Lawyering Externship Fieldwork

LAW 75800 (CBL/EL) Appalachia Externship

LAW 75908 (CBL/EL) Intercollegiate Athletics Externship

 

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

BIOS 40450 (CBL/EL) Clinical Research Rare Neglected Diseases

SCIENCE (NON-DEPARTMENTAL)

SC 33902 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Science Policy Ethics

SC 41171 (CBL) Instrumentation and Science Education

SCIENCE PRE-PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

SCPP 46397 Directed Readings-Poverty Medicine

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND VALUES

STV 33302 (EL) Animal Encounters

STV 33902 (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminars: Science Policy Ethics

 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

ARCH 40312 Soc. Factors & Sustainability: Effect of the Built Environment on Health & Well-Being

ARCH 41121 Design VI

ARCH 53411 History of American Architecture 1630-1915

ARCH 60312 Social Factors & Sustainability: Effects of the Built Environment on Health & Well Being

 

CENTERS AND INSTITUTES

CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS

CSC 23855 (CBL/CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten

CSC 33001 (CBL/CBR) Social Change Fellows

CSC 33300 (CBL/CBR) Home and Dome

CSC 33458 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Mexico-U.S. Border Immersion Seminar

CSC 33900 (CBR) Advocacy for the Common Good

CSC 33902 Social Concerns Seminar: Science Policy Ethics

CSC 33933 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Internship: Cross-Cultural Learning Program 

CSC 33936 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins

CSC 33938 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues: International

CSC 33950 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

CSC 33951 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: U.S. Health Care

CSC 33952 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Topics in Social Change

CSC 33958 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Ethics, Justice, & Health

CSC 33963 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Church Social Action

CSC 33967 (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experience

CSC 33968 CBL/EL Social Concerns Seminar: L'Arche Community

CSC 33970 CBL/EL Global Issues

CSC 33972 CBL/EL Restorative Justice

CSC 33973 CBL/EL Social Concerns Seminar: Realities of Race

CSC 33974 Prison Writing

CSC 33998 Social Concerns Seminar: Understanding Mental Illness

CSC 36991 (sec. 1-3) (CBL/CBR/EL) Directed Readings

CSC 60698 (CBL/EL) Common Good Initiatives - Germany/Austria

CSC 63001 (CBL/EL) Transformation Through Teaching

CSC 63950 (CBL/CBR/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

CSC 63953 (EL) Civic Engagement & Social Responsibility

CSC 63970 (EL) Global Issues - Graduate

CSC 66693 Directed Readings - Common Good Initiative

CENTER FOR STUDIES OF LANGUAGE AND CULTURES

CSLC 63001 (CBL/EL) Transformation Through Teaching

ECK INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL HEALTH

GH 63300 (CBL/CBR) Home and Dome

GH 68551 (CBL/CBR) Capstone Research

GH 60612 (CBR) Advance Qualitative Methods

INSTITUTE FOR LATINO STUDIES

ILS 20912 (CBL) CBL: Language, Culture and Community

ILS 33701 (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Border Immersion

ILS 33967 (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experience

KROC INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACE STUDIES

IIPS 20729 (CBL) The Askesis of Nonviolence

IIPS 30927 (EL) Immigration Global Perspective

IIPS 33202 (CBL/CBR) Advocacy for the Common Good

IIPS 33203 (CBL/CBR) Home and Dome

IIPS 33702 (CBL/EL) Sociology, Self, Catholic Social Tradition

IIPS 40921 (CBL) Prisons and Policing in the U.S.

IIPS 50703 Restorative Justice

IIPS 50705 (Optional CBL) Feminist and Multicultural Theologies

IIPS 60800 (CBR) Ethnographic Methods for Peace Research

IIPS 63205 Restorative Justice

IIPS 70211 (Optional CBL) Feminist and Multicultural Theologies

LIU INSTITUTE FOR ASIA AND ASIAN STUDIES

ASIA 30305  (EL) Immigration Global Perspective

 

GRADUATE SCHOOL

DOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTS

DMAB 83104 (EL) Ritual Studies

MASTER OF GLOBAL AFFAIRS

MGA 60702 (CBR) Ethnographic Methods for Peace Research

MASTERS IN SACRED MUSIC

MSM 63103 (EL) Ritual Studies

 

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

SPRING 2018 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS

 

 

AFRICANA STUDIES

 

AFST 43700 (CBL) / AMST 30465 (CBL) / ESS 43203 / ILS 40004 (CBL/EL)
Youth Empowerment, Literacy, Urban Schools
McKenna, Maria Greene, Stuart
Credit Hours: 3

This course examines youth experiences in a changing urban landscape affected by gentrification, school choice, and disinvestment in low-income minority neighborhoods. We will examine how youth make sense of their lived environments, develop a sense of identity within the context of family and community, and struggle to find safe spaces where they can flourish. To understand key concepts in the course, we will read studies that focus on youth empowerment and the extent to which rich literate experiences and art provide youth with multiple opportunities to develop a sense of personal agency that can foster civic participation and action. To ground our critical analysis of urban landscapes, students will participate in an offsite community-based learning (CBL) project with local youth through a partnership with the Neighborhood Resource Corporation, Notre Dame's new Center for Arts and Culture (http://artsandculture.nd.edu/), and the Robinson Community Learning Center. Please note: Additional out of class time will be required for this class.

 

 

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 13184 (CBL)
History University Seminar
Kathleen Cummings
Credit Hours: 3
An introduction to the seminar method of instruction that explores the major methodologies of the historical discipline and which accents the organization and expression of arguments suggested by readings in historical topics.
 
AMST 30171 / JED 30129 / FTT 30129 (CBL/EL)
The Digital Newsroom
Victoria St. Martin, Richard Jones
Credit Hours: 3
Building on the skills acquired in Fundamentals of Journalism, this practicum course is centered around students preparing stories, photos and videos for The Observer, the university's independent, student-run newspaper. Students will acquire real-world experience in reporting, writing, and using their digital journalism skills by covering live news events on campus and in the surrounding community. Pre-requisite: Fundamentals of Journalism.
 
AMST 30220 / JED 30130 / FTT 30130 (CBL/EL)
Covering America
Richard Jones
Credit Hours: 3
The course is a practical and conceptual exploration of the journalistic issues involved in reporting on topics of national interest. This is an advanced reporting course in which students will build on their digital and multi-platform journalism skills and learn to produce stories for audiences nationwide. The capstone assignment requires traveling to the site of an ongoing national story during Spring Break; the resulting stories, photos and videos will be published on a student-produced website. Please note: There are no additional costs for students in this course; all travel costs will be covered for any student who is admitted to the course. Admission to the course by permission only.
 
AMST 30465 / AFST 43700 / ESS 43203 /ILS 40004 (CBL/EL)
Youth Empowerment, Literacy, Urban Schools
McKenna, Maria Greene, Stuart
Credit Hours: 3
This course examines youth experiences in a changing urban landscape affected by gentrification, school choice, and disinvestment in low-income minority neighborhoods. We will examine how youth make sense of their lived environments, develop a sense of identity within the context of family and community, and struggle to find safe spaces where they can flourish. To understand key concepts in the course, we will read studies that focus on youth empowerment and the extent to which rich literate experiences and art provide youth with multiple opportunities to develop a sense of personal agency that can foster civic participation and action. To ground our critical analysis of urban landscapes, students will participate in an offsite community-based learning (CBL) project with local youth through a partnership with the Neighborhood Resource Corporation, Notre Dame's new Center for Arts and Culture (http://artsandculture.nd.edu/), and the Robinson Community Learning Center. Please note: Additional out of class time will be required for this class.
 
AMST 30467 (CBL, EL) / ESS 33613 (CBL) / HIST 33613 (CBL)
History of American Indian Education
Brian Collier
Credit Hours: 3
This course blends the History of Education and American Indian History and is open (by invitation only) to students interested in action research on these two topics. The course may include an opportunity to collaborate on a project with a school that is part of the Native mission network schools and may include travel to a Native community. The course is by invitation only as it has an outcome opportunity of a conference in September 2016.
 
AMST 30761 / AFST 40711/ CNST 40404 / ESS 40610 / GSC 40522 / GSC 60522 / HESB 40104 / HIST 30861 / IIPS 40921 (CBL)
Prisons and Policing in the U.S.
Pamela Butler
Credit Hours: 3
Scholars and activists use the concept of the ?carceral state? to describe the official, government use of policing, surveillance, and mass imprisonment to exercise control over society. This course examines the histories, cultures, politics, and economics of prisons and policing in the United States, in order to determine how the U.S. carceral state has been a factor in the social construction of race, gender, and citizenship. We will study the genealogy of the U.S. carceral state -- beginning with the surveillance embedded in the earliest practices of slavery and settler colonialism, tracing its development through the 19th and early 20th centuries, and concluding with the rise of the modern prison industrial complex. We will then focus on contemporary U.S. prisons, policing, and surveillance, using case studies including the ?war on drugs,? immigrant detention, sex-crime regulation, and police violence. Finally, we will consider alternatives to prisons and policing, as we learn about academic research and activist movements working to end state and police violence, abolish prisons, and create opportunities for restorative justice. Over the course of the semester, students will learn about the historical development and ongoing maintenance of the carceral state, using an intersectional framework that highlights the ways in which prisons and policing have both shaped, and been shaped by, race, gender, citizenship, and economics. Along the way, students will ask and address such questions as: How does the U.S. carceral state function as a tool for social control? What histories, policies, and ideologies underlie the carceral state? How have individuals and organizations worked to transform or abolish the carceral state? How have art and cultural production been used to normalize and/or critique the carceral state? And can we imagine a world without prisons or police?
 
AMST 30813 (CBR) / CSC 33300 / GH 63300 / IIPS 33203 (CBL, CBR)
Home and Dome
Wood, Danielle Sisk, Matthew
Credit Hours: 1
This introductory seminar will provide an overview of Community-Based Research (CBR) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as part of a data collection project with a handheld device. CBR supports democratic processes, as it engages academic researchers and community partners together in addressing community challenges. Our project will be geotagging and creating a data layer in a South Bend neighborhood. The focus will be on vacant land and property condition for the purpose of facilitating our community partners in identifying, prioritizing, planning, and measuring the impact of their improvement projects. Students will participate in shared learning with faculty, students, and community partners about South Bend, community development, GIS, and the CBR process through readings, discussions, and the hands-on data collection.
 
 
 
 

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 30036 / DESN 20204 (CBL/EL)
Design Research Practices
Anne-Marie Conrado
Credit Hours: 3
With an orientation towards problem identification and the translation of research insights into implications informing the design process, students will learn how to develop a research plan and deploy an array of research methods including interviews, observation, shadowing, contextual inquiry, participatory observation and co-creative development. The course combines lecture with studio practice, with student teams engaging in human-centered, project-based work, sponsored by outside corporate organizations and non-profit social entities. This course is offered every semester and is open to Collaborative Innovation Minors and Design Majors.
 
ANTH 33302 / ANTH 63315 / SUS 33302 / STV 33302 (EL)
Animal Encounters
Natalie Porter
Credit Hours: 3
How do animals relate to non-human animals across cultures? Does culture make a difference in how humans relate to animals and the natural world? What are the roles that animals play in different societies - as food, as religious figures, as companions, as kin, as laborers? From its origins as a discipline, anthropology has examined human-animal relations in a variety of social and geographic settings. This course will review some of the classic examples of cross-cultural relations with animals, and bring these examples into conversation with current debates about race and classification, animal ethics, biotechnology, and food politics. Students will engage with texts, films, and other media from anthropology as well as philosophy, history, and feminist science studies. We will approach these materials from an anthropological perspective that focuses on how our diverse and dynamic expressions of identity and culture shape, and are shaped by, how we engage with other species - whether as beings to think with, live with, love, kill, and/or consume.
 
ANTH 33314 / ANTH 63314 / IIPS 30927 / ASIA 30305 / LAST 30004 / IDS 33100 (EL)
Immigration Global Perspective
Maurizio Albahari
Credit Hours: 3
How do people in immigrant-receiving countries shape their attitudes toward immigrants? What are the differences between refugees and other migrants? How is immigration related to urban "immigrant riots?" And what can anthropological studies of borders and national policies tell us about the transnational world in which we live? We will examine these and related questions, and more generally the causes, lived experiences, and consequences of migration. We will acquire a sound understanding of migration in its social, political, legal, and cultural facets. Fieldwork accounts from countries of origin and from the U.S., Europe, Australia, and Japan will enable us to appreciate both global and U.S. distinctive trends. Rather than merely learning a collection of facts about immigrants, we will address how migration intersects with gender and class, the mass media, border enforcement, racism, the economy, territory and identity formation, and religion.
 
ANTH 43318 / ANTH 63318 / THEO 60408 / DMA 83104 /  DMA 83104 (EL)  
Ritual Studies
Peter Jeffery
Credit Hours: 3
Ritual is the most powerful medium of communication, since it can make use of language, performance, symbolism, architecture? anything humans can do. Ritual can be found everywhere? in religion, politics, marketing, entertainment. In this hands-on course we will learn how to research the ways people use or avoid ritual: how and why they embrace or reject liturgical reforms, invent new rites or revive old ones, cross or respect picket lines, wear funny hats at sports events, fight over the planning of the high school prom, or go out for a smoke during the sermon? and how ritual shapes culture and is shaped by culture. Learning by doing, we will be initiated into the academic study of symbolism, narrative, myth, memory, community, and culture, using social science techniques that include participant observation, semi-structured interviewing, focus groups, writing and coding field notes, film criticism, and more.
 
ANTH 60800 / IIPS 60800 / MGA 60702 (CBR)
Ethnographic Methods for Peace Research
Catherine Bolten
Credit Hours: 3
In this course, students will learn to use methods, insights, and techniques of ethnographic fieldwork in order to conduct research in conflict and post-conflict settings. We will investigate topics such as researcher identity and access in the field, research design, bias and ethical considerations, interview techniques, participant observation, writing fieldnotes, coding and analysis, and writing. This class is designed to prepare students for a field experience, therefore the course requires students to formulate and carry out a project in the local setting as the primary focus of learning.
 
ANTH 63314 / ANTH 33314 / IIPS 30927 / ASIA 33314 / LAST 30004 / IDS 33100 (EL)
Immigration Global Perspective
Maurizio Albahari
Credit Hours: 3
How do people in immigrant-receiving countries shape their attitudes toward immigrants? What are the differences between refugees and other migrants? How is immigration related to urban "immigrant riots?" And what can anthropological studies of borders and national policies tell us about the transnational world in which we live? We will examine these and related questions, and more generally the causes, lived experiences, and consequences of migration. We will acquire a sound understanding of migration in its social, political, legal, and cultural facets. Fieldwork accounts from countries of origin and from the U.S., Europe, Australia, and Japan will enable us to appreciate both global and U.S. distinctive trends. Rather than merely learning a collection of facts about immigrants, we will address how migration intersects with gender and class, the mass media, border enforcement, racism, the economy, territory and identity formation, and religion.
 
ANTH 63315 / ANTH 33302 / SUS 33302 / STV 33302 (EL)
Animal Encounters
Natalie Porter
Credit Hours: 3
How do animals relate to non-human animals across cultures? Does culture make a difference in how humans relate to animals and the natural world? What are the roles that animals play in different societies - as food, as religious figures, as companions, as kin, as laborers? From its origins as a discipline, anthropology has examined human-animal relations in a variety of social and geographic settings. This course will review some of the classic examples of cross-cultural relations with animals, and bring these examples into conversation with current debates about race and classification, animal ethics, biotechnology, and food politics. Students will engage with texts, films, and other media from anthropology as well as philosophy, history, and feminist science studies. We will approach these materials from an anthropological perspective that focuses on how our diverse and dynamic expressions of identity and culture shape, and are shaped by, how we engage with other species - whether as beings to think with, live with, love, kill, and/or consume.
 
 
 
 

COLLEGE SEMINARS

CSEM 23102 (sec. 21-22) (CBL)
Religious Violence
Nicholas Russo
Credit Hours: 3
“Then God said: ‘Take your son, your only son Isaac, whom you love, and go to the land of Moriah, and offer him there as a burnt offering on one of the mountains that I shall show you.’” (Gen 22:2) “Now go, attack the Amalekites and totally destroy everything that belongs to them. Do not spare them; put to death men and women, children and infants, cattle and sheep, camels and donkeys.” (1 Sam 15:3) “From [Jesus's] mouth comes a sharp sword with which to strike down the nations, and he will rule them with a rod of iron; he will tread the wine press of the fury of the wrath of God the Almighty.” (Rev 19:15) These and countless other troubling sentiments are found in the sacred texts of the world’s major religions and they have been used to justify violence. Indeed, according to one sociologist, “violence is inherently fused within the sacred”—in other words, religion and violence go hand in hand. Does God desire human sacrifice? Did God really command wholesale slaughter of innocent people? Should the faithful pray for the annihilation of their enemies? What relevance, if any, should they have for people of faith who read them today? Is violence inherent in religion? Students in this course will examine, debate, and discuss the phenomenon of religious violence from its historical origins to its enduring legacy in the world today. Our exploration will cover a variety of “texts” (scriptures, liturgies, art, music, literature) using a variety of methods (historical criticism, literary criticism, social scientific, etc.) over several time periods.
 
CSEM 23102 (sec. 31-32) (EL)
Police Cultures
Eric Haanstad
Credit Hours: 3
In breaking headlines, news feeds, television dramas and embattled cities, police are defended as a protective necessity and denounced as a social problem. This paradox of police can be approached anthropologically by investigating the interaction between different cultures of police throughout the world and the role of police in different cultures. Since nation-states are continually defined by their capacity for the legitimate use of force within their borders, police cultures are an evocative lens to examine the interplay of state security and cultural order. Police and social order are entwined in the cultural contexts of the regions where they historically emerge. In addition to examining US and European police contexts, this course also highlights the region of Southeast Asia, from the Thai and Filipino police forces "professionalized" by the United States, to the Burmese military government's contemporary transformations, to the ongoing state consolidations in Cambodia. An understanding of local and transnational social control is critical to the understanding police cultures whether looking at the history of colonialism through the development of local constabularies or international campaigns against crime, drugs, and terrorism. In this course, we will identify global patterns of police practice, while exploring the occupational worldviews of local police cultures. Examining these cross-cultural zones of police practice will promote a greater understanding of security, violence, race, media, and a myriad of other phenomena illuminated through the "police" concept.
 
