Fall 2019 Community-Engaged Courses

COMMUNITY-ENGAGED COURSES 

The Center for Social Concerns offers the following kinds of community-based courses:

Experiential Learning (EL) — students learning outside the classroom through site visits with community experts

Community-Based Learning (CBL) — students engaging in sustained partnership with community agencies through service or educational activities relevant to coursework

Community-Based Research (CBR) — students either conducting research or elements of the research process in collaboration with community partners and for their benefit. We list courses that have isolated events as well as those that require significant ongoing engagement

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FALL 2019 COMMUNITY-ENGAGED COURSES

Click on department name to view departmental course listings and descriptions.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS

AFRICANA STUDIES

AFST 20703 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Introduction to Social Problems
AFST 43575 (CBL) Race & Ethnicity in U.S.

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 30137 (sec.1 & sec. 2) (CBL) The Indian School and American Culture: Native peoples, education, mascots, and more
AMST 30145 (sec. 1 & sec. 2) (CBL) Immigrant America
AMST 30812 (CBL) Rethinking Crime and Justice: Explorations from the Inside Out
AMST 40402 (CBR / CBL) Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study
AMST 41402 (CBL) Service Mexican Immigration

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 30115 (CBL) Immigrant America
ANTH 30117 (CBL) The Indian School and American Culture: Native peoples, education, mascots, and more
ANTH 40200 (CBL) Visualizing Global Change
ANTH 41103 (CBL) Service Mexican Immigration
ANTH 43305 (CBL) Mexican Immigration

ART, ART HISTORY, AND DESIGN

DESN 20203 (CBL) DESN Matters: Intro, DESN Think
DESN 30111 (CBL) VCD5: Scale Graphics, Narrative
DESN 40201 (CBR) ID: Collaborative Design Development

COLLEGE SEMINAR

CSEM 23101 CBL (sec. 3 & 4) Common Good: Defining Community
CSEM 23101 CBL (sec 39 & 40) Great Power Politics

ENGLISH

ENGL 20023 (CBR) Writing Center, Theory & Practice

FILM, TELEVISION, AND THEATRE

FTT 30603 (CBL) Visualizing Global Change

FIRST YEAR OF STUDIES

FYS 13992 (CBL/EL) Ethical Leadership

GENDER STUDIES

GSC 35000 (CBL) Internship
GSC 41103 (CBL) Service Mexican Immigration
GSC 43103 (CBR/CBL) Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study

GSC 43527 (CBL/EL) Morality, Parenting, and Nature Connection in the Anthropocene

HESBURGH PROGRAM IN PUBLIC SERVICE

HESB 20220 (CBL) Intro to Social Problems
HESB 30302 (CBL) Explorations from the Inside Out: Rethinking Crime & Justice
HESB 30303 (CBL) Social Entrepreneurship
HESB 30348 (CBL/EL) Philanthropy: Society & the Common Good (Hesburgh Public Service)
HESB 40108 (CBL/CBR) Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study
HESB 40110 (CBL) Service Mexican Immigration

HISTORY

HIST 30765 (CBL) The Indian School and American Culture: Native peoples, education, mascots, and more

MUSIC

MUS 20691 (EL) Wind and Percussion Pedagogy

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 30142 (CBL/EL) Philanthropy: Society & the Common Good (Hesburgh Public Service)
POLS 35901 (CBL/CBR) Internship

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 23271 (CBR/EL) Autism Spectrum Disorder Practicum I
PSY 33643 (CBL) Literacy Development and Children
PSY 33685 (CBL) Social Factors & Sustainability: Effects of the Built Environment on Health & Well-Being
PSY 33691 (CBL) Rethinking Crime and Justice: Explorations from the Inside Out
PSY 43242 (CBL/EL) Morality, Parenting and Nature Connection in the Anthropocene
PSY 43271 (CBR/EL) Autism Spectrum Disorder Practicum I-W
PSY 43288 (CBR) Practicum: Child Maltreatment
PSY 60685 (CBL) Social Factors & Sustainability
PSY 61383 (CBL) Adult Assessment Practicum I
PSY 61385 (CBL) Practicum I
PSY 61387 (CBL) Practicum III
PSY 61389 (CBL) Practicum V
PSY 61391 (CBL) Practicum VII
PSY 61394 (CBL) Marital Therapy Practicum

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

ROSP 20201 (sec. 1-11) (CBL/EL) Intermediate Spanish I
ROSP 20202 (sec. 1-5) (CBL/EL) Intermediate Spanish II
ROSP 20810 (CBL) Community-Based Spanish: Language, Culture, and Community
ROSP 30051 (CBL) Once Upon a Time
ROSP 30320 (sec. 1 & sec. 2) (CBL/EL) Advanced Grammar and Writing

ROSP 40876 (CBL) Race & Ethnicity in U.S.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