 
 
 
 

ART, ART HISTORY, AND DESIGN

DESN 20203 (CBL/CBR/EL)
DESN Matters: Intro, DESN Think
Anne-Marie Conrado
Credit Hours: 3
Traditionally, design has been used to connote the process by which the physical artifacts of the objects and communications around us come into being. But over the last decade, design has come more and more to describe not only the development of objects but the process by which one shapes the interactions and experiences of people with the systems, services and organizations around us. A deeply human approach to problem solving, design thinking highlights one's ability to intuitive This course will follow a series of overlapping modules that will introduce the student to the various iterative steps employed in the design thinking process and becoming familiar with the tools and methodologies employed. The course will feature a hybrid seminar format with lectures and case studies followed by hands-on exercises and practical applications of the theories in the form of team projects. At the conclusion of the course, students should be able to articulate the tenets of the design thinking process and apply those methodologies to problems of a variety of disciplines from science and engineering to business and the liberal arts.
 
DESN 20204 / ANTH 30036 / (CBL/EL)
Design Research Practices
Anne-Marie Conrado
Credit Hours: 3
With an orientation towards problem identification and the translation of research insights into implications informing the design process, students will learn how to develop a research plan and deploy an array of research methods including interviews, observation, shadowing, contextual inquiry, participatory observation and co-creative development. The course combines lecture with studio practice, with student teams engaging in human-centered, project-based work, sponsored by outside corporate organizations and non-profit social entities. This course is offered every semester and is open to Collaborative Innovation Minors and Design Majors.
 
DESN 40100 (CBL/EL)
VCD 8: Social Design
Neeta Verma
Credit Hours: 3
MATERIALS FEE This advanced course in visual communication is for students to understand social advocacy within both a global context (India) and local context (South Bend). Students understand their role as designers/collaborators/catalysts through real life experiences. Students from diverse discipline are encouraged to come together to create a multi-disciplinary cohort that focuses on 'blue-sky problems' that combines and delicately balances strategic thinking with innovation. During the initial part of the course, in July 2017, students will travel to India for 3 weeks to work with students from India and then return here to commence the course during the Fall semester. Working with students from India, the goal would be to understand social problems within a new paradigm and socio-economic parameter of a rapidly evolving country and its pluralistic culture and returning to Notre Dame with renewed and re-energized perspectives on those very same issues to examine and address them locally. DESN 20101 (VCD1) is recommended, but not required.
 
DESN 40201 / DESN 60201 /ANTH 40201  (CBL/EL)
ID: Collaborative. Design Development
Scott Shim
Credit Hours: 3
This cross-disciplinary course will develop and harness useful innovation through an association of expertise from business/marketing, management entrepreneurship, chemistry, engineering, anthropology, graphic design, and industrial design. Collaborating teams of graduate and undergraduate students will engage several product development cycles, beginning with an identification of need or opportunity and concluding with comprehensive proof of concept, tests of function, specified manufacturing processes, and an appropriately resolved, aesthetically pleasing product or system. All collaborative team members will be engaged throughout the research and developmental process. Each participant will share in rotating leadership responsibilities, providing direction within their specific areas of expertise and in the context of a sequential course outline.
 
DESN 60201 / DESN 40201 /ANTH 40201 (CBL/EL)
ID: Collaborative. Design Development
Scott Shim
Credit Hours: 3
This cross-disciplinary course will develop and harness useful innovation through an association of expertise from business/marketing, management entrepreneurship, chemistry, engineering, anthropology, graphic design, and industrial design. Collaborating teams of graduate and undergraduate students will engage several product development cycles, beginning with an identification of need or opportunity and concluding with comprehensive proof of concept, tests of function, specified manufacturing processes, and an appropriately resolved, aesthetically pleasing product or system. All collaborative team members will be engaged throughout the research and developmental process. Each participant will share in rotating leadership responsibilities, providing direction within their specific areas of expertise and in the context of a sequential course outline.
 
 
 
 

FILM, TELEVISION AND THEATRE

FTT 30129 / AMST 30171 / JED 30129 (CBL/EL)
The Digital Newsroom
Victoria St. Martin, Richard Jones
Credit Hours: 3
Building on the skills acquired in Fundamentals of Journalism, this practicum course is centered around students preparing stories, photos and videos for The Observer, the university's independent, student-run newspaper. Students will acquire real-world experience in reporting, writing, and using their digital journalism skills by covering live news events on campus and in the surrounding community. Pre-requisite: Fundamentals of Journalism.
 
FTT 30130 / AMST 30220 / JED 30130 (CBL/EL)
Covering America
Richard Jones
Credit Hours: 3
The course is a practical and conceptual exploration of the journalistic issues involved in reporting on topics of national interest. This is an advanced reporting course in which students will build on their digital and multi-platform journalism skills and learn to produce stories for audiences nationwide. The capstone assignment requires traveling to the site of an ongoing national story during Spring Break; the resulting stories, photos and videos will be published on a student-produced website. Please note: There are no additional costs for students in this course; all travel costs will be covered for any student who is admitted to the course. Admission to the course by permission only.
 
 
 
 

GALIVAN JOURNALISM PROGRAM

JED 30129 / FTT 30129 / AMST 30171 (CBL/EL)
The Digital Newsroom
Victoria St. Martin, Richard Jones
Credit Hours: 3
Building on the skills acquired in Fundamentals of Journalism, this practicum course is centered around students preparing stories, photos and videos for The Observer, the university's independent, student-run newspaper. Students will acquire real-world experience in reporting, writing, and using their digital journalism skills by covering live news events on campus and in the surrounding community. Pre-requisite: Fundamentals of Journalism.
 
JED 30130 / FTT 30130 / AMST 30220 (CBL/EL)
Covering America
Richard Jones
Credit Hours: 3
The course is a practical and conceptual exploration of the journalistic issues involved in reporting on topics of national interest. This is an advanced reporting course in which students will build on their digital and multi-platform journalism skills and learn to produce stories for audiences nationwide. The capstone assignment requires traveling to the site of an ongoing national story during Spring Break; the resulting stories, photos and videos will be published on a student-produced website. Please note: There are no additional costs for students in this course; all travel costs will be covered for any student who is admitted to the course. Admission to the course by permission only.
 

 

 

 

GENDER STUDIES

GSC 40522 / GSC 60522 / AMST 30761 / CNST 40404 / ESS 40610 / HESB 40104 / HIST 30861 / IIPS 40921 / AFST 40711(CBL)
Prisons and Policing in the U.S.
Pamela Butler
Credit Hours: 3
Scholars and activists use the concept of the ? carceral state? to describe the official, government use of policing, surveillance, and mass imprisonment to exercise control over society. This course examines the histories, cultures, politics, and economics of prisons and policing in the United States, in order to determine how the U.S. carceral state has been a factor in the social construction of race, gender, and citizenship. We will study the genealogy of the U.S. carceral state -- beginning with the surveillance embedded in the earliest practices of slavery and settler colonialism, tracing its development through the 19th and early 20th centuries, and concluding with the rise of the modern prison industrial complex. We will then focus on contemporary U.S. prisons, policing, and surveillance, using case studies including the ?war on drugs,? immigrant detention, sex-crime regulation, and police violence. Finally, we will consider alternatives to prisons and policing, as we learn about academic research and activist movements working to end state and police violence, abolish prisons, and create opportunities for restorative justice. Over the course of the semester, students will learn about the historical development and ongoing maintenance of the carceral state, using an intersectional framework that highlights the ways in which prisons and policing have both shaped, and been shaped by, race, gender, citizenship, and economics. Along the way, students will ask and address such questions as: How does the U.S. carceral state function as a tool for social control? What histories, policies, and ideologies underlie the carceral state? How have individuals and organizations worked to transform or abolish the carceral state? How have art and cultural production been used to normalize and/or critique the carceral state? And can we imagine a world without prisons or police?
 
GSC 40567 / GSC 60555 / IIPS 50705 / IIPS 70211 THEO 40810 / THEO 60923 (Optional CBL)
Feminist and Multicultural Theologies
Catherine Hilkert
Credit Hours: 3
An exploration of how the voices of women have helped to reshape theological discourse and to bring to light new dimensions of the living Christian tradition. Using writings of feminist, womanist, Latina, mujerista, Asian, and "Third World" theologians, the course will focus on the significance of gender and social location in understanding the nature and sources of theology, theological anthropology, Christology/soteriology, the mystery of God, and women's spirituality.
 
GSC 60522 / GSC 40522 / AMST 30761 / CNST 40404 / ESS 40610 /  HESB 40104 / HIST 30861 / IIPS 40921 /AFST 40711 (CBL)
Prisons and Policing in the U.S.
Pamela Butler
Credit Hours: 3
Scholars and activists use the concept of the ?carceral state? to describe the official, government use of policing, surveillance, and mass imprisonment to exercise control over society. This course examines the histories, cultures, politics, and economics of prisons and policing in the United States, in order to determine how the U.S. carceral state has been a factor in the social construction of race, gender, and citizenship. We will study the genealogy of the U.S. carceral state -- beginning with the surveillance embedded in the earliest practices of slavery and settler colonialism, tracing its development through the 19th and early 20th centuries, and concluding with the rise of the modern prison industrial complex. We will then focus on contemporary U.S. prisons, policing, and surveillance, using case studies including the ?war on drugs,? immigrant detention, sex-crime regulation, and police violence. Finally, we will consider alternatives to prisons and policing, as we learn about academic research and activist movements working to end state and police violence, abolish prisons, and create opportunities for restorative justice. Over the course of the semester, students will learn about the historical development and ongoing maintenance of the carceral state, using an intersectional framework that highlights the ways in which prisons and policing have both shaped, and been shaped by, race, gender, citizenship, and economics. Along the way, students will ask and address such questions as: How does the U.S. carceral state function as a tool for social control? What histories, policies, and ideologies underlie the carceral state? How have individuals and organizations worked to transform or abolish the carceral state? How have art and cultural production been used to normalize and/or critique the carceral state? And can we imagine a world without prisons or police?
 
GSC 60555 / GSC 40567 / IIPS 50705 / IIPS 70211 / THEO 40810 / THEO 60923  (Optional CBL)
Feminist and Multicultural Theologies
Catherine Hilkert
Credit Hours: 3
An exploration of how the voices of women have helped to reshape theological discourse and to bring to light new dimensions of the living Christian tradition. Using writings of feminist, womanist, Latina, mujerista, Asian, and "Third World" theologians, the course will focus on the significance of gender and social location in understanding the nature and sources of theology, theological anthropology, Christology/soteriology, the mystery of God, and women's spirituality.
 
 

 

HISTORY

HIST 30861/ AMST 30761 / CNST 40404 / ESS 40610 / GSC 40522 / GSC 60522 / HESB 40104  / IIPS 40921 / AFST 40711 (CBL)
Prisons and Policing in the U.S.
Pamela Butler
Credit Hours: 3
Scholars and activists use the concept of the ?carceral state? to describe the official, government use of policing, surveillance, and mass imprisonment to exercise control over society. This course examines the histories, cultures, politics, and economics of prisons and policing in the United States, in order to determine how the U.S. carceral state has been a factor in the social construction of race, gender, and citizenship. We will study the genealogy of the U.S. carceral state -- beginning with the surveillance embedded in the earliest practices of slavery and settler colonialism, tracing its development through the 19th and early 20th centuries, and concluding with the rise of the modern prison industrial complex. We will then focus on contemporary U.S. prisons, policing, and surveillance, using case studies including the ?war on drugs,? immigrant detention, sex-crime regulation, and police violence. Finally, we will consider alternatives to prisons and policing, as we learn about academic research and activist movements working to end state and police violence, abolish prisons, and create opportunities for restorative justice. Over the course of the semester, students will learn about the historical development and ongoing maintenance of the carceral state, using an intersectional framework that highlights the ways in which prisons and policing have both shaped, and been shaped by, race, gender, citizenship, and economics. Along the way, students will ask and address such questions as: How does the U.S. carceral state function as a tool for social control? What histories, policies, and ideologies underlie the carceral state? How have individuals and organizations worked to transform or abolish the carceral state? How have art and cultural production been used to normalize and/or critique the carceral state? And can we imagine a world without prisons or police?   
 
HIST 33613 (CBL)  / AMST 30467 (CBL, EL) / ESS 33613/(CBL)
History of American Indian Education
Brian Collier
Credit Hours: 3
This course blends the History of Education and American Indian History and is open (by invitation only) to students interested in action research on these two topics. The course may include an opportunity to collaborate on a project with a school that is part of the Native mission network schools and may include travel to a Native community. The course is by invitation only as it has an outcome opportunity of a conference in September 2016.
 
 
 
 

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

LAST 30004 / ANTH  33314 / ANTH  63314 / ASIA  30305 / IDS  33100 / IIPS  30927  (EL)
Immigration Global Perspective
Maurizio Albahari
Credit hours: 3
How do people in immigrant-receiving countries shape their attitudes toward immigrants? What are the differences between refugees and other migrants? How is immigration related to urban "immigrant riots"? And what can anthropological studies of borders and national policies tell us about the transnational world in which we live? We will examine these and related questions, and more generally the causes, lived experiences, and consequences of migration. We will acquire a sound understanding of migration in its social, political, legal, and cultural facets. Fieldwork accounts from countries of origin and from the US, Europe, Australia, and Japan will enable us to appreciate both global and US distinctive trends. Rather than merely learning a collection of facts about immigrants, we will address how migration intersects with gender and class; the mass-media; border enforcement; racism; the economy; territory and identity formation, and religion. 
 
 
 

 

MUSIC

MUS 20691 (CBL/EL)
Wind and Percussion Pedagogy
Kenneth Dye, Justin McManus
Credit Hours: 1
Notre Dame students will learn teaching techniques on their instruments through hands-on instruction of local students in the Bandlink program. Instruction will be in individual lessons and small group rehearsals.
 
 
 
 

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 20813 (CBL)
Religion, Identity & Social Justice
Katherine Finley
Credit Hours: 3
Far too often we examine important questions in philosophy of religion in isolation from the lived experiences of ourselves and others. In this community-engaged course, students will investigate topics in philosophy of religion including: social justice, free will, religious experience, the problem of evil, and the role of art and liturgy ? particularly as they intersect with, and are informed by, various facets of identity (particularly those related to race, gender, class, and ability). In addition to engaging with classic and contemporary philosophical work and other media (e.g. movies, speculative fiction), students are required to regularly (weekly) attend either an off-campus worship service and/or regularly (weekly) participate in the work of an off-campus faith-based service organization of their choosing (although students themselves need not be religious, nor participate in a service or organization of any particular religious tradition). The class will also regularly visit off-campus, faith-based community organizations in South Bend and engage with community partners through roundtable discussions, and more informally over meals. Students will be challenged both to address ways in which their own identities inform (and in some cases limit) their understanding of the topics discussed, and to actively seek out members of their communities in order to expand their understanding of these issues. (This is a Community-Engaged Learning course done in conjunction with the Center for Social Concerns, and is ideal for students already regularly involved in the kind of community described, however it is also open to those not yet involved).
 
 

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 35901 (CBL/CBR)
Internships
Carolina Arroyo
Credit Hours: 1
The goal of the internship program is to provide opportunities to integrate coursework with real work experience. Internships are available throughout the Notre Dame area with a variety of government offices, non-profit agencies and NGO's. Interns work with professionals in their own area of interest, explore career options, and gain real work experience. Permission required. Does not count for the Political Science Major.

 

 

 

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 23096 / CSC 33998 (CB/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Understanding Mental Illness
Lisa Anderson, Jay Brandenberger
Credit Hours: 1
In the United States alone, over 60 million people are affected with a mental illness in a given year. Fourteen million of those suffer with chronic, serious mental illness. Countless family members, friends and mental health professionals struggle to understand and help those diagnosed with these confusing and often debilitating diseases. Unless we know someone or struggle with similar issues ourselves, the majority of the rest of us know virtually nothing about the confusing "world" of mental illness. This seminar gives students the opportunity to learn about mental illness from the personal perspective of those most directly impacted by it: those living with it, family members, and health care providers. The goals of this seminar are to help students become more knowledgeable about these diseases and develop understanding and compassion for those who suffer from them.
 
PSY 23271 / PSY 43271 / ESS 40263 (CBL/EL)
Autism Spectrum Disorder IW
Kristin Wier
Credit Hours: 3
This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct educational programs with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) while acquiring an in-depth knowledge of the individual, family, community, and cultural issues surrounding the diagnosis. For the practicum portion of the course, students will work within a structured program in a family home, on-average two times a weeks for at least four hours (50 hours over the course of the semester). For the in-class portion of the course, students will meet with the instructors to discuss current research/readings, important topics, and personal experiences related to ASD. It is our hope that through this course you will begin to gain an understanding of individuals with ASD and acquire the skills to support them and their families. In addition, you will continue to develop the communication skills (written and oral) that are crucial to be a successful professional in the field of developmental disabilities. Please note that a version of this course is offered at the 40000 level which has a significant writing requirement (and has additional required coursework, see listing). Other requirements: Unless other arrangements are made, students need to have a car or regular access to transportation. Access to a car can be arranged through the Center for Social Concerns.
 
PSY 23852 / CSC 33968 / ESS 33362 / THEO 33968  (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: L'Arche Community
Marley Bonnichsen, Melissa Marley
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar centers around travel to a L'Arche community (e.g., Toronto, Canada) to share community life with developmentally challenged persons. Students draw from the philosophy of Jean Vanier, the works of theologian Henri Nouwen, and other spiritual writings to augment this participatory learning experience.
 
PSY 23855 / ESS 23250 / ESS 33362 / CSC 23855 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten
Jay Brandenberger, Ellen Kyes
Credit Hours: 1
Take Ten is a research-based conflict resolution curriculum designed at the University of Notre Dame and headquartered at the University's Robinson Community Learning Center. Take Ten's mission is to provide youth with positive alternatives to violence and build their capacity to make more informed choices when faced with conflict. Take Ten volunteers work on a weekly basis with schoolchildren of all grades to teach them the skills needed to resolve conflict peacefully. Born as a restorative practice within the scope of a restorative justice lens, Take Ten has recently developed a method of teaching its curriculum in the Peacemaking Circles format as well as offering Talking Circles at some schools.Students participating in the Take Ten seminar will serve as Take Ten volunteers during the semester (February through May with training in January), being part of a team that works at a school in the area one time per week. The seminar itself will meet in the Peacemaking Circles format and will function as training for seminar students to become Circle facilitators. Readings and reflections will allow students to focus on understanding issues of youth and violence from various perspectives and to discuss their work in Circle.
 
PSY 33685 / PSY 60685 / ARCH 40312 / ARCH 60312
Social Factors & Sustainability: Effects of the Built Environment on Health & Well-Being
Kimberly Rollings
Credit Hours: 3
This course focuses on the interaction between people and the physical environment on human health, well-being, behavior, and sustainability. Social and physical factors across multiple scales - from specific environments (residential, educational, work, healthcare, and commercial), urban and natural settings, to the planet - are explored. Issues of public health, environmental justice, universal design, and culture are included throughout. Lecture and discussion class with hands-on assignments and quizzes. Upper level undergraduate and graduate students from across the University and especially in architecture, the sustainability minor, design, pre-professional studies, social sciences, and business are encouraged to enroll.
 
PSY 43271 / PSY 23271 / ESS 40263 (CBL/EL)
Autism Spectrum Disorder IW
Kristin Wier
Credit Hours: 3
This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct educational programs with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) while acquiring an in-depth knowledge of the individual, family, community, and cultural issues surrounding the diagnosis. For the practicum portion of the course, students will work within a structured program in a family home, on-average two times a weeks for at least four hours (50 hours over the course of the semester). For the in-class portion of the course, students will meet with the instructors to discuss current research/readings, important topics, and personal experiences related to ASD. It is our hope that through this course you will begin to gain an understanding of individuals with ASD and acquire the skills to support them and their families. In addition, you will continue to develop the communication skills (written and oral) that are crucial to be a successful professional in the field of developmental disabilities. Please note that a version of this course is offered at the 40000 level which has a significant writing requirement (and has additional required coursework, see listing). Other requirements: Unless other arrangements are made, students need to have a car or regular access to transportation. Access to a car can be arranged through the Center for Social Concerns.
 
PSY 60685 / PSY 33685 / ARCH 40312 / ARCH 60312
Social Factors & Sustainability: Effects of the Built Environment on Health & Well-Being
Kimberly Rollings
Credit Hours: 3
This course focuses on the interaction between people and the physical environment on human health, well-being, behavior, and sustainability. Social and physical factors across multiple scales - from specific environments (residential, educational, work, healthcare, and commercial), urban and natural settings, to the planet - are explored. Issues of public health, environmental justice, universal design, and culture are included throughout. Lecture and discussion class with hands-on assignments and quizzes. Upper level undergraduate and graduate students from across the University and especially in architecture, the sustainability minor, design, pre-professional studies, social sciences, and business are encouraged to enroll.
 
PSY 61382 (EL)
Child Practicum II
Kristin Valentino
Credit Hours: 3
In this practicum, students will continue developing their clinical skills in the provision of psychological assessments for children and adolescents in a community health care setting. Assessments will include cognitive, educational, developmental, socioemotional, and neuropsychological testing. Collaboration with physicians and consultation in pediatric settings will also be emphasized.
 
PSY 61384 (CBL)
Adult Assessment Practicum II
Lee Anna Clark
Credit Hours: 3
In this practicum, students will gain clinical experience providing psychological assessments for adults referred from a community mental-health center. They will learn to administer several semi-structured interviews, to interpret questionnaire scores, and to write comprehensive reports. Assessments will include taking a comprehensive psychosocial history, diagnosis of clinical symptoms and syndromes, assessment of personality and personality disorder, and psychosocial and daily functioning.
 
PSY 61386 (CBL/EL)
Practicum II
Jennifer Hames
Credit Hours: 3
Prepares doctoral counseling students in various dimensions of the therapeutic, including providing an advanced skill base for clinical case management.
 
PSY 61388 (CBL)
Practicum IV
Jennifer Hames
Credit Hours: 3
Supervised clinical practicum for doctoral students in counseling psychology
 
PSY 61390 (CBL)
Practicum VI
Jennifer Hames
Credit Hours: Variable
Supervised clinical practicum for doctoral students in counseling psychology
 
PSY 61394 (CBL)
Marital Therapy Practicum
David Smith
Credit Hours: Variable
Trainees who have successfully completed the Marital Therapy Seminar register for this supervised practicum every semester. They carry cases at the Marital Therapy and Research Clinic.
 
PSY 61397 (CBL)
Practicum VIII
Jennifer Hames
Credit Hours: Variable
Supervised clinical practicum for doctoral students in counseling psychology
 
 
 
 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

LLRO 13186
Literature University Seminar
Marisel Moreno
Credit Hours: 3
An introduction to the seminar method of instruction, emphasizing the analysis of literary texts.
 
ROIT 10102 (sec. 1 CRN 20943) (sec. 2 CRN 20274) (sec. 3 25406) (sec. 4 CRN 20513) (sec. 5 CRN 25407) (sec.6 CRN 30909) ( EL)
Beginning Italian II
Guido Guerra, Alessia Blad, Patrick Vivirito
This is an introductory, first-year language sequence with equal focus on the four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. An appreciation for Italian culture is also encouraged through readings and class discussion. The sequence 10101-10102 is to be followed by ROIT 20201 or ROIT 20215.
 
ROSP 20201 (sec. 1-10) (CBL/EL)
Intermediate Spanish I
Maria Jose Fernandez Moreno, Tatiana Botero, Andrea Topash-Rios, Rachel Parroquin
Credit Hours: 3
This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts.
 
ROSP 20202 (sec. 1-6) (CBL/EL)
Intermediate Spanish II
Elena Mangione-Lora, Maria Coloma, Maria Jose Fernandez Moreno, Diana Jorza
Credit Hours: 3
This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts.
 
ROSP 20460 (sec.1-2)  (EL)
Spanish for Medical Profession
Maria Coloma
Credit Hours: 3
This course introduces students who have mastered the rudiments of Spanish grammar to a vocabulary allowing them to discuss medicine and health care with the Spanish-speaking population in the United States.

 

ROSP 20810 (sec. 1-2) / ILS 20912 (CBL)
Community-Based Spanish: Language, Culture, and Community
Tatiana Botero, Andrea Topash-Rios
Credit Hours: 3
This fifth-semester language and culture course is designed for students who want to improve their communication skills in Spanish and broaden their understanding of the Hispanic world through connecting with the local Spanish speaking community. Each section may focus on different topics, such as health care, education, social services, history of immigration, and intercultural competence. The course has a required Community-Based-Learning component in which students engage with the Latino community through placements in such areas as health care, youth mentoring or tutoring programs, English as a New Language (ENL) classes, and facilitating educational workshops with parents. In this course, students integrate their service experiences with the academic components of the class through readings, research, reflective writing, and discussion.
 
ROSP 30051 (CBL)
Community-Based Learning:: Once Upon a Time
Rachel Parroquin
Credit Hours: 3
Students will be introduced to Literatura Infantil y Juvenil (LIJ) in the Spanish-speaking world through a combination of considerable reading of LIJ across genres and levels and a critical perspective of LIJ via academic text and articles. Authors will include prolific writers of LIJ like Alma Flor Ada, as well as widely known writers like Cortázar, Paz, Pérez Revérte, Poniatowska, and Vargas LLosa who have also begun writing children's books. Among genres read will be folklore, narrative, fiction (contemporary, realistic, historical, multicultural), fantasy, short story, poetry, and non-fiction. Students will also learn about various LIJ book awards and their evolution over time. In addition, students will develop criteria for evaluating quality LIJ. Finally, there is a Community-Based Learning (CBL) component where students will share LIJ with the local Latino community through CBL projects and/or a reading program with Latino youth. Pre-requiste: ROSP 20202 or above or placement by exam. This course can count as an advanced elective towards the major.
 

 

 

 

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 33001 / CST 33301 / ESS 30214 / IIPS 33702 (CBL/EL)
Sociology, Self Catholic Social Tradition
Andrew Weigert
Credit Hours: 3
What's Catholic about sociology? What's sociological about Catholic Social Tradition? What does all this mean for sociology majors, what they study, and how this may affect their careers and lives after graduation? This course is a critical examination of the links between Catholic social thought and sociology as a discipline. We will engage these ideas through an experimental, team-taught seminar format. Readings will include core statements of Catholic social tradition, critiques thereof, and autobiographical essays written by sociologists and others who are dedicated to social justice. An experiential community-based learning dimension is a requirement for this course. All students are to make at least 10 two-hour weekly visits to the Center for the Homeless in South Bend and write a seven page account of their experiences indicating what they learned or wish they had learned and how their experiences impacted their thinking about Catholic Social Tradition.
 
SOC 33458 / CST 33458 / CSC 33458 / ILS 33701 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Mexico-U.S. Border Immersion Seminar
Kraig Beyerlein
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar and experiential-learning course is broken into two parts. In the fall (for two credits), students will participate in a seminar that will expose them to various perspectives about immigration issues, especially those related to the México-U.S. border. During our in-class meetings in the fall, (approximately 1 hr. & 40 min. per week), we will discuss scholarly and journalistic accounts of why migrants leave their home countries, the struggles they face during the journey, how U.S. citizens are responding, and possible policy solutions. In the spring (for one credit), students will participate in an immersion trip to the Southern Arizona borderlands during the first week of January and in follow-up classroom meetings (approximately 50 min. per week) during the spring semester to process the immersion experience. During the immersion trip, we will observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, be trained for and participate in humanitarian efforts, tour a Border Patrol and detention facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from faith leaders about their current and past border activism, and visit Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community. Throughout the course, particular focus will be given to the intersection of religion - especially Catholic Social Teachings - and border and immigration issues. To be eligible, students must complete an application, linked here:https://www3.nd.edu/~csc/application/sem_application.php?s=Fall&y=2017. Enrollment is competitive. The 15 available spots will be chosen based on the application responses, with preference given to those submitting earliest. Students will be notified about their status within a week of submitting the application. There are fees associated with this seminar (also see CSC website for information). This is a graded course. Department approval is required. [Note: Due to the overlap in content, students who have completed the one-credit version (CSC 33966/SOC 33066/ILS 30804/THEO 33966) cannot take this course.]
 
SOC 45000 (CB/CBRL)
Sociology Internships
Mim Thomas
Credit Hours: Variable
The Sociology Internship is a community-based learning course designed to give students some practical experience in the area of urban affairs, social welfare, education, health care, or business, in order to test their interest, complement their academic work, or acquire work experience preparatory to future careers. Students are placed in a community agency in the South Bend area and normally work seven hours per week as interns under the supervision of an experienced practitioner. Scheduling hours is a flexible process in order to accommodate the intern's availability and the needs of the host agency. While there are no prerequisites, preference is given to Sociology majors, ALPP or SCPP majors, PSIM minors, and students who have had course work in an area related to social concerns. This is a graded course. In addition to field work, academic work includes reading scholarly works related to the field placement, periodic group meetings with the instructor and others in the course, periodic short reports, and a final paper. Departmental approval is required. The following is a list of agencies that have accepted interns. Students may also request placement in an agency they find on their own (subject to approval by the instructor). La Casa de AmistadSalvation Army of St. Joseph County (Social Services)Sex Offense Services of St. Joseph County (must complete paper work and training a semester in advance)Early Childhood Development Center Good Shepherd Montessori SchoolRobinson Community Learning CenterUpward Bound College Preparatory Program, UNDAIDS AssistCenter for Hospice & Palliative Care, St. Joseph County (usually requires two-semester commitment)Sr. Maura Brannick Health Center at Chapin StreetThe CASIE Center (Child Abuse Services, Investigation & Education) Family Justice CenterIndiana Legal Services.
 

 

 

 

THEOLOGY

THEO 20625 / CST 20625 (CBL)
Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice
Kevin Sandberg
Credit Hours: 3
This course is designed for students who have completed a Summer Service Project Internship (SSLP or ISSLP) or Social Enterprise Microfinance Internship (SEMI). It affords students the opportunity to re-engage their immersion experiences. Students will employ tools of social analysis, theological reflection, and rhetoric relative to both topics such as hunger, homelessness, poverty, incarceration, and immigration, and themes such as freedom, solidarity, mimesis, power, and the preferential option for the poor. The goal of the course is to develop a theology of discipleship to which justice is integral, including considerations of worship, sustainability, social reconciliation and restorative justice.
 
THEO 20643 / CST 20643 / IIPS 20729 (CBL)
The Askesis of Nonviolence: Theology and Practice
Margaret Pfeil
Credit Hours: 3
This course will explore the theology and practice of nonviolence as a form of askesis, or spiritual discipline. The material will include readings from Scripture, the early Christian tradition, and Catholic social teaching. Religious sources outside the Christian tradition will include Gandhi, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Badshah Khan. This course will use the method of community-based learning and will require 20 hours of service at particular sites in the South Bend area.
 
THEO 30657 / CST 30657 (CBL)
Theological Perspective on Poverty and Health
Mark Fox
Credit Hours: 3
The goal of the course is to develop a robust understanding of the relationship between poverty and the social determinants of health on health status, health access, and health outcomes and to examine one?s own faith commitments by engaging a dialogue among various strands of Christian social thought. This is a seminar course with substantive community engagement related to health-related social needs. This course combines the study of epidemiologic data related to disparities in health status, access, and outcomes, with the examination of theological texts from various traditions (the Social Gospel, Prosperity Gospel, and Catholic Social Teaching). Community engagement with an agency addressing health-related social needs (but NOT health care delivery) will be an integral part of the course, providing an experiential basis for the study of the relationship between poverty and health, and how we as a community are compelled to respond.
 
THEO 33933 / CSC 33933 / CST 33933 (CBL/EL)
Summer Service Learning: Cross-Cultural Learning Program (CCLP)
Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 3
This is a leadership internship for Cross-cultural/Urban studies working 8 weeks in a multicultural area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will work with ILS to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved. Students will complete academic requirements including readings, reflection sessions, and a presentation of a synthesis paper at the end of the internship. Application and interview necessary for participation.
 
THEO 33936 / CST 33936 / CSC 33936 (CBL/EL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins
Benjamin Wilson
Credit Hours: 3
Immersion: Eight week summer service-learning placements This three-credit course of the Summer Service Learning Program takes place before, during, and after student participation in the eighth consecutive week summer immersion sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Notre Dame Alumni Association. The goal of the course is to reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through experiential learning, reading, writing and discussions. Writing assignments include journal assignments and a final paper. The course is completed during the first five weeks of fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. Acceptance is based on the student's application and interview. Contact the Center for Social Concerns for more information.
 
THEO 33938 / CSC 33938 / CST 33938 (CBL/EL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues International
Rachel Tomas Morgan
Credit Hours: 3
This course and internship is synonymous with the Center for Social Concerns International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP). The course seeks to challenge students who have domestic service-learning experiences to encounter international realities, and to provide them the opportunity to work with persons and grass roots groups working to address the needs of the poor internationally. The learning goals of the course are to gain an understanding of the multi-dimensionality of poverty in the developing world; analyze root causes, and identify strategies for social development (poverty alleviation); to gain an understanding of international social issues in light of Catholic social teaching; and to strengthen cross-cultural competencies. Academic requirements include a journal, reading and writing assignments during the summer months, a mandatory day retreat in the fall following the summer placement, attendance at the four re-entry classes in August and September, debriefing and a final paper/project.
 
THEO 33950 / CST 33950 / CSC 33950 / (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.
 
THEO 33951 / CST 33951 / CSC 33951 (EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: U.S. Health Care
Kyle Lantz
Credit Hours: 1
U.S. health care policy and reform has increasingly been at the center of public debate and discussion in recent years. Furthermore, the Catholic social tradition invites persons of good will to pursue a health care system that raises the dignity of each person. This seminar invites participants to examine and assess our current and evolving healthcare system, explore the possibilities and direction of the future of U.S. healthcare, and investigate how modifications might move us toward a society that reflects care for the common good. As a point of comparison, this seminar will also evaluate international health care systems and challenges. In preparation, students will look at the complexities of integrating economics, policy, and health-related outcomes into a system that works toward the common good and especially toward those in poverty. Students will travel to Washington, D.C., during Spring Break to spend time with policy makers, health care advocacy groups, medical professionals, and researchers.
 
THEO 33952 / CSC 33952 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Social Change
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen, Connie Mick
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar allows students to participate in an experiential opportunity designed to examine contemporary social problems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.
 
THEO 33963 / CST 33963 / CSC 33963 (CBL/EL)
Social Concern Seminar: Church Social Action
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen, Kyle Lantz
Credit Hours: 1
This course centers around a 48-hour immersion (colloquially known as the Urban Plunge) in an urban setting during the winter break (prior to return to campus). The course includes a preparation workshop in the fall semester, readings, two reflection papers, and follow-up educational meetings.
 
THEO 33967 / CST 33967 / CSC 33967 / ILS 33967 (CBL/EL)
Social Concern Seminar: Migrant Experience
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar offers a unique immersion into the lives of migrant farm workers in Florida during the spring harvest.
 
THEO 33968 / PSY 23852 / CST 33968 / CSC 33968 / CSC 63970 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: L'Arche Community
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen
Credit Hours: 1
The L'Arche Seminar introduces students to the philosophy of Jean Vanier and to the model of service that his writings inspired. The class sessions leading up to the immersion will cover topics such as: Catholic Social Tradition and a framework for Solidarity; Spirituality lived in Community; Policy, Advocacy, and Discrimination; Vanier on Becoming Human. This is an invitation to think deeply about and observe directly a community (of people with and without disabilities) living together in the spirit of the beatitudes. Students will also witness how living in a L'Arche community has influenced the lives of the core members, assistants, and others. Students will likely have some opportunity to communicate with other organizations about their advocacy and policy work that relates to people with disabilities.
 
THEO 33970 / CST 33970 / CSC 33970 (CBL/EL)
Global Issues
Rachel Tomas Morgan
Credit Hours: 1
This course serves as the required orientation course for all THEO 33938: International Summer Service Learning Program participants. It will provide students with an introduction to international issues in developing countries through the lens of Catholic social tradition, guidance in independent country/area study, preparation and tools for cross-cultural service, opportunities for theological reflection, logistical information necessary for international programs and travel, and general support within the context of a community of colleagues. Students must attend the mandatory Cross-Cultural Orientation Retreat held on February 9-10, 2018. Other students doing summer internships in developing countries may take the course with permission from the instructor.
 