LLRO 20690 (CBL) The World in Rome
LLRO 30883 (CBR/CBL) Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study
LLRO 31883 (CBL) Service Mexican Immigration

RUSSIAN
RU 40101 (CBL) Advanced Russian I

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 10033 (CBL) Introduction to Social Problems
SOC 20033 (CBL) Introduction to Social Problems
SOC 30145 (CBL) Immigrant America
SOC 33458 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Mexico-U.S. Border Immersion
SOC 40200 (CBL)  Visualizing Global Change
SOC 43516 (CBL) Cultural Politics of Religion and Women's Human Rights
SOC 45000 (CBL) Sociology Internships

THEOLOGY

THEO 20625 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice
THEO 30350 (CBL) Sustainability at Notre Dame
THEO 33858 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: International Issues
THEO 33933 (CBL) CCLP (Chicago)*
THEO 33936 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins
THEO 33938 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues International
THEO 33950 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia
THEO 33952 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Topics in Social Change
THEO 33961 (EL) Discernment
THEO 33962 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Gospel of Life
THEO 33965 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing Power and Hope
THEO 33975 (CBL) Poverty and Development in Chile
THEO 40632 (CBL) The Heart’s Desire and Social Change
THEO 40642 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Theology of Kinship
THEO 40872 (CBL/CBR/EL) Intro to Latino Theology
THEO 40874 (CBL) Intro to Catechesis
THEO 60972 (CBL) Common Good Init: Jerusalem
THEO 60869 (CBL/CBR/EL) Intro to Latino Theology

WRITING AND RHETORIC

WR 13200 (CBL) Community Writing & Rhetoric
 

SUPPLEMENTARY MAJORS, MINORS, AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TRADITION

CST 20625 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice
CST 23470 (CBL) Sustainability at Notre Dame
CST 23476 (CBL) Just Wage Research Seminar
CST 30505 (CBL) Social Entrepreneurship
CST 33458 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Border Immersion Seminar
CST 33965 (CBL) Soc. Con. Sem: Organizing Power & Hope
CST 33997 (CBL) Rethinking Crime and Justice: Explorations from the Inside Out 

CONSTITUTION STUDIES MINOR

CNST 30423 (CBL/EL) Philanthropy: Society & the Common Good (Hesburgh Public Service)

EDUCATION

EDU 75630 (CBL) Internship & Practice I
EDU 75632 (CBL) Inquiry & Intervention I

EDUCATION, SCHOOLING, AND SOCIETY

ESS 20203 (CBL) Intro to Social Problems
ESS 30401 (CBL) Writing Ctr. Theology & Practice
ESS 30611 (CBL) Tutoring in the Community
ESS 30670 (CBL) Once Upon a Time
ESS 33627 (CBL) Literacy Development and Children
ESS 33633 (CBL) Literacy at the Library
ESS 40531 (CBL) Intro to Catechesis
ESS 30574 (CBL) The Indian School and American Culture: Native peoples, education, mascots, and more
ESS 43640 (sec. 1-4) (CBR) Seminar: Educational Research
ESS 45652 (CBL/CBR) Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study
ESS 45653 (CBL) Service on Mexican Immigration in South Bend

POVERTY STUDIES

PS 35002 (CBR) Experiential Learning-Internship
PS 43000 (CBR) Capstone Seminar: Poverty Studies

SUSTAINABILITY

SUS 20350 (CBL) Sustainability at Notre Dame and in the Holy Cross Charism
SUS 30331 (CBL/CBR/EL) Chemistry in Service of Community
 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

AEROSPACE AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

AME 30362 (CBL) Design Methodology

CIVIL ENGINEERING

CE 40701 (EL) Principles of Practice

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

CSE 20600 (sec. 2 & 28 ) (CBL/CBR) CSE Service Projects
CSE 30246 (CBL) Database Concepts
CSE 40586 (CBL/CBR) Low Vision Mentorship Project in Computer Science Education
CSE 40600 (sec. 28) (CBL/CBR) CSE Service Projects
CSE 60586 Low Vision Mentorship Project  
 

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

BIOS 40202 (EL/CBL/CBR) Developmental Neuroscience
BIOS 40450 (CBL) Clinical Research Rare and Neglected Diseases

CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY

CHEM 30331 (CBL/CBR/EL) Chemistry in Service of the Community

NEUROSCIENCE AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

NSBH 33939 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Project: Plasticity & Compassion

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND VALUES

STV 20603 (CBL) Visualizing Global Change
STV 43242 (CBL/EL) Morality, Parenting and Nature Connection in the Anthropocene