THEO 40632 (CBL/EL)
Heart’s Desire and Social Change
Daniel Groody
Credit Hours: 3
Beyond financial prosperity and material gain, many people today speak about the hunger to find purpose and meaningful work that has lasting impact on society, culture, and the global community. We not only want to find lucrative employment but to discover a way of life that resonates with the deepest part of ourselves. When we experience a consistent flow between our life's energies and our daily tasks, we are the most alive, engaged and at peace. But how can we find a way to integrate our inner and outer lives? This course will help students clarify their deepest passions in life that facilitate personal formation and social transformation. At its core it will explore the process of self-awareness and self-development that lead ultimately to self-gift. Some of the major themes we will look at include: values, spirituality, discernment, identity, true self/false self, justice, flow, freedom, Catholic Social Teaching and mission.
 
THEO 40810 / THEO 60823 / GSC 40567 / GSC 60555 / IIPS 50705 / IIPS 70211 (Optional CBL)
Feminist and Multicultural Theologies
M. Catherine Hilkert
Credit Hours: 3
An exploration of how the voices of women have helped to reshape theological discourse and to bring to light new dimensions of the living Christian tradition. Using writings of feminist, womanist, Latina, mujerista, Asian, and "Third World" theologians, the course will focus on the significance of gender and social location in understanding the nature and sources of theology, theological anthropology, Christology/soteriology, the mystery of God, and women's spirituality.
 
THEO 60408 / ANTH 43318 / ANTH 63318 DMAB 83104 / MSM 63103 (EL)
Ritual Studies
Peter Jeffery
Credit Hours: 3
Ritual is the most powerful medium of communication, since it can make use of language, performance, symbolism, architecture?anything humans can do. Ritual can be found everywhere?in religion, politics, marketing, entertainment. In this hands-on course we will learn how to research the ways people use or avoid ritual: how and why they embrace or reject liturgical reforms, invent new rites or revive old ones, cross or respect picket lines, wear funny hats at sports events, fight over the planning of the high school prom, or go out for a smoke during the sermon?and how ritual shapes culture and is shaped by culture. Learning by doing, we will be initiated into the academic study of symbolism, narrative, myth, memory, community, and culture, using social science techniques that include participant observation, semi-structured interviewing, focus groups, writing and coding field notes, film criticism, and more.
 
THEO 60698 / CSC 60698 (CBL/EL)
Common Good Initiative  Germany/Austria
Clemens Sedmark
Credit Hours: 2
The course will offer a well prepared immersion in Southern Germany and Austria exploring holocaust memorial sites and encountering communities of memory. It will employ of a multi-disciplinary approach, making use of insights and approaches from theology, philosophy, history, education, architecture, social geography, political science, sociology. The course intends to offer bridges to a discussion of the common good and its connections to an ethics of remembering. The course is offered to graduate students from different disciplines.
 
THEO 60823 / THEO 40810 / GSC 40567 / GSC 60555 / IIPS 50705 / IIPS 70211 (Optional CBL)
Feminist and Multicultural Theologies
M. Catherine Hilkert
Credit Hours: 3
An exploration of how the voices of women have helped to reshape theological discourse and to bring to light new dimensions of the living Christian tradition. Using writings of feminist, womanist, Latina, mujerista, Asian, and "Third World" theologians, the course will focus on the significance of gender and social location in understanding the nature and sources of theology, theological anthropology, Christology/soteriology, the mystery of God, and women's spirituality.
 
 

 

WRITING AND RHETORIC

WR 13200 (EL) (sec. 1-5)
Community Writing and Rhetoric
Lorraine Cuddeback, Elizabeth Capdevielle, Dominique Vargas, Stacy Sivinski, Sarah Snider
Credit Hours: 3
In cooperation with the Center for Social Concerns, these sections of composition place students in learning situations in the wider community where they are in contact with people who are dealing with the specific content issue of their section. We welcome students with commitment to social justice and community service to enroll.

 

SUPPLEMENTARY MAJORS, MINORS, AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS

 

 

 

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TRADITION

CST 20625 / THEO 20625 (CBL)
Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice
Kevin Sandberg
Credit Hours: 3
This course is designed for students who have completed a Summer Service Project Internship (SSLP or ISSLP) or Social Enterprise Microfinance Internship (SEMI). It affords students the opportunity to re-engage their immersion experiences. Students will employ tools of social analysis, theological reflection, and rhetoric relative to both topics such as hunger, homelessness, poverty, incarceration, and immigration, and themes such as freedom, solidarity, mimesis, power, and the preferential option for the poor. The goal of the course is to develop a theology of discipleship to which justice is integral, including considerations of worship, sustainability, social reconciliation and restorative justice.
 
CST 20643 / THEO 20643 / IIPS 20729 (CBL)
The Askesis of Nonviolence
Margaret Pfeil
Credit Hours: 3
This course will explore the theology and practice of nonviolence as a form of askesis, or spiritual discipline. The material will include readings from Scripture, the early Christian tradition, and Catholic social teaching. Religious sources outside the Christian tradition will include Gandhi, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Badshah Khan. This course will use the method of community-based learning and will require 20 hours of service at particular sites in the South Bend area.
 
CST 30657 / THEO 30657 (CBL)
Theological Perspective on Poverty and Health
Mark Fox
Credit Hours: 3
The goal of the course is to develop a robust understanding of the relationship between poverty and the social determinants of health on health status, health access, and health outcomes and to examine one?s own faith commitments by engaging a dialogue among various strands of Christian social thought. This is a seminar course with substantive community engagement related to health-related social needs. This course combines the study of epidemiologic data related to disparities in health status, access, and outcomes, with the examination of theological texts from various traditions (the Social Gospel, Prosperity Gospel, and Catholic Social Teaching). Community engagement with an agency addressing health-related social needs (but NOT health care delivery) will be an integral part of the course, providing an experiential basis for the study of the relationship between poverty and health, and how we as a community are compelled to respond.
 
CST 33301 / SOC 33001 / ESS 30214 / IIPS 33702 (CBL/EL)
Sociology, Self Catholic Social Tradition
Andrew Weigert
Credit Hours: 3
What's Catholic about sociology? What's sociological about Catholic Social Tradition? What does all this mean for sociology majors, what they study, and how this may affect their careers and lives after graduation? This course is a critical examination of the links between Catholic social thought and sociology as a discipline. We will engage these ideas through an experimental, team-taught seminar format. Readings will include core statements of Catholic social tradition, critiques thereof, and autobiographical essays written by sociologists and others who are dedicated to social justice. An experiential community-based learning dimension is a requirement for this course. All students are to make at least 10 two-hour weekly visits to the Center for the Homeless in South Bend and write a seven page account of their experiences indicating what they learned or wish they had learned and how their experiences impacted their thinking about Catholic Social Tradition.
 
CST 33458 / SOC 33458 / CSC 33458 / ILS 33701 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Mexico-U.S. Border Immersion Seminar
Kraig Beyerlein
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar and experiential-learning course is broken into two parts. In the fall (for two credits), students will participate in a seminar that will expose them to various perspectives about immigration issues, especially those related to the México-U.S. border. During our in-class meetings in the fall, (approximately 1 hr. & 40 min. per week), we will discuss scholarly and journalistic accounts of why migrants leave their home countries, the struggles they face during the journey, how U.S. citizens are responding, and possible policy solutions. In the spring (for one credit), students will participate in an immersion trip to the Southern Arizona borderlands during the first week of January and in follow-up classroom meetings (approximately 50 min. per week) during the spring semester to process the immersion experience. During the immersion trip, we will observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, be trained for and participate in humanitarian efforts, tour a Border Patrol and detention facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from faith leaders about their current and past border activism, and visit Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community. Throughout the course, particular focus will be given to the intersection of religion - especially Catholic Social Teachings - and border and immigration issues. To be eligible, students must complete an application, linked here:https://www3.nd.edu/~csc/application/sem_application.php?s=Fall&y=2017. Enrollment is competitive. The 15 available spots will be chosen based on the application responses, with preference given to those submitting earliest. Students will be notified about their status within a week of submitting the application. There are fees associated with this seminar (also see CSC website for information). This is a graded course. Department approval is required. [Note: Due to the overlap in content, students who have completed the one-credit version (CSC 33966/SOC 33066/ILS 30804/THEO 33966) cannot take this course.]
 
CST 33933 / THEO 33933 / CSC 33933 (CBL/EL)
Summer Service Learning: Cross-Cultural Learning Program (CCLP)
Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 3
This is a leadership internship for Cross-cultural/Urban studies working 8 weeks in a multicultural area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will work with ILS to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved. Students will complete academic requirements including readings, reflection sessions, and a presentation of a synthesis paper at the end of the internship. Application and interview necessary for participation.
 
CST 33936 / THEO 33936 / CSC 33936 (CBL/EL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins
Benjamin Wilson
Credit Hours: 3
Immersion: Eight -week summer service-learning placements This three-credit course of the Summer Service Learning Program takes place before, during, and after student participation in the eight consecutive week summer immersion sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Notre Dame Alumni Association. The goal of the course is to reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through experiential learning, reading, writing and discussions. Writing assignments include journal assignments and a final paper. The course is completed during the first five weeks of fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. Acceptance is based on the student's application and interview. Contact the Center for Social Concerns for more information.
 
CST 33938 / THEO 33938 / CST 33938 (CBL/EL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues International
Rachel Tomas Morgan
Credit Hours: 3
This course and internship is synonymous with the Center for Social Concerns International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP). The course seeks to challenge students who have domestic service-learning experiences to encounter international realities, and to provide them the opportunity to work with persons and grass roots groups working to address the needs of the poor internationally. The learning goals of the course are to gain an understanding of the multi- dimensionality of poverty in the developing world; analyze root causes, and identify strategies for social development (poverty alleviation); to gain an understanding of international social issues in light of Catholic social teaching; and to strengthen cross-cultural competencies. Academic requirements include a journal, reading and writing assignments during the summer months, a mandatory day retreat in the fall following the summer placement, attendance at the four re-entry classes in August and September, debriefing and a final paper/project.
 
CST 33950 / THEO 33950 / CSC 33950 / CSC 63950 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.
 
CST 33951 / THEO 33951 / CSC 33951 (EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: U.S. Healthcare
Kyle Lantz
Credit Hours: 1
U.S. health care policy and reform has increasingly been at the center of public debate and discussion in recent years. Furthermore, the Catholic social tradition invites persons of good will to pursue a health care system that raises the dignity of each person. This seminar invites participants to examine and assess our current and evolving healthcare system, explore the possibilities and direction of the future of U.S. healthcare, and investigate how modifications might move us toward a society that reflects care for the common good. As a point of comparison, this seminar will also evaluate international health care systems and challenges. In preparation, students will look at the complexities of integrating economics, policy, and health-related outcomes into a system that works toward the common good and especially toward those in poverty. Students will travel to Washington, D.C., during Spring Break to spend time with policy makers, health care advocacy groups, medical professionals, and researchers.
 
CST 33963 / THEO 33963 / CSC 33963 (CBL/EL)
Social Concern Seminar: Church Social Action
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen, Kyle Lantz
Credit Hours: 1
This course centers around a 48-hour immersion (colloquially known as the Urban Plunge) in an urban setting during the winter break (prior to return to campus). The course includes a preparation workshop in the fall semester, readings, two reflection papers, and follow-up educational meetings.
 
CST 33967 / THEO 33967 / CSC 33967 / ILS 33967 (CBL/EL)
Social Concern Seminar: Migrant Experience
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar offers a unique immersion into the lives of migrant farm workers in Florida during the spring harvest.
 
CST 33968 / THEO 33968 / PSY 23852 / CSC 33968 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: L'Arche Community
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen
Credit Hours: 1
The L'Arche Seminar introduces students to the philosophy of Jean Vanier and to the model of service that his writings inspired. The class sessions leading up to the immersion will cover topics such as: Catholic Social Tradition and a framework for Solidarity; Spirituality lived in Community; Policy, Advocacy, and Discrimination; Vanier on Becoming Human. This is an invitation to think deeply about and observe directly a community (of people with and without disabilities) living together in the spirit of the beatitudes. Students will also witness how living in a L'Arche community has influenced the lives of the core members, assistants, and others. Students will likely have some opportunity to communicate with other organizations about their advocacy and policy work that relates to people with disabilities.
 
CST 33970 / THEO 33970 / CSC 33970 / CSC 63970 (CBL/EL)
Global Issues
Rachel Tomas Morgan
Credit Hours: 1
This course serves as the required orientation course for all THEO 33938: International Summer Service Learning Program participants. It will provide students with an introduction to international issues in developing countries through the lens of Catholic social tradition, guidance in independent country/area study, preparation and tools for cross-cultural service, opportunities for theological reflection, logistical information necessary for international programs and travel, and general support within the context of a community of colleagues. Students must attend the mandatory Cross-Cultural Orientation Retreat held on February 9-10, 2018. Other students doing summer internships in developing countries may take the course with permission from the instructor.

 

 

CONSTITUTIONAL STUDIES MINOR

CNST 40404 / AMST 30761 / ESS 40610 / GSC 40522 / GSC 60522 / HESB 40104 / HIST 30861 / IIPS 40921 / AFST 40711 (CBL)
Prisons and Policing in the U.S.
Pamela Butler
Credit Hours: 3
Scholars and activists use the concept of the ?carceral state? to describe the official, government use of policing, surveillance, and mass imprisonment to exercise control over society. This course examines the histories, cultures, politics, and economics of prisons and policing in the United States, in order to determine how the U.S. carceral state has been a factor in the social construction of race, gender, and citizenship. We will study the genealogy of the U.S. carceral state -- beginning with the surveillance embedded in the earliest practices of slavery and settler colonialism, tracing its development through the 19th and early 20th centuries, and concluding with the rise of the modern prison industrial complex. We will then focus on contemporary U.S. prisons, policing, and surveillance, using case studies including the ?war on drugs,? immigrant detention, sex-crime regulation, and police violence. Finally, we will consider alternatives to prisons and policing, as we learn about academic research and activist movements working to end state and police violence, abolish prisons, and create opportunities for restorative justice. Over the course of the semester, students will learn about the historical development and ongoing maintenance of the carceral state, using an intersectional framework that highlights the ways in which prisons and policing have both shaped, and been shaped by, race, gender, citizenship, and economics. Along the way, students will ask and address such questions as: How does the U.S. carceral state function as a tool for social control? What histories, policies, and ideologies underlie the carceral state? How have individuals and organizations worked to transform or abolish the carceral state? How have art and cultural production been used to normalize and/or critique the carceral state? And can we imagine a world without prisons or police?

 

 

EDUCATION

EDU 70120  (CBL)
Cultural Influences on Children's Lives
Instructor TBA
Credit Hours: 3
Scholars and activists use the concept of the ?carceral state? to describe the official, government use of policing, surveillance, and mass imprisonment to exercise control over society. This course examines the histories, cultures, politics, and economics of prisons and policing in the United States, in order to determine how the U.S. carceral state has been a factor in the social construction of race, gender, and citizenship.We will study the genealogy of the U.S. carceral state -- beginning with the surveillance embedded in the earliest practices of slavery and settler colonialism, tracing its development through the 19th and early 20th centuries, and concluding with the rise of the modern prison industrial complex. We will then focus on contemporary U.S. prisons, policing, and surveillance, using case studies including the ?war on drugs,? immigrant detention, sex-crime regulation, and police violence. Finally, we will consider alternatives to prisons and policing, as we learn about academic research and activist movements working to end state and police violence, abolish prisons, and create opportunities for restorative justice.Over the course of the semester, students will learn about the historical development and ongoing maintenance of the carceral state, using an intersectional framework that highlights the ways in which prisons and policing have both shaped, and been shaped by, race, gender, citizenship, and economics. Along the way, students will ask and address such questions as: How does the U.S. carceral state function as a tool for social control? What histories, policies, and ideologies underlie the carceral state? How have individuals and organizations worked to transform or abolish the carceral state? How have art and cultural production been used to normalize and/or critique the carceral state? And can we imagine a world without prisons or police?
 
 
 

EDUCATION, SCHOOLING, AND SOCIETY

ESS 20208 (EL)
Exploring Learning in Informal Environments
Mary-Geraldine Svarovsky
Credit Hours: 3
Informal learning environments--museums, zoos, after-school clubs, Citizen Science programs--provide a wealth of educational opportunities for people of all ages to pursue and cultivate a wide range of interests. Within these settings, learners often are free to choose the topics in which to immerse themselves and the extent to which they participate in given activities. This course will explore: 1) what learning looks like within different informal environments; 2) a variety of educational approaches commonly found in such environments; and 3) the role(s) that informal learning can play within a broader educational landscape. The class will take at least one field trip to a local informal learning space to observe and investigate learning within these environments firsthand.
 
ESS 23250 / ESS 33362 / PSY 23855 / CSC 23855 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten
Jay Brandenberger, Ellen Kyes
Credit Hours: 1
Take Ten is a research-based conflict resolution curriculum designed at the University of Notre Dame and headquartered at the University's Robinson Community Learning Center. Take Ten's mission is to provide youth with positive alternatives to violence and build their capacity to make more informed choices when faced with conflict. Take Ten volunteers work on a weekly basis with schoolchildren of all grades to teach them the skills needed to resolve conflict peacefully. Born as a restorative practice within the scope of a restorative justice lens, Take Ten has recently developed a method of teaching its curriculum in the Peacemaking Circles format as well as offering Talking Circles at some schools.Students participating in the Take Ten seminar will serve as Take Ten volunteers during the semester (February through May with training in January), being part of a team that works at a school in the area one time per week. The seminar itself will meet in the Peacemaking Circles format and will function as training for seminar students to become Circle facilitators. Readings and reflections will allow students to focus on understanding issues of youth and violence from various perspectives and to discuss their work in Circle.
 
ESS 30214 / CST 33301 / SOC 33001 / IIPS 33702 (CBL/EL)
Sociology, Self Catholic Social Tradition
Andrew Weigert
Credit Hours: 3
What's Catholic about sociology? What's sociological about Catholic Social Tradition? What does all this mean for sociology majors, what they study, and how this may affect their careers and lives after graduation? This course is a critical examination of the links between Catholic social thought and sociology as a discipline. We will engage these ideas through an experimental, team-taught seminar format. Readings will include core statements of Catholic social tradition, critiques thereof, and autobiographical essays written by sociologists and others who are dedicated to social justice. An experiential community-based learning dimension is a requirement for this course. All students are to make at least 10 two-hour weekly visits to the Center for the Homeless in South Bend and write a seven page account of their experiences indicating what they learned or wish they had learned and how their experiences impacted their thinking about Catholic Social Tradition.
 
ESS 30611 (CBL)
Tutoring in the Community
Nancy Masters
Credit Hours: 1
ESS 30611 is a one credit seminar for students who are tutoring in the South Bend community. This seminar will provide tutors with an opportunity to explore the social, economic, and cultural forces that influence the lives of their students. Tutoring in the Community will give tutors the tools they need to analyze beliefs and pedagogy, improve instruction, and foster development in South Bend school children in need.
 
ESS 33362 / ESS 23250 / PSY 23855 / CSC 23855 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten
Jay Brandenberger, Ellen Kyes
Credit Hours: 1
Take Ten is a research-based conflict resolution curriculum designed at the University of Notre Dame and headquartered at the University's Robinson Community Learning Center. Take Ten's mission is to provide youth with positive alternatives to violence and build their capacity to make more informed choices when faced with conflict. Take Ten volunteers work on a weekly basis with schoolchildren of all grades to teach them the skills needed to resolve conflict peacefully. Born as a restorative practice within the scope of a restorative justice lens, Take Ten has recently developed a method of teaching its curriculum in the Peacemaking Circles format as well as offering Talking Circles at some schools.Students participating in the Take Ten seminar will serve as Take Ten volunteers during the semester (February through May with training in January), being part of a team that works at a school in the area one time per week. The seminar itself will meet in the Peacemaking Circles format and will function as training for seminar students to become Circle facilitators. Readings and reflections will allow students to focus on understanding issues of youth and violence from various perspectives and to discuss their work in Circle.
 
ESS 33613 / AMST 30467 / HIST 33613 (CBL)
History of American Indian Education
Brian Collier
Credit Hours: 3
This course blends the History of Education and American Indian History and is open (by invitation only) to students interested in action research on these two topics. The course may include an opportunity to collaborate on a project with a school that is part of the Native mission network schools and may include travel to a Native community. The course is by invitation only as it has an outcome opportunity of a conference in September 2016.
 
ESS 40263 / PSY 23271 / PSY 43271 (CBL/EL)
Autism Spectrum Disorder IW
Kristin Wier
Credit Hours: 3
This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct educational programs with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) while acquiring an in-depth knowledge of the individual, family, community, and cultural issues surrounding the diagnosis. For the practicum portion of the course, students will work within a structured program in a family home, on-average two times a weeks for at least four hours (50 hours over the course of the semester). For the in-class portion of the course, students will meet with the instructors to discuss current research/readings, important topics, and personal experiences related to ASD. It is our hope that through this course you will begin to gain an understanding of individuals with ASD and acquire the skills to support them and their families. In addition, you will continue to develop the communication skills (written and oral) that are crucial to be a successful professional in the field of developmental disabilities. Please note that a version of this course is offered at the 40000 level which has a significant writing requirement (and has additional required coursework, see listing). Other requirements: Unless other arrangements are made, students need to have a car or regular access to transportation. Access to a car can be arranged through the Center for Social Concerns.
 
ESS 40610 / CNST 40404 / AMST 30761 / GSC 40522 / GSC 60522 / HESB 40104 / HIST 30861 / IIPS 40921 (CBL)
Prisons and Policing in the U.S.
Pamela Butler
Credit Hours: 3
Scholars and activists use the concept of the ?carceral state? to describe the official, government use of policing, surveillance, and mass imprisonment to exercise control over society. This course examines the histories, cultures, politics, and economics of prisons and policing in the United States, in order to determine how the U.S. carceral state has been a factor in the social construction of race, gender, and citizenship. We will study the genealogy of the U.S. carceral state -- beginning with the surveillance embedded in the earliest practices of slavery and settler colonialism, tracing its development through the 19th and early 20th centuries, and concluding with the rise of the modern prison industrial complex. We will then focus on contemporary U.S. prisons, policing, and surveillance, using case studies including the ?war on drugs,? immigrant detention, sex-crime regulation, and police violence. Finally, we will consider alternatives to prisons and policing, as we learn about academic research and activist movements working to end state and police violence, abolish prisons, and create opportunities for restorative justice. Over the course of the semester, students will learn about the historical development and ongoing maintenance of the carceral state, using an intersectional framework that highlights the ways in which prisons and policing have both shaped, and been shaped by, race, gender, citizenship, and economics. Along the way, students will ask and address such questions as: How does the U.S. carceral state function as a tool for social control? What histories, policies, and ideologies underlie the carceral state? How have individuals and organizations worked to transform or abolish the carceral state? How have art and cultural production been used to normalize and/or critique the carceral state? And can we imagine a world without prisons or police?
 
ESS 43203 / AFST 43700 / AMST 30465 /ILS 40004 (CBL)
Youth Empowerment, Literacy, Urban Schools
McKenna, Maria Greene, Stuart
Credit Hours: 3
This course examines youth experiences in a changing urban landscape affected by gentrification, school choice, and disinvestment in low-income minority neighborhoods. We will examine how youth make sense of their lived environments, develop a sense of identity within the context of family and community, and struggle to find safe spaces where they can flourish. To understand key concepts in the course, we will read studies that focus on youth empowerment and the extent to which rich literate experiences and art provide youth with multiple opportunities to develop a sense of personal agency that can foster civic participation and action. To ground our critical analysis of urban landscapes, students will participate in an offsite community-based learning (CBL) project with local youth through a partnership with the Neighborhood Resource Corporation, Notre Dame's new Center for Arts and Culture (http://artsandculture.nd.edu/), and the Robinson Community Learning Center. Please note: Additional out of class time will be required for this class.
 
 
 

HESBURGH PROGRAM IN PUBLIC SERVICE

HESB 33101 / CSC 33972 / IIPS 50703 / IIPS 63205 / ESS 33363  (CBL/EL)
Restorative Justice
Susan Sharpe
Credit Hours: 3
Restorative justice is gaining visibility in contemporary social justice efforts. Advocates of change, ranging from parents to police, from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops to the cofounders of Black Lives Matter, are claiming restorative justice as an important way forward in making our institutions more just and more effective. This course will give students an understanding of how and why that potential exists, and teach them the basics of a primary restorative justice practice. Students will learn the fundamentals of Circle dialogue, situating it in the context of relevant theoretic frameworks and in the context of key restorative justice applications (including criminal justice, education, and systemic injustice). Students will be encouraged to search for potential applications of restorative justice theory and practice in the professional fields they anticipate entering. This will be a community-based learning course, requiring each student to perform 20 hours of work in the local community at pre-arranged sites as part of the course, in addition to regular reading and writing assignments.
 
HESB 34093 (EL)
Washington DC Internship 
Thomas Kellenberg
Credit Hours 3
While in Washington, all students participate in experiential education through an internship. Internships are selected and secured by the students, with the assistance of the ND campus director of the Washington Program and the ND Career Center.
 
HESB 40104 / ESS 40610 / CNST 40404 / AMST 30761 / GSC 40522 / GSC 60522 / HIST 30861 / IIPS 40921  /  AFST 40711(CBL)
Prisons and Policing in the U.S.
Pamela Butler
Credit Hours: 3
Scholars and activists use the concept of the ?carceral state? to describe the official, government use of policing, surveillance, and mass imprisonment to exercise control over society. This course examines the histories, cultures, politics, and economics of prisons and policing in the United States, in order to determine how the U.S. carceral state has been a factor in the social construction of race, gender, and citizenship. We will study the genealogy of the U.S. carceral state -- beginning with the surveillance embedded in the earliest practices of slavery and settler colonialism, tracing its development through the 19th and early 20th centuries, and concluding with the rise of the modern prison industrial complex. We will then focus on contemporary U.S. prisons, policing, and surveillance, using case studies including the ?war on drugs,? immigrant detention, sex-crime regulation, and police violence. Finally, we will consider alternatives to prisons and policing, as we learn about academic research and activist movements working to end state and police violence, abolish prisons, and create opportunities for restorative justice. Over the course of the semester, students will learn about the historical development and ongoing maintenance of the carceral state, using an intersectional framework that highlights the ways in which prisons and policing have both shaped, and been shaped by, race, gender, citizenship, and economics. Along the way, students will ask and address such questions as: How does the U.S. carceral state function as a tool for social control? What histories, policies, and ideologies underlie the carceral state? How have individuals and organizations worked to transform or abolish the carceral state? How have art and cultural production been used to normalize and/or critique the carceral state? And can we imagine a world without prisons or police?
 
 
How do people in immigrant-receiving countries shape their attitudes toward immigrants? What are the differences between refugees and other migrants? How is immigration related to urban "immigrant riots?" And what can anthropological studies of borders and national policies tell us about the transnational world in which we live? We will examine these and related questions, and more generally the causes, lived experiences, and consequences of migration. We will acquire a sound understanding of migration in its social, political, legal, and cultural facets. Fieldwork accounts from countries of origin and from the U.S., Europe, Australia, and Japan will enable us to appreciate both global and U.S. distinctive trends. Rather than merely learning a collection of facts about immigrants, we will address how migration intersects with gender and class, the mass media, border enforcement, racism, the economy, territory and identity formation, and religion. 
 
 
 
 

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

IDS 33100 / ANTH  33314 / ASIA  30305 / IIPS  30927 / LAST  30004 (CBL/CBR /EL) 
Immigration Global Perspective
Maurizio Albahari
Credit hours: 3
How do people in immigrant-receiving countries shape their attitudes toward immigrants? What are the differences between refugees and other migrants? How is immigration related to urban "immigrant riots?" And what can anthropological studies of borders and national policies tell us about the transnational world in which we live? We will examine these and related questions, and more generally the causes, lived experiences, and consequences of migration. We will acquire a sound understanding of migration in its social, political, legal, and cultural facets. Fieldwork accounts from countries of origin and from the U.S., Europe, Australia, and Japan will enable us to appreciate both global and U.S. distinctive trends. Rather than merely learning a collection of facts about immigrants, we will address how migration intersects with gender and class, the mass media, border enforcement, racism, the economy, territory and identity formation, and religion. 
 

 

 

POVERTY STUDIES

PS 35002 (CBR)
Experiential Learning-Internship
Connie Mick
Credit Hours: Variable
Students electing to fulfill the experiential learning requirement through internships in the community (Option B) may do so by enrolling in PS 35002. Students must complete 3 credits total, but may do so in one, two, or three separate internships with corresponding credit, enrolling in PS 35002 each semester they are participating in an internship, or in the Fall semester if the internship takes place over the summer. Students will determine credit value with their internship advisor and a Poverty Studies director. For 3 credits, a student must complete 80 to 100 hours total during one semester or approximately 8 to 10 hours per week for 10 weeks, including time at the site and with the internship advisor. A 2-credit internship requires 50 to 70 total hours (or 5-7 hours for 10 weeks) and a 1-credit internship would involve 30 to 50 total hours (or 3-5 hours for 10 weeks). Students may arrange to intern for more or less than 10 weeks during the semester they are enrolled in PS 35002 and can adjust the weekly hours to correspond to the required total.
 
PS 43000 
Capstone Seminar: Poverty Studies
Connie Mick
Credit Hours: 3
The Capstone Seminar will be topic-oriented drawing on literature from multiple disciplines. The students themselves will be from different majors and will share both the perspectives of their major disciplines as well as their varied experiences in the field thus ensuring that interdisciplinary nature of the inquiry. Experts with diverse perspectives and professional experiences will join the seminar as special guests.

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY

SUS 20010 (see. 1-3) / POLS 40490 / IDS 20997
Sustainability: Principle & Practice
Debra Javelin, John Sitter
Credit Hours: 3
This interdisciplinary course explores the challenges of environmental sustainability through social, economic, scientific, and ethical lenses. Taught jointly by professors from the natural sciences, humanities, and social sciences, the course aims to instill broad, integrative and critical thinking about global environmental problems whose solutions will depend on multidisciplinary approaches. This gateway course to the Minor in Sustainability is open to all students interested in a deep exploration of these critical issues. Students considering the Minor in Sustainability are encouraged to take this course during their sophomore year.
 
SUS 33302 / ANTH 33302 / ANTH 63315 / STV 33302 (EL)
Animal Encounters
Natalie Porter
Credit Hours: 3
How do animals relate to non-human animals across cultures? Does culture make a difference in how humans relate to animals and the natural world? What are the roles that animals play in different societies - as food, as religious figures, as companions, as kin, as laborers? From its origins as a discipline, anthropology has examined human-animal relations in a variety of social and geographic settings. This course will review some of the classic examples of cross-cultural relations with animals, and bring these examples into conversation with current debates about race and classification, animal ethics, biotechnology, and food politics. Students will engage with texts, films,and other media from anthropology as well as philosophy, history, and feminist science studies. We will approach these materials from an anthropological perspective that focuses on how our diverse and dynamic expressions of identity and culture shape, and are shaped by, how we engage with other species - whether as beings to think with, live with, love, kill, and/or consume.
 
 

MENDOZA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

ACCOUNTANCY

ACCT 40660 / ACCT 40670 (CBL/ EL)
Tax Assistance Program
Kenneth Milani
Credit Hours: 2
Preparation of federal and state income tax returns for low-income individuals.
 
ACCT 40670 / ACCT 40660 (CBL/EL)
Tax Assistance Program
Kenneth Milani
Credit Hours: 2
Preparation of federal and state income tax returns for low-income individuals.
 
ACCT 40790 (CBL)
Accounting and Reporting for Not-for-Profit Organizations
Douglas Kroll
Credit Hours: 3
To introduce students to the accounting practices of fund accounting as it relates to governmental and not-for-profit organizations. The class will also provide a basic understanding of these entities to students who will either work in the not-for-profit sector or who will be exposed to them in public accounting. The class will be both theory and practice oriented.
 
ACCT 70691 (CBL/EL)
Income Taxation/International  Individuals
Kenneth Milani
Credit Hours: 3
United States tax laws that apply to international individuals provide these taxpayers with advantages and disadvantages when compared to the typical U.S. citizen. This course will examine the advantages (e.g., treatment of exemptions, loss of deductions and/or credits) in the context of tax compliance, tax planning and tax strategies for an international individual. Students enrolled in this course will participate in the Tax Assistance Program counseling for taxpayers and aiding them in the tax compliance process or become involved in some other type of supervised field project involving foreign taxpayers.
 
 
 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION—SC

BASC 20200 (sec. 1-4) / MGTO 20100 (sec.1-4)
Principles of Management
Christopher Stevens
Credit Hours: 3
A study of the management process, including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. Emphasis is placed on executive leadership, organizational behavior, and management theory.

 

 

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, ANALYTICS, AND OPERATIONS

ITAO 40660 (sec. 1-3) (CBL/ EL)
IT Project Management
Christopher Corrente
Credit Hours: 1.5
Whether you become a high-profile real estate developer, an investment banker, or an entrepreneur, in any career you'll need some project management skills to get your job done. Everyone tries to get projects finished on time and under budget, but many critical business projects fail anyway. We'll learn the steps associated with successful project management, examine some optimization techniques, learn how to use the software tools that enhance productivity, and discuss how to avoid the implementation pitfalls that cause good people doing good projects to fail.
 
ITAO 70930 (EL)
Lean Six Sigma
Scott Siler
Credit Hours: 1.5
At the most fundamental level, no organization can enjoy sustainable success unless it does one thing: meet or exceed its customers' needs and expectations. Lean Six Sigma is a disciplined, customer-centric, data-driven approach that provides tools to understand your customer, to measure how well you are satisfying your customers' needs, and to determine how you can satisfy these needs better, faster, and more cost effectively. This course will provide a deep dive into the Lean Six Sigma DMAIC methodology through a blended learning approach consisting of online learning, classroom lecture/discussion, online simulations, and a real-world project. Through the successful completion of this course (including the online materials/tests, the final project, and the final certification exam), you will earn your Lean Six Sigma Greenbelt certification.

 

MANAGEMENT

MGTO 20100 (sec.1-4) / BASC 20200 (sec. 1-4)
Principles of Management
Christopher Stevens
Credit Hours: 3
A study of the management process, including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. Emphasis is placed on executive leadership, organizational behavior, and management theory.

 

MGTO 30310  (sec. 1-3) (CBL )
Innovation and Design Thinking
Wendy Angst
Credit Hours: 3
As the challenges and opportunities facing society and businesses grow more complex, and as stakeholders grow more diverse, organizations are increasingly seeking innovative ways to create and capture value. In this course we will explore organization-centered methods of innovation while gaining proficiency in human-centered methods of innovation through an approach known as "design thinking". Students will work in teams and consult with a client throughout the semester to apply design thinking - a systematic application of ethnographical research, ideation, prototyping, and customer co-creation - to develop innovations grounded in the client user's current and future needs.

 

 

MARKETING

MARK 30120 (CBR)
Marketing Research
Instructor TBA
Credit Hours: 3
Required for all marketing majors. A study of the application of scientific method to the definition and solution of marketing problems with attention to research design, sampling theory, methods of data collection and the use of statistical techniques in the data analysis.
 

MARK 40100 (sec. 1-3)

Strategic Marketing
Robert Essig
Credit Hours: 3
The development and implementation of marketing programs, including determining the marketing mission within the context of environmental factors and organizational resources. Working in teams, students develop comprehensive business plans and compete in a computer-based market simulation.
 

 

Microeconomic Analysis

MBAE 70634 (EL)
Strategic Planning for Growth
Michael Mannor
Credit Hours: 1.5
Introduces concepts of strategy development, business integration, and problem solving; frameworks to assist in framing threats/opportunities, problem diagnosis, solution development, and recommendation implementation. We will practice using these integrative frameworks to facilitate problem solving in multiple business cases from identification of problem, to recommendation, to implementation plan. Cases emphasize different aspects of problem solving and integration including: microeconomics, game theory, finance, market estimation and competitor assessment, customer segmentation and economics, product pricing, positioning and branding, and operations. Students will bring all the concepts together in the development of a business plan.