SCIENCE PREPROFESSIONAL

SCPP 46397 (CBL/CBR) Directed Readings: Pathos Project
 

KEOUGH SCHOOL OF GLOBAL AFFAIRS

GLOBAL AFFAIRS

MASTERS OF GLOBAL AFFAIRS
MGA 40806 (CBR) Visualizing Global Change
 

LAW SCHOOL

LAW 

LAW 70365 (CBL) Federal Criminal Practice
LAW 70720 (CBL) Corporate Counsel Ext-Instruct
LAW 70726 (CBL) Applied Mediation
LAW 70728 (CBL) Applied Mediation II: Advanced Domestic Relations Mediation
LAW 70730 (CBL) National Immigrant Justice Center Instruction
LAW 70733 (CBL) Public Defender Externship - Instruction
LAW 70736 (CBL) Lawyering Practice Instruction
LAW 70908 (CBL) Intercollegiate Athletics Externship Instruction
LAW 75605 (CBL/EL) Tax Clinic
LAW 75606 (CBL/EL) Tax Clinic II
LAW 75720 (CBL) Corporate Counsel Externship Fieldwork
LAW 75721 (sec. 1) (CBL) Economic Justice Clinic I
LAW 75721 (sec. 2) (CBL) Community Development Clinic I
LAW 75723 (CBL) Economic Justice Clinic II
LAW 75724 (CBL) Intellectual Property and the Entrepreneur Law Clinic
LAW 75728 (CBL) Intellectual Property Law Clinic II
LAW 75733 (CBL) Public Defender Externship
LAW 75734 (CBL) National Immigrant Justice Center Externship
LAW 75735 (CBL) Legal Externship – Public Defender
LAW 75736 (CBL) Lawyering Externship Fieldwork
LAW 75737 (CBL) Seventh Circuit Practice Externship
LAW 75800 (CBL) Appalachia Externship
LAW 75908 (CBL) Intercollegiate Athletics Externship
 

MENDOZA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION-SC

BASC 20200 (sec. 1-4) (EL) Principles of Management
BASC 20250 (sec. 7, 9,10) (CBL) Principles of Marketing

IT, ANALYTICS AND OPERATIONS

ITAO 30660 (CBL) Project Management
ITAO 70910 (CBL) Project Management

MARKETING

MARK 20100 (sec. 7-9) (EL) Principles of Marketing
MARK 30120 (CBR) Marketing Research

MANAGEMENT

MGTO 20100 (sec. 1-4) (EL) Principles of Management
MGTO 30510 ( sec. 1 & sec. 2) (CBL) Social Entrepreneurship
MGTO 70550 (CBL) Social Innovation
 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

ARCHITECTURE

ARCH 40312 (CBL) Social Factors and Sustainability: Effects of the Built Environment on Health and Well-Being
ARCH 41111 (sec. 2-4) (CBL) Design V
ARCH 51411 (CBR) Research and Documentation of Historical Buildings
ARCH 60312 (CBL) Soc. Factors & Sustainability
 

CENTERS AND INSTITUTES

CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS

CSC 33000 (CBL) Social Change Fellows
CSC 33301 (CBL) SCS: Sports and Social Concerns
CSC 33302 (CBL) Soc. Con. Sem. Spirituality/Justice
CSC 33303 (CBL) Soc. Con. Sem. Indigenous Communities: Responses to American History
CSC 33458 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Mexico-U.S. Border Immersion Seminar
CSC 33858 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: International Issues
CSC 33933 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Internship: Cross-Cultural Learning Program (CCLP, Chicago)
CSC 33936 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins
CSC 33938 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues: International
CSC 33939 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Plasticity & Compassion
CSC 33950 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia
CSC 33952 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Topics in Social Change
CSC 33961 (EL) Discernment
CSC 33962 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Gospel of Life
CSC 33965 (CBL) Soc. Con. Seminar: Organizing Power & Hope
CSC 33975 (CBL) Poverty and Development in Chile
CSC 33985 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Energy, Climate, and Social Change
CSC 33990 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Winter Service Learning
CSC 33997 (CBL) Rethinking Crime and Justice: Explorations from the Inside Out
CSC 36991 (sec. 1-4) (CBL/CBR/EL) Directed Readings
CSC 36992 (CBL/CBR/EL) Directed Readings: Summer Service Learning
CSC 60696 (CBL) Common Good Initiative: Jerusalem
CSC 63950 (CBL) Soc. Con. Seminar: Appalachia
CSC 63953 (CBL) Civic Engagement & Social Responsibility
CSC 63955 (CBL) Globalizing Nuner
CSC 63997 (CBL) Rethinking Crime and Justice

CENTER FOR STUDY OF LANGUAGES

CSLC 63000 (CBL) Globalizing Nuner

ECK INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL HEALTH

GH 60595 (CBL) International Development in Practice
GH 68550 (CBL) Capstone Seminar

INSTITUTE FOR LATINO STUDIES

ILS 20913 (CBL) Once Upon a Time
ILS 25911 (CBL) Language, Culture and Community
ILS 30145 (CBL) Immigrant America
ILS 33701 (CBL