 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

 

 

CIVIL ENGINEERING

CE 35620 (CBL/EL)
Community-Based Engaged Design Project
Jay Brockman
Credit Hours: 3
The most critical engineering challenges of our time require innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to create human-centered solutions. Through this project-based course, students will learn different methods to approach these problems and will gain real engineering experience by tackling current challenges here in South Bend. Students will work on semester long projects with Notre Dame faculty and leaders in the South Bend community in a small, collaborative environment, providing opportunities for mentorship and professional development. Project topics may include, but are not limited to, water management, data analytics, internet of things, and app development. At the end of the semester, students will use feedback on the pilot project to make recommendations to the partner organization for project execution on a larger scale. Please contact Maria Krug at mkrug1@nd.edu for more details about the course.
 
CE 40702 (CBL/EL)
Senior Design
Elizabeth Kerr, Eric Horvath
Credit Hours: 3
The second semester of an integrated civil engineering design experience. Student teams will work closely with industry professionals and faculty who act as consultants on a real-world design project to facilitate the student's understanding of the students' proposed final designs. This semester will culminate in a final design project including a report, drawings, and presentation.
 
CE 45610 (CBL/EL)
Engineering for International Development I
Tracy Kijewski-Correa
Credit Hours: Variable
Engineering for International Development I Engineering for International Development I partners students with community organizations to put their engineering skills into service, in this case Bridges2Prosperity, a nonprofit organization providing pedestrian bridges to communities worldwide who lack such basic infrastructure. Under the banner of the ND SEED (Notre Dame Students Empowering Engineering Development), up to a dozen students will be accepted each academic year for this course and will supervise all aspects of bridge design and construction, including fundraising and international study via site surveys over Fall Break and construction in May following the spring semester. To join this course in the fall of any academic year, students must apply and be accepted by ND SEED in the prior spring semester. Students are expected to participate in the course for a full academic year, through bridge construction in May. The project is also affiliated with the Center for Social Concerns International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP) and has additional curricular requirements through ISSLP.
 
CE 45620 (CBL/EL)
Engineering for  International  Development II
Tracy Kijewski-Correa, Alexandros Taflanidis
Credit Hours: Variable
Engineering for International Development II partners students with community organizations to put their engineering skills into service, in this case students work with Engineering2Empower (E2E). E2E started as an organization committed to exploring new approaches and solutions to the Haitian urban housing problem. Through its work with various university and non-university partners, the organization has broadened its focus to seek holistic solutions to hazard mitigation in developing settings. Undergraduate students lead all facets of Research and Development for the organization through this course, focusing on prototype frame and panel design and construction/production for the housing solutions promoted, but also programming for Community Awareness and Engagement. Through partnerships with the Kellogg Institute, students have the opportunity, on a case by case basis, to travel to Haiti to directly implement their work.
 

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

CSE 20600 (sec. 2-4) / CSE 40600 (sec. 4) (CBL/CBR)
CSE Service Projects
Jay Brockman, Gregory Madey, Shreya Kumar
Credit Hours: Variable
Engineering projects in community service.
 
CSE 40424 (CBL)
Human-Computer Interaction
Ronald Metoyer
Credit Hours: 3
You will engage in an in-depth exploration of the field of Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) including its history, goals, principles, methodologies, successes, failures, open problems, and emerging areas. Broad topics include theories of interaction (e.g., conceptual models, stages of execution, error analysis, constraints, memory by affordances), design methods (e.g., user-centered design, task analysis, prototyping tools), visual design principles (e.g., visual communication, digital typography, color, motion), evaluation techniques (e.g., heuristic evaluations, model-based evaluations), and emerging topics (e.g., affective computing, natural user interfaces, brain-computer interfaces).
 
CSE 40600 (sec. 4) / CSE 20600 (sec. 2-4) (CBL/CBR)
CSE Service Projects
Jay Brockman, Gregory Madey, Shreya Kumar
Credit Hours: Variable
Engineering projects in community service.

 

LAW SCHOOL

LAW SCHOOL

LAW 70726 (CBL)
Applied Mediation
Michael Jenuwine, Anne Hamilton
Credit Hours: 5
This course is open to second- and third-year law students interested in providing mediation services to individuals currently litigating disputes in the courts of St. Joseph and surrounding counties. Through this course, students will have the opportunity to serve as mediators in actual cases involving both civil and domestic relations matters, including child custody, support, parenting time, landlord-tenant disputes, contract disputes, and other matters referred by the courts for mediation. The classroom component of the course will focus on the development of mediation skills and exploration of advanced mediation topics.
 
LAW 70728 (CBL)
Applied Mediation II
Michael Jenuwine, Anne Hamilton
Credit Hours: Variable
Allows students who have satisfactorily completed Applied Mediation to progress to more advanced mediation skills as specifically applied to domestic relations cases. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.
 
LAW 70730 (CBL)
Immigration Externship Instruc
Lisa Koop, Anne Hamilton
Credit Hours: 1
Four NDLS students will have the opportunity to practice immigration law under the supervision of an experienced NIJC immigration attorney by providing immigration legal services to low-income immigrants in Indiana through NIJC. NIJC will select, screen and house all cases handled through this externship. Students will meet as a class once a week for one hour of instruction on substantive immigration law and lawyering skills, guided discussion and case review. Students will spend an additional eight hours each week conducting case work. Students will handle the representation of one or more NIJC clients and seek immigration benefits before federal agencies and courts. Students will conduct initial intake interviews, identify client eligibility for immigration benefits, complete immigration applications, compile supporting documentation and write legal memoranda. There are no required courses students must take in advance of participating in this externship. However, Administrative Law (70315), Advanced Legal Research (70207), Appellate Advocacy Seminar (73314), Immigration Law (70301), and Introduction to International Human Rights (70417) are recommended. Registration is by permission only. Interested students should submit a cover letter, resume and informal transcript to Lisa Koop at LKoop@heartalliance.org.
 
LAW 70736 (CBL)
Lawyering Practice Instruction
Robert Jones, Anne Hamilton
Credit Hours: 1
The Lawyering Practice Externship Course allows students to perform 8-12 hours of legal work per week in any court, governmental agency, nonprofit organization, or in-house corporate counsel office while participating in a companion weekly seminar. Students earn three credits (two of which are fieldwork credits) for an eight hour weekly field placement or four credits (three of which are fieldwork credits) for a 12 hour weekly field placement. Placements must involve substantial legal work under the careful supervision of an attorney or judge. Placements are typically in the Michiana area, but students are free to choose placements in other regional cities including Chicago and Indianapolis. Students may not choose placements already offered in existing local externship courses (St. Joseph County Public Defender, South Bend office of the National Immigrant Justice Center, Notre Dame Athletic Department or athletics compliance within Notre Dame's General Counsel's Office). All placements must be approved by the instructor and must be finalized before a student may enroll in the course.
 
LAW 75721 Sec. 1 (CBL)
Economic Justice Clinic I
Judith Fox, Anne Hamilton
Credit Hours: 5
This is a 5-credit, letter-graded course providing training in basic lawyering skills, including interviewing and counseling, as well as ethics, substantive law and procedural law relevant to the representation of clients in litigation and transactions. Students represent clients under the close supervision of a clinical faculty member. The case types vary somewhat among the sections, as described below. The classroom component of the course uses a combined lecture and mock exercise format. Students are sometimes required to participate in a community education presentation. Pre- or co-requisite: Professional Responsibility (LAW 70807 or LAW 70808)
 
LAW 75721 Sec. 2 (CBL)
Community Development Clinic I
James Kelly, Anne Hamilton
Credit Hours: 5
This is a 5-credit, letter-graded course providing training in basic lawyering skills, including interviewing and counseling, as well as ethics, substantive law and procedural law relevant to the representation of clients in litigation and transactions. Students represent clients under the close supervision of a clinical faculty member. The case types vary somewhat among the sections, as described below. The classroom component of the course uses a combined lecture and mock exercise format. Students are sometimes required to participate in a community education presentation. Pre- or co-requisite: Professional Responsibility (LAW 70807 or LAW 70808)
 
LAW 75723 (CBL/EL)
Economic Justice Clinic II
Judith Fox, Anne Hamilton
Credit Hours: Variable
Variable credit and letter-graded course open to students who have satisfactorily completed Clinic I. Clinic II allows students to progress to more advanced lawyering skills. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.
 
LAW 75724 (CBL)
Intellectual Property and the Entrepreneurial Law Clinic
Joanne Clifford, Anne Hamilton
Credit Hours: 5
The Intellectual Property and Entrepreneurship Clinic is a 5-credit, letter-graded course providing training in basic lawyering skills, including interviewing and counseling, as well as substantive law. The classroom component of the course uses an interactive approach including lectures and mock lawyering exercises. Through this course student will work directly with clients on intellectual property issues, such as patentability searches and provisional patent applications, trademark searches and registration, as well as intellectual property license issues and agreements.
 
LAW 75733 (CBL)
Public Defender Externship
Gerard Bradley, Anne Hamilton, Gloria Krull
Credit Hours: 1
Involves assisting actual public defenders in representing indigent clients at the St. Joseph County Courthouse-Trial and Misdemeanor Division. Students can expect to represent clients in many capacities, some of which include: negotiating plea bargains with prosecutors; preparing and conducting bench trials; interviewing and subpoenaing witnesses; writing and filing discovery motions; and other activities within the administration of justice. Students are expected to work at the courthouse one full morning or afternoon each week. Besides the courtroom experience, students must attend class sessions once per week that feature prosecutors, police officers, public defenders, judges and probation officers lecturing on their duties as officers of the court. Enrollment: limited each semester at the discretion of the instructor.
 
LAW 75734 (CBL/EL)
Immigration Externship
Lisa Koop, Anne Hamilton
Credit Hours: 2
Four NDLS students will have the opportunity to practice immigration law under the supervision of an experienced NIJC immigration attorney by providing immigration legal services to low-income immigrants in Indiana through NIJC. NIJC will select, screen and house all cases handled through this externship. Students will meet as a class once a week for one hour of instruction on substantive immigration law and lawyering skills, guided discussion and case review. Students will spend an additional eight hours each week conducting case work. Students will handle the representation of one or more NIJC clients and seek immigration benefits before federal agencies and courts. Students will conduct initial intake interviews, identify client eligibility for immigration benefits, complete immigration applications, compile supporting documentation and write legal memoranda. There are no required courses students must take in advance of participating in this externship. However, Administrative Law (70315), Advanced Legal Research (70207), Appellate Advocacy Seminar (73314), Immigration Law (70301), and Introduction to International Human Rights (70417) are recommended. Registration is by permission only. Interested students should submit a cover letter, resume and informal transcript to Lisa Koop at LKoop@heartalliance.org.
 
LAW 75736 (CBL/EL)
Lawyering Externship Fieldwork
Robert Jones, Anne Hamilton
Credit Hours: Variable
The Lawyering Practice Externship Course allows students to perform 8-12 hours of legal work per week in any court, governmental agency, nonprofit organization, or in-house corporate counsel office while participating in a companion weekly seminar. Students earn three credits (two of which are fieldwork credits) for an eight hour weekly field placement or four credits (three of which are fieldwork credits) for a 12 hour weekly field placement. Placements must involve substantial legal work under the careful supervision of an attorney or judge. Placements are typically in the Michiana area, but students are free to choose placements in other regional cities including Chicago and Indianapolis. Students may not choose placements already offered in existing local externship courses (St. Joseph County Public Defender, South Bend office of the National Immigrant Justice Center, Notre Dame Athletic Department or athletics compliance within Notre Dame's General Counsel's Office). All placements must be approved by the instructor and must be finalized before a student may enroll in the course.
 
LAW 75800 (CBL/EL)
Appalachia Externship
Robert Jones, Melissa Marley Bonnichsen, Anne Hamilton
Credit Hours: 1
The Appalachia Externship is a one credit academic externship. Students spend their fall break or spring break providing pro bono legal services at the Appalachian Research and Defense Fund of Kentucky (AppalReD), which is the federal and state-funded low income legal services provider for the Appalachian region of Kentucky. Students also participate in the Appalachia Seminar sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns, which involves several classroom sessions, reading assignments, and written assignments exploring the culture and social issues of the Appalachia region, as well as Catholic Social Teaching. This course does not meet the Skills Requirement.
 
LAW 75908 (CBL/EL)
Intercollegiate Athletics Externship
Edmund Edmonds
Credit Hours: 2
The Intercollegiate Externship will provide an opportunity for law students to gain practical experience and academic credit in intercollegiate athletics administration through a classroom component taught by Law School faculty and senior-level administrator-attorneys from Athletics and via non-classroom externship work. Potential duties include reviewing contracts; assisting in the creation and revision of departmental policy; researching legal issues related to athletics; researching compliance issues; drafting, reviewing and revising compliance education materials; and auditing eligibility and other compliance-related forms.

 

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

BIOS 40450  (CBL/EL)
Clinical Research Rare Neglected Diseases
Kasturi Haldar, Barbara Calhoun
Credit Hours: 3
A main purpose of this course is to engage upper level undergraduate and graduate students in clinical research in rare and neglected diseases. The focus for each semester is on neglected/infectious diseases with emphasis on worldwide eradication strategies. A major goal is to have Notre Dame students work on a clinical research project in class on some rare and/or neglected disease of major importance. A second important goal of this course is to develop an analogous model(s) for other neglected/infectious diseases. We hope this class will also help the students become advocates for these diseases. The course is also tied to a clinical-translational seminar series to enable students to meet with leading international experts who work in neglected diseases. The class is intended for juniors and seniors.
 
 
 
 

SCIENCE (NON-DEPARTMENTAL)

 

SC 33902 / CSC 33902/ STV 33902 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Science Policy Ethics
Lantz, Kyle Carter, Clarence
Credit Hours: 1
Offered jointly with the College of Science, this Social Concerns Seminar will examine ethical responsibilities within science funding allocations and the regulation of basic and translational research. In the framework of Catholic Social Teaching, students will explore science policy development, government funding for science, and the regulation of both basic science and translational research, including special concerns for neglected disease and global health research. The course aims to explore how and why the government invests in research, how those funds are distributed to scientists, and ultimately how new discoveries are translated to new technologies, ultimately for the good of the general public. Working with Notre Dame's Federal Relations Team in Washington, D.C. over spring break, students will meet with scientists, multiple federal agencies, and policy makers. In preparation for meetings in Washington, 5 panel sessions will feature speakers with experience in research ethics and integrity, advocating for funding for science, distributing those funds, or working at the intersections of government policy, basic science, physics and engineering technology, environmental science, and clinical and translational research. This course poses a unique opportunity for students to network with various federal funding agencies and policymakers in Washington, D.C. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.
 
SC 41171 (CBL/EL)
Instrumentation, and Science Education
Goodenough-Lashua, DeeAnne
Credit Hours: 3
Students will gain laboratory and troubleshooting skills by testing donated laboratory instrumentation and developing a high school level science experiment utilizing the instrumentation. Students will be mentored by the faculty member and will be contributing to the ND LIGHTS (Laboratory Instrumentation Giving Hope To Students) donation program. ND LIGHTS acquires upgraded/retired instruments from ND laboratories and donates them to resource-limited schools. The program includes the key component of training high school science teacher recipients on how to use the instrument within the context of an experiment that can be incorporated into his/her curriculum. Students participating in this course will learn to test and write protocols for the donated scientific instrumentation, search scientific literature to determine an appropriate experiment for the laboratory instrument, and perform the experiment. Students will be expected to write a report summarizing their work at the end of the semester.
 
 
 

SCIENCE PRE-PROFESSIONAL STUDIES

SCPP 46397
Directed Readings-Poverty  Medicine
Instructor: TBA
Credits: 1
Permission required. Readings focus on learning how patients, families, and healthcare professionals experience illness and healing, how the stories that patients tell become the basis for diagnosis and therapeutic response, what it's like to go through medical training and grow in identity as a physician, and the nature of the doctor-patient relationship and how it is changing. Fall and spring. Note: This course counts as a general elective.

 

 
 

 

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND VALUES

STV 33302 / ANTH 33302 / ANTH 63315 / SUS 33302 (EL)
Animal Encounters
Natalie Porter
Credit Hours: 3
How do animals relate to non-human animals across cultures? Does culture make a difference in how humans relate to animals and the natural world? What are the roles that animals play in different societies - as food, as religious figures, as companions, as kin, as laborers? From its origins as a discipline, anthropology has examined human-animal relations in a variety of social and geographic settings. This course will review some of the classic examples of cross-cultural relations with animals, and bring these examples into conversation with current debates about race and classification, animal ethics, biotechnology, and food politics. Students will engage with texts, films,and other media from anthropology as well as philosophy, history, and feminist science studies. We will approach these materials from an anthropological perspective that focuses on how our diverse and dynamic expressions of identity and culture shape, and are shaped by, how we engage with other species - whether as beings to think with, live with, love, kill, and/or consume.
 
STV 33902 / CSC 33902 / SC 33902 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminars: Science Policy Ethics
Kyle Lantz, Clarence Carter
Credit Hours: 1
Offered jointly with the College of Science, this Social Concerns Seminar will examine ethical responsibilities within science funding allocations and the regulation of basic and translational research. In the framework of Catholic Social Teaching, students will explore science policy development, government funding for science, and the regulation of both basic science and translational research, including special concerns for neglected disease and global health research. The course aims to explore how and why the government invests in research, how those funds are distributed to scientists, and ultimately how new discoveries are translated to new technologies, ultimately for the good of the general public. Working with Notre Dame's Federal Relations Team in Washington, D.C. over spring break, students will meet with scientists, multiple federal agencies, and policy makers. In preparation for meetings in Washington, 5 panel sessions will feature speakers with experience in research ethics and integrity, advocating for funding for science, distributing those funds, or working at the intersections of government policy, basic science, physics and engineering technology, environmental science, and clinical and translational research. This course poses a unique opportunity for students to network with various federal funding agencies and policymakers in Washington, D.C. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

ARCH 40312 / ARCH 60312 / PSY 33685 / PSY 60685
Social Factors & Sustainability: Effects of the Built Environment on Health & Well-Being
Kimberly Rollings
Credit Hours: 3
This course focuses on the interaction between people and the physical environment on human health, well-being, behavior, and sustainability. Social and physical factors across multiple scales - from specific environments (residential, educational, work, healthcare, and commercial), urban and natural settings, to the planet - are explored. Issues of public health, environmental justice, universal design, and culture are included throughout. Lecture and discussion class with hands-on assignments and quizzes. Upper level undergraduate and graduate students from across the University and especially in architecture, the sustainability minor, design, pre-professional studies, social sciences, and business are encouraged to enroll.
 
ARCH 41121
Design VI
John Onyango
Credit Hours: 6
Design VI presents students with the opportunity to select one among a number of studio options. Specific focus of studios varies from year to year and is designed to address needs and specific to each fourth-year class.
 
ARCH 53411
History of American Architecture 1630-1915
John Stamper
Credit Hours: 3
This course is seminar on the history of architecture in the United States from the colonial period in the 1600s until World War I. The purpose of this course is to introduce some of the formative ideas, major monuments, and characteristic experiences of different building cultures in the United States and to investigate various problems of interpretation raised by the material under review. Architecture will be defined in the broadest possible terms to include vernacular as well as high architecture examples of buildings, distinctive urban configurations, and landscape design. Architectural History will be defined as the record of the rich diversity of human experiences evident in the different ways Americans have shaped the built environment to pursue social, civil, and religious ends. By the end of the semester, students should have an understanding of the cultural and historical factors that shaped American architecture from 1630 to 1915 and should have the ability to identify and distinguish between the different styles and periods of architecture from this period. They should have the research skills to prepare scholarly and theoretical papers and essays on the subject, and they will have experience with in-class presentations on topics related to their research.Course requirements consist of attendance at seminars, completion of required readings and writing assignments.
 
ARCH 60312 / ARCH 40312 / PSY 33685 / PSY 60685  
Social Factors & Sustainability: Effects of the Built Environment on Health & Well-Being
Kimberly Rollings
Credit Hours: 3
This course focuses on the interaction between people and the physical environment on human health, well-being, behavior, and sustainability. Social and physical factors across multiple scales - from specific environments (residential, educational, work, healthcare, and commercial), urban and natural settings, to the planet - are explored. Issues of public health, environmental justice, universal design, and culture are included throughout. Lecture and discussion class with hands-on assignments and quizzes. Upper level undergraduate and graduate students from across the University and especially in architecture, the sustainability minor, design, pre-professional studies, social sciences, and business are encouraged to enroll.

 

CENTERS AND INSTITUTES

 

 

CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS

CSC 23855 / ESS 23250 / ESS 33362 / PSY 23855 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten
Jay Brandenberger, Ellen Kyes
Credit Hours: 1
Take Ten is a research-based conflict resolution curriculum designed at the University of Notre Dame and headquartered at the University's Robinson Community Learning Center. Take Ten's mission is to provide youth with positive alternatives to violence and build their capacity to make more informed choices when faced with conflict. Take Ten volunteers work on a weekly basis with schoolchildren of all grades to teach them the skills needed to resolve conflict peacefully. Born as a restorative practice within the scope of a restorative justice lens, Take Ten has recently developed a method of teaching its curriculum in the Peacemaking Circles format as well as offering Talking Circles at some schools.Students participating in the Take Ten seminar will serve as Take Ten volunteers during the semester (February through May with training in January), being part of a team that works at a school in the area one time per week. The seminar itself will meet in the Peacemaking Circles format and will function as training for seminar students to become Circle facilitators. Readings and reflections will allow students to focus on understanding issues of youth and violence from various perspectives and to discuss their work in Circle.
 
CSC 33001 (CBL/CBR)
Social Change Fellows
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen, Jay Brandenberger
Credit Hours: 2
Section B is the second section of the LSC Fellows. Working together as a learning community, these students will consider foundations to leadership in the 21st century, the dynamics of the most pressing problems our world has ever considered, and the role of vocation, discernment, catholic social teaching, and innovative leadership for social change necessary to tackle these issues upon graduation from Notre Dame. Section B will focus on work in the fractured world and the skill sets and tools needed for action and change.The fellows program seeks to support students who desire to intersect their vocational goals with work for the common good. The course, offered in two sections, seeks to engage students in a rich interdisciplinary learning space to consider the multi-dimensional realities of 21st century social concerns and the skills and vocational needs necessary to bring about creative solutions and problem solving. The course is only one element to the co-curricular and curricular programing that is offered to the fellows.Students will participate in a 3-day immersion in the Spring to support community-based learning and key themes of leadership development, skill building, vocational discernment, and CST as a foundation for changemaking will be addressed both sections of the course.
 
CSC 33300 / AMST 30813 / GH 63300 / IIPS 33203 (CBL, CBR)
Home and Dome
Wood, Danielle Sisk, Matthew
Credit Hours: 1
This introductory seminar will provide an overview of Community-Based Research (CBR) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as part of a data collection project with a handheld device. CBR supports democratic processes, as it engages academic researchers and community partners together in addressing community challenges. Our project will be geotagging and creating a data layer in a South Bend neighborhood. The focus will be on vacant land and property condition for the purpose of facilitating our community partners in identifying, prioritizing, planning, and measuring the impact of their improvement projects. Students will participate in shared learning with faculty, students, and community partners about South Bend, community development, GIS, and the CBR process through readings, discussions, and the hands-on data collection.
 
CSC 33458 / SOC 33458 / CST 33458 / ILS 33701 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Mexico-U.S. Border Immersion Seminar
Kraig Beyerlein
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar and experiential-learning course is broken into two parts. In the fall (for two credits), students will participate in a seminar that will expose them to various perspectives about immigration issues, especially those related to the México-U.S. border. During our in-class meetings in the fall, (approximately 1 hr. & 40 min. per week), we will discuss scholarly and journalistic accounts of why migrants leave their home countries, the struggles they face during the journey, how U.S. citizens are responding, and possible policy solutions. In the spring (for one credit), students will participate in an immersion trip to the Southern Arizona borderlands during the first week of January and in follow-up classroom meetings (approximately 50 min. per week) during the spring semester to process the immersion experience. During the immersion trip, we will observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, be trained for and participate in humanitarian efforts, tour a Border Patrol and detention facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from faith leaders about their current and past border activism, and visit Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community. Throughout the course, particular focus will be given to the intersection of religion - especially Catholic Social Teachings - and border and immigration issues. To be eligible, students must complete an application, linked here:https://www3.nd.edu/~csc/application/sem_application.php?s=Fall&y=2017. Enrollment is competitive. The 15 available spots will be chosen based on the application responses, with preference given to those submitting earliest. Students will be notified about their status within a week of submitting the application. There are fees associated with this seminar (also see CSC website for information). This is a graded course. Department approval is required. [Note: Due to the overlap in content, students who have completed the one-credit version (CSC 33966/SOC 33066/ILS 30804/THEO 33966) cannot take this course.]
 
CSC 33900 / IIPS 33202 (CBR)
Advocacy for the Common Good
Michael Hebbeler
Credit Hours: 1
This one credit course aims to develop a shared understanding of advocacy and the common good, and to cultivate skills to help strengthen students' advocacy planning and action in pursuit of social justice. This course is co-facilitated by seasoned advocates and organizers from Catholic Relief Services. The opening weekend workshop (January 20-21) will introduce students to advocacy tools and skills, including mapping power, navigating the legislative process, mobilizing, developing effective messaging and influencing decision makers. Students will then form groups and spend twelve weeks to research, develop and implement advocacy campaigns on a particular issue. There will be four check-in class sessions and a final class session in which each group will share its campaign phases - research, media use, public meeting - and address challenges as well as celebrate successes. Non Traditional Meeting Days/Dates/Times: Opening Training: Fri, Jan 20th, 5:00pm-9:00pm & Sat, Jan 21st, 9:00am-4:15pm; Check-ins: Mondays 1/30, 2/13, 3/5, 3/27, and 4/10 from 5:00 to 6:30 pm.
 
CSC 33902 / STV 33902 / SC 33902 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminars: Science Policy Ethics
Kyle Lantz, Clarence Carter
Credit Hours: 1
Offered jointly with the College of Science, this Social Concerns Seminar will examine ethical responsibilities within science funding allocations and the regulation of basic and translational research. In the framework of Catholic Social Teaching, students will explore science policy development, government funding for science, and the regulation of both basic science and translational research, including special concerns for neglected disease and global health research. The course aims to explore how and why the government invests in research, how those funds are distributed to scientists, and ultimately how new discoveries are translated to new technologies, ultimately for the good of the general public. Working with Notre Dame's Federal Relations Team in Washington, D.C. over spring break, students will meet with scientists, multiple federal agencies, and policy makers. In preparation for meetings in Washington, 5 panel sessions will feature speakers with experience in research ethics and integrity, advocating for funding for science, distributing those funds, or working at the intersections of government policy, basic science, physics and engineering technology, environmental science, and clinical and translational research. This course poses a unique opportunity for students to network with various federal funding agencies and policymakers in Washington, D.C. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.
 
CSC 33933 / THEO 33933 / CST 33933 (CBL/EL)
Summer Service Learning: Cross-Cultural Learning Program (CCLP)
Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 3
This is a leadership internship for Cross-cultural/Urban studies working 8 weeks in a multicultural area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will work with ILS to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved. Students will complete academic requirements including readings, reflection sessions, and a presentation of a synthesis paper at the end of the internship. Application and interview necessary for participation.
 
CSC 33936 / THEO 33936 / CST 33936 (CBL/EL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins
Benjamin Wilson
Credit Hours: 3
Immersion: Eight-week summer service-learning placements This three-credit course of the Summer Service Learning Program takes place before, during, and after student participation in the eight consecutive week summer immersion sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Notre Dame Alumni Association. The goal of the course is to reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through experiential learning, reading, writing and discussions. Writing assignments include journal assignments and a final paper. The course is completed during the first five weeks of fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. Acceptance is based on the student's application and interview. Contact the Center for Social Concerns for more information.
 
CSC 33938 / THEO 33938 / CST 33938 (CBL/EL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues International
Rachel Tomas Morgan
Credit Hours: 3
This course and internship is synonymous with the Center for Social Concerns International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP). The course seeks to challenge students who have domestic service-learning experiences to encounter international realities, and to provide them the opportunity to work with persons and grass roots groups working to address the needs of the poor internationally. The learning goals of the course are to gain an understanding of the multi- dimensionality of poverty in the developing world; analyze root causes, and identify strategies for social development (poverty alleviation); to gain an understanding of international social issues in light of Catholic social teaching; and to strengthen cross-cultural competencies. Academic requirements include a journal, reading and writing assignments during the summer months, a mandatory day retreat in the fall following the summer placement, attendance at the four re-entry classes in August and September, debriefing and a final paper/project.
 
CSC 33950 / CSC 63950 / THEO 33950 / CST 33950 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.
 
CSC 33951 / THEO 33951 / CST 33951 (EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: U.S. Healthcare
Kyle Lantz
Credit Hours: 1
U.S. health care policy and reform has increasingly been at the center of public debate and discussion in recent years. Furthermore, the Catholic social tradition invites persons of good will to pursue a health care system that raises the dignity of each person. This seminar invites participants to examine and assess our current and evolving healthcare system, explore the possibilities and direction of the future of U.S. healthcare, and investigate how modifications might move us toward a society that reflects care for the common good. As a point of comparison, this seminar will also evaluate international health care systems and challenges. In preparation, students will look at the complexities of integrating economics, policy, and health-related outcomes into a system that works toward the common good and especially toward those in poverty. Students will travel to Washington, D.C., during Spring Break to spend time with policy makers, health care advocacy groups, medical professionals, and researchers.
 
CSC 33952 / THEO 33952 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Social Change
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen, Connie Mick
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar allows students to participate in an experiential opportunity designed to examine contemporary social problems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.
 
CSC 33963 / THEO 33963 / CST 33963 (CBL/EL)
Social Concern Seminar: Church Social Action
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen, Kyle Lantz
Credit Hours: 1
This course centers around a 48-hour immersion (colloquially known as the Urban Plunge) in an urban setting during the winter break (prior to return to campus). The course includes a preparation workshop in the fall semester, readings, two reflection papers, and follow-up educational meetings.
 
CSC 33967 / THEO 33967 / CST 33967 / ILS 33967 (CBL/EL)
Social Concern Seminar: Migrant Experience
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar offers a unique immersion into the lives of migrant farm workers in Florida during the spring harvest.
 
CSC 33968 / THEO 33968 / PSY 23852 / CST 33968 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: L'Arche Community
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen
Credit Hours: 1
The L'Arche Seminar introduces students to the philosophy of Jean Vanier and to the model of service that his writings inspired. The class sessions leading up to the immersion will cover topics such as: Catholic Social Tradition and a framework for Solidarity; Spirituality lived in Community; Policy, Advocacy, and Discrimination; Vanier on Becoming Human. This is an invitation to think deeply about and observe directly a community (of people with and without disabilities) living together in the spirit of the beatitudes. Students will also witness how living in a L'Arche community has influenced the lives of the core members, assistants, and others. Students will likely have some opportunity to communicate with other organizations about their advocacy and policy work that relates to people with disabilities.
 
CSC 33970 / THEO 33970 / CST 33970 / CSC 63970 (CBL/EL)
Global Issues
Rachel Tomas Morgan
Credit Hours: 1
This course serves as the required orientation course for all THEO 33938: International Summer Service Learning Program participants. It will provide students with an introduction to international issues in developing countries through the lens of Catholic social tradition, guidance in independent country/area study, preparation and tools for cross-cultural service, opportunities for theological reflection, logistical information necessary for international programs and travel, and general support within the context of a community of colleagues. Students must attend the mandatory Cross-Cultural Orientation Retreat held on February 9-10, 2018. Other students doing summer internships in developing countries may take the course with permission from the instructor.
 
CSC 33972 / HESB 33101 / IIPS 50703 / IIPS 63205 / ESS 33363 (CBL/EL)
Restorative Justice
Susan Sharpe
Credit Hours: 3
Restorative justice is gaining visibility in contemporary social justice efforts. Advocates of change, ranging from parents to police, from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops to the cofounders of Black Lives Matter, are claiming restorative justice as an important way forward in making our institutions more just and more effective. This course will give students an understanding of how and why that potential exists, and teach them the basics of a primary restorative justice practice. Students will learn the fundamentals of Circle dialogue, situating it in the context of relevant theoretic frameworks and in the context of key restorative justice applications (including criminal justice, education, and systemic injustice). Students will be encouraged to search for potential applications of restorative justice theory and practice in the professional fields they anticipate entering. This will be a community-based learning course, requiring each student to perform 20 hours of work in the local community at pre-arranged sites as part of the course, in addition to regular reading and writing assignments.
 
CSC 33973 CBL/EL
Social Concerns Seminar: Realities of Race
Kyle Lantz, Melissa Marley Bonnichsen
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar will take a close look at the realities of race in the United States in the 21st century. How can Catholic Social Teaching inform our conversation and response to the realities? The classes before immersion will seek honest dialogue about the complexities of race with regard to history, current events, racism, and privilege. Participants will travel together over spring break to urban centers to further the conversation and learning in St. Louis and Chicago. Upon return, we will consider the local racial realities in South Bend and Notre Dame communities.
 
CSC 33974 / SOC 33074 
Prison Writing
Sheila McCarthy, Michael Hebbeler
Credit Hours: 3
What does it mean for an individual and a society to be free, and what does this freedom require? We will explore these fundamental questions of human existence through literature that portrays imprisonment and liberation. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Works include fiction and nonfiction, and the chains we encounter will be both figurative and literal. Of special focus will be the relationship between the individual and society, as students will reflect on their personal narratives within their respective communities and the broader social structures that bind us all. We will identify chains that hinder our freedom and chains that link us together as we seek to liberate ourselves and our communities.
 
CSC 33998 / PSY 23096 (CB/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Understanding Mental Illness
Lisa Anderson, Jay Brandenberger
Credit Hours: 1
In the United States alone, over 60 million people are affected with a mental illness in a given year. Fourteen million of those suffer with chronic, serious mental illness. Countless family members, friends and mental health professionals struggle to understand and help those diagnosed with these confusing and often debilitating diseases. Unless we know someone or struggle with similar issues ourselves, the majority of the rest of us know virtually nothing about the confusing "world" of mental illness. This seminar gives students the opportunity to learn about mental illness from the personal perspective of those most directly impacted by it: those living with it, family members, and health care providers. The goals of this seminar are to help students become more knowledgeable about these diseases and develop understanding and compassion for those who suffer from them.
 
CSC 36991 (sec. 1-3) (CBL/CBR/EL)
Directed Readings
Connie Mick, Jay Brandenberger, Danielle Wood
Credit Hours: Variable
Research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.
 
CSC 60698 / (THEO 60698 /CBL/EL)
Common Good Initiative  Germany/Austria
Clemens Sedmark
Credit Hours: 2
The course will offer a well prepared immersion in Southern Germany and Austria exploring holocaust memorial sites and encountering communities of memory. It will employ of a multi-disciplinary approach, making use of insights and approaches from theology, philosophy, history, education, architecture, social geography, political science, sociology. The course intends to offer bridges to a discussion of the common good and its connections to an ethics of remembering. The course is offered to graduate students from different disciplines.
 
CSC 63001 /CSLC 63001  (CBL/EL)
Transformation Through Teaching
Brian O’Conchubhair
Credit Hours: 1
This course is for Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistants (FLTAs) associated with the Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures (CSLC) who have been assigned to teach their native language and culture at Perley Fine Arts Academy. This course builds upon the Fall course, Globalizing Perley.
 
CSC 63950 / CSC 33950 / THEO 33950 / CST 33950 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia
Melissa Marley Bonnichsen
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.
 
CSC 63953 (EL)
Civic Engagement & Social Responsibility
Connie Mick, Melissa Marley Bonnichsen
Credit Hours: Variable
This seminar allows graduate students to participate in an experiential learning opportunity designed to concentrate on civic engagement and social responsibility. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.
 
CSC 63970 /CST 33970 /THEO 33970/  CSC 63970 (CBL/EL)
Global Issues - Graduate
Rachel Tomas Morgan
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar allows graduate students to participate in an experiential learning opportunity designed to concentrate on civic engagement and social responsibility. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.
 
CSC 66693
Directed Readings - Common Good Initiative
Instructor TBA
Credit Hours: Variable
Research and writing under the direction of the director for the Common Good Initiative.
 
 
 

CENTER FOR STUDY OF LANGUAGE AND CULTURES

CSLC 63001 / CSC 63001 / (CBL/EL)
T​ransformation Through Teaching
O'Conchubhair, Brian
Credit Hours: 1
This course is for Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistants (FLTAs) associated with the Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures (CSLC) who have been assigned to teach their native language and culture at Perley Fine Arts Academy. This course builds upon the Fall course, Globalizing Perley.

 

 

 

INSTITUTE OF LATINO STUDIES

ILS 20912 sec. 1-2 / ROSP 20810 sec. 1-2 / (CBL)
CBL: Language, Culture and Community
Topash-Rios, Andrea
Credit Hours: 3
This fifth-semester language and culture course is designed for students who want to improve their communication skills in Spanish and broaden their understanding of the Hispanic world through connecting with the local Spanish speaking community. Each section may focus on different topics, such as healthcare, education, social services, history of immigration, and intercultural competence. The course has a required Community-Based-Learning component in which students engage with the Latino community through placements in such areas as health care, youth mentoring or tutoring programs, English as a New Language (ENL) classes, and facilitating educational workshops with parents. In this course, students integrate their service experiences with the academic components of the class through readings, research, reflective writing, and discussion.
 
ILS 33701 / CSC 33458 / CST 33458 / SOC 33458 / (CBL/EL)  
Social Concerns Seminar: Border Immersion
Beyerlein, Kraig
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar and experiential-learning course is broken into two parts. In the fall (for two credits), students will participate in a seminar that will expose them to various perspectives about immigration issues, especially those related to the México-U.S. border. During our in-class meetings in the fall, (approximately 1 hr. & 40 min. per week), we will discuss scholarly and journalistic accounts of why migrants leave their home countries, the struggles they face during the journey, how U.S. citizens are responding, and possible policy solutions. In the spring (for one credit), students will participate in an immersion trip to the Southern Arizona borderlands during the first week of January and in follow-up classroom meetings (approximately 50 min. per week) during the spring semester to process the immersion experience. During the immersion trip, we will observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, be trained for and participate in humanitarian efforts, tour a Border Patrol and detention facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from faith leaders about their current and past border activism, and visit Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community. Throughout the course, particular focus will be given to the intersection of religion - especially Catholic Social Teachings?and border and immigration issues. To be eligible, students must complete an application, linked here: https://www3.nd.edu/~csc/application/sem_application.php?s=Fall&y=2016. Enrollment is competitive. The 15 available spots will be chosen based on the application responses, with preference given to those submitting earliest. Students will be notified about their status within a week of submitting the application. There are fees associated with this seminar (also see CSC website for information). This is a graded course. Department approval is required. [Note: Due to the overlap in content, students who have completed the one-credit version (CSC 33966/SOC 33066/ILS 30804/THEO 33966) cannot take this course.]
 
ILS 33967 / CSC 33967 / CST 33967 / THEO 33967 / (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experience
Marley Bonnichsen, Melissa
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar offers a unique immersion into the lives of migrant farm workers in Florida during the spring harvest.

 

 

ECK INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL HEALTH

GH 63300/ AMST 30813 / CSC 33300 / IIPS 33203 (CBL, CBR)
Home and Dome
Wood, Danielle Sisk, Matthew
Credit Hours: 1
This introductory seminar will provide an overview of Community-Based Research (CBR) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as part of a data collection project with a handheld device. CBR supports democratic processes, as it engages academic researchers and community partners together in addressing community challenges. Our project will be geotagging and creating a data layer in a South Bend neighborhood. The focus will be on vacant land and property condition for the purpose of facilitating our community partners in identifying, prioritizing, planning, and measuring the impact of their improvement projects. Students will participate in shared learning with faculty, students, and community partners about South Bend, community development, GIS, and the CBR process through readings, discussions, and the hands-on data collection.
 
GH 68551  (CBL/CBR)
Capstone Research
Michelle Ngai
Credit Hours: 2
The Capstone Research class that will continue to support the logistics of the Capstone Project and prepare for the field research. Students are expected to work on their research primarily with their Capstone Supervisor and Committee and the class will meet periodically throughout the semester. The class will continue to explore topics of culture humility and awareness in preparation for field placements. Students will submit a budget for carrying out their research, obtain IRB approval, and complete other travel safety and health requirements.
 
GH 60612 (CBR)
Advanced Qualitative Methods
Naomi Penney
Credit Hours: V
Advanced Qualitative Methods is focused on students' Capstone research. The course builds upon the materials in the Fall semester to deepen understanding of qualitative data collection and analysis. In addition, this course offers an opportunity for students to practice fieldwork by working with a South Bend community organization and community members. Working as a team students will partner with community members to conduct a neighborhood assessment and conduct and analyze focus groups.

 

 

KROC INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACE STUDIES

IIPS 20729 / THEO 20643 /  CST 20643 (CBL)
The Askesis of Nonviolence
Pfeil, Margaret
Credit Hours: 3
This course will explore the theology and practice of nonviolence as a form of askesis, or spiritual discipline. The material will include readings from Scripture, the early Christian tradition, and Catholic social teaching. Religious sources outside the Christian tradition will include Gandhi, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Badshah Khan. This course will use the method of community-based learning and will require 20 hours of service at particular sites in the South Bend area.
 
IIPS 30927/ ANTH 33314/ ANTH 63314 / IDS 33100 / ASIA 30305 /  LAST 30004 (EL)
Immigration Global Perspective
Albahari, Maurizio
Credit Hours: 3
How do people in immigrant-receiving countries shape their attitudes toward immigrants? What are the differences between refugees and other migrants? How is immigration related to urban "immigrant riots?" And what can anthropological studies of borders and national policies tell us about the transnational world in which we live? We will examine these and related questions, and more generally the causes, lived experiences, and consequences of migration. We will acquire a sound understanding of migration in its social, political, legal, and cultural facets. Fieldwork accounts from countries of origin and from the U.S., Europe, Australia, and Japan will enable us to appreciate both global and U.S. distinctive trends. Rather than merely learning a collection of facts about immigrants, we will address how migration intersects with gender and class, the mass media, border enforcement, racism, the economy, territory and identity formation, and religion.
 
IIPS 33202 / CSC 33900 / AMST  30813 / GH 63300 (CBL/CBR)
Advocacy for the Common Good
Hebbeler, Michael
Credit Hours: 1
This one credit course aims to develop a shared understanding of advocacy and the common good, and to cultivate skills to help strengthen students' advocacy planning and action in pursuit of social justice. This course is co-facilitated by seasoned advocates and organizers from Catholic Relief Services. The opening weekend workshop (January 20-21) will introduce students to advocacy tools and skills, including mapping power, navigating the legislative process, mobilizing, developing effective messaging and influencing decision makers. Students will then form groups and spend twelve weeks to research, develop and implement advocacy campaigns on a particular issue. There will be four check-in class sessions and a final class session in which each group will share its campaign phases - research, media use, public meeting - and address challenges as well as celebrate successes. Non Traditional Meeting Days/Dates/Times: Opening Training: Fri, Jan 20th, 5:00pm-9:00pm & Sat, Jan 21st, 9:00am-4:15pm; Check-ins: Mondays 1/30, 2/13, 3/5, 3/27, and 4/10 from 5:00 to 6:30pm.
 
IIPS 33203 / AMST 30813 / CSC 33300 / GH 63300 (CBL/CBR)
Home and Dome
Wood, Danielle Sisk, Matthew
Credit Hours: 1
This introductory seminar will provide an overview of Community-Based Research (CBR) and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as part of a data collection project with a handheld device. CBR supports democratic processes, as it engages academic researchers and community partners together in addressing community challenges. Our project will be geotagging and creating a data layer in a South Bend neighborhood. The focus will be on vacant land and property condition for the purpose of facilitating our community partners in identifying, prioritizing, planning, and measuring the impact of their improvement projects. Students will participate in shared learning with faculty, students, and community partners about South Bend, community development, GIS, and the CBR process through readings, discussions, and the hands-on data collection.
 
IIPS 33702 /CST 33301 / ESS 30214 / SOC 33001 / (CBL/EL)
Sociology, Self, Catholic Social Tradition
Weigert, Andrew
Credit Hours: 3
What's Catholic about sociology? What's sociological about Catholic Social Tradition? What does all this mean for sociology majors, what they study, and how this may affect their careers and lives after graduation? This course is a critical examination of the links between Catholic social thought and sociology as a discipline. We will engage these ideas through an experimental, team-taught seminar format. Readings will include core statements of Catholic social tradition, critiques thereof, and autobiographical essays written by sociologists and others who are dedicated to social justice.
 
IIPS 40921/ AMST 30761 / CNST 40404 / ESS 40610 / GS 40522 / GSC 60522/ HESB 40104 / HIST 30861 /  AFST 40711 (CBR)
Prisons and Policing in the U.S.
Pam Butler
Credit Hours: 3
Scholars and activists use the concept of the ?carceral state? to describe the official, government use of policing, surveillance, and mass imprisonment to exercise control over society. This course examines the histories, cultures, politics, and economics of prisons and policing in the United States, in order to determine how the U.S. carceral state has been a factor in the social construction of race, gender, and citizenship.We will study the genealogy of the U.S. carceral state -- beginning with the surveillance embedded in the earliest practices of slavery and settler colonialism, tracing its development through the 19th and early 20th centuries, and concluding with the rise of the modern prison industrial complex. We will then focus on contemporary U.S. prisons, policing, and surveillance, using case studies including the ?war on drugs,? immigrant detention, sex-crime regulation, and police violence. Finally, we will consider alternatives to prisons and policing, as we learn about academic research and activist movements working to end state and police violence, abolish prisons, and create opportunities for restorative justice.Over the course of the semester, students will learn about the historical development and ongoing maintenance of the carceral state, using an intersectional framework that highlights the ways in which prisons and policing have both shaped, and been shaped by, race, gender, citizenship, and economics. Along the way, students will ask and address such questions as: How does the U.S. carceral state function as a tool for social control? What histories, policies, and ideologies underlie the carceral state? How have individuals and organizations worked to transform or abolish the carceral state? How have art and cultural production been used to normalize and/or critique the carceral state? And can we imagine a world without prisons or police?
 
IIPS 50703 /IIPS 63205 / IIPS 50703/ CSC 33972 / ESS 33363 / HESB 33101 
Restorative Justice
Susan Sharpe
Credit Hours: 3
Restorative justice is gaining visibility in contemporary social justice efforts. Advocates of change, ranging from parents to police, from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops to the co-founders of Black Lives Matter, are claiming restorative justice as an important way forward in making our institutions more just and more effective. This course will give students an understanding of how and why that potential exists, and teach them the basics of a primary restorative justice practice. Students will learn the fundamentals of Circle dialogue, situating it in the context of relevant theoretical frameworks and in the context of key restorative justice applications (including criminal justice, education, and systemic injustice). Students will be encouraged to search for potential applications of restorative justice theory and practice in the professional fields they anticipate entering. This will be a community-based learning course, requiring each student to perform 20 hours of work in the local community at pre-arranged sites as part of the course, in addition to regular reading and writing assignments.
 
IIPS 50705 / IIPS 70211 / GSC 60555 / GSC 40567 IIPS 70211 / THEO 40810 / THEO 60923  (Optional CBL)
Feminist and Multicultural Theologies
Hilkert, M. Catherine
Credit Hours: 3
An exploration of how the voices of women have helped to reshape theological discourse and to bring to light new dimensions of the living Christian tradition. Using writings of feminist, womanist, Latina, mujerista, Asian, and "Third World" theologians, the course will focus on the significance of gender and social location in understanding the nature and sources of theology, theological anthropology, Christology/soteriology, the mystery of God, and women's spirituality.
 
IIPS 60800 / ANTH 60800 / MGA 60702 (CBR)
Ethnographic Methods for Peace Research
Bolten, Catherine
Credit Hours: 3
In this course, students will learn to use methods, insights, and techniques of ethnographic fieldwork in order to conduct research in conflict and post-conflict settings. We will investigate topics such as researcher identity and access in the field, research design, bias and ethical considerations, interview techniques, participant observation, writing fieldnotes, coding and analysis, and writing. This class is designed to prepare students for a field experience, therefore the course requires students to formulate and carry out a project in the local setting as the primary focus of learning.
 
IIPS 63205 / IIPS 50703/ CSC 33972 / ESS 33363 / HESB 33101 
Restorative Justice
Susan Sharpe
Credit Hours: 3
Restorative justice is gaining visibility in contemporary social justice efforts. Advocates of change, ranging from parents to police, from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops to the co-founders of Black Lives Matter, are claiming restorative justice as an important way forward in making our institutions more just and more effective. This course will give students an understanding of how and why that potential exists, and teach them the basics of a primary restorative justice practice. Students will learn the fundamentals of Circle dialogue, situating it in the context of relevant theoretical frameworks and in the context of key restorative justice applications (including criminal justice, education, and systemic injustice). Students will be encouraged to search for potential applications of restorative justice theory and practice in the professional fields they anticipate entering. This will be a community-based learning course, requiring each student to perform 20 hours of work in the local community at pre-arranged sites as part of the course, in addition to regular reading and writing assignments.
 
IIPS 70211 / IIPS 50705 / GSC 40567 / GSC 60555 / THEO 40810 / THEO 60823 (Optional CBL)
Feminist and Multicultural Theologies
Hilkert, M. Catherine
Credit Hour: 3
An exploration of how the voices of women have helped to reshape theological discourse and to bring to light new dimensions of the living Christian tradition. Using writings of feminist, womanist, Latina, mujerista, Asian, and "Third World" theologians, the course will focus on the significance of gender and social location in understanding the nature and sources of theology, theological anthropology, Christology/soteriology, the mystery of God, and women's spirituality.

 

 

LIU INSTITUTE FOR ASIA AND ASIAN STUDIES

ASIA 30305 / ANTH 33314 (sec. 1-2 ) / ANTH 63314/  IDS 33100/ IIPS 30927 / LAST 30004 (EL)
Immigration Global Perspective
Albahari, Maurizio
Credit Hours: 3
How do people in immigrant-receiving countries shape their attitudes toward immigrants? What are the differences between refugees and other migrants? How is immigration related to urban "immigrant riots?" And what can anthropological studies of borders and national policies tell us about the transnational world in which we live? We will examine these and related questions, and more generally the causes, lived experiences, and consequences of migration. We will acquire a sound understanding of migration in its social, political, legal, and cultural facets. Fieldwork accounts from countries of origin and from the U.S., Europe, Australia, and Japan will enable us to appreciate both global and U.S. distinctive trends. Rather than merely learning a collection of facts about immigrants, we will address how migration intersects with gender and class, the mass media, border enforcement, racism, the economy, territory and identity formation, and religion.

 

GRADUATE SCHOOL

 

DOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTS

DMA 83104 / ANTH 43318 / ANTH 63318 / MSM 63108 / THEO 60408 (EL)
Ritual Studies
Peter Jeffery
Credits: 3
Ritual is the most powerful medium of communication, since it can make use of language, performance, symbolism, architecture?anything humans can do. Ritual can be found everywhere?in religion, politics, marketing, entertainment. In this hands-on course we will learn how to research the ways people use or avoid ritual: how and why they embrace or reject liturgical reforms, invent new rites or revive old ones, cross or respect picket lines, wear funny hats at sports events, fight over the planning of the high school prom, or go out for a smoke during the sermon?and how ritual shapes culture and is shaped by culture. Learning by doing, we will be initiated into the academic study of symbolism, narrative, myth, memory, community, and culture, using social science techniques that include participant observation, semi-structured interviewing, focus groups, writing and coding field notes, film criticism, and more.

 

 

 

MASTERS IN GLOBAL AFFAIRS

MGA 60702 / IIPS 60800 / ANTH 60800 (CBR)
Ethnographic Methods for Peace Research
Catherine Bolten
Credits: 3
In this course, students will learn to use methods, insights, and techniques of ethnographic fieldwork in order to conduct research in conflict and post-conflict settings. We will investigate topics such as researcher identity and access in the field, research design, bias and ethical considerations, interview techniques, participant observation, writing fieldnotes, coding and analysis, and writing. This class is designed to prepare students for a field experience, therefore the course requires students to formulate and carry out a project in the local setting as the primary focus of learning.
 

 

MASTERS IN SACRED MUSIC

MSM 63103 / ANTH 43318 / ANTH 63318 / DMA 83104/ THEO 60408/ THEO 33963 (EL)
Ritual Studies
Peter Jeffery
Credits: 3
Ritual is the most powerful medium of communication, since it can make use of language, performance, symbolism, architecture?anything humans can do. Ritual can be found everywhere?in religion, politics, marketing, entertainment. In this hands-on course we will learn how to research the ways people use or avoid ritual: how and why they embrace or reject liturgical reforms, invent new rites or revive old ones, cross or respect picket lines, wear funny hats at sports events, fight over the planning of the high school prom, or go out for a smoke during the sermon?and how ritual shapes culture and is shaped by culture. Learning by doing, we will be initiated into the academic study of symbolism, narrative, myth, memory, community, and culture, using social science techniques that include participant observation, semi-structured interviewing, focus groups, writing and coding field notes, film criticism, and more.

 

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Upcoming Events

January 2019

15
16
Information Session: Spring 2019 Social Concerns Seminars
Wednesday, January 16, 2019 - 4:00pm
17
Information Session: SSLP
Thursday, January 17, 2019 - 5:00pm to 5:30pm
23
2019 Social Concerns Fair
Wednesday, January 23, 2019 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm

March 2019

21
Pre-Conference Workshop: Restorative Justice on Catholic Campuses
Thursday, March 21, 2019 - 12:30pm to 4:00pm
21
2019 Catholic Social Tradition Conference
Thursday, March 21, 2019 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
22
2019 Catholic Social Tradition Conference
Friday, March 22, 2019 - 7:30am to 9:30pm
23
2019 Catholic Social Tradition Conference
Saturday, March 23, 2019 - 8:00am to 4:30pm

April 2019

05
Been & Seen Series
Friday, April 5, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

June 2019

04
Community Engagement Faculty Institute
Tuesday, June 4, 2019 (All day) to Thursday, June 6, 2019 (All day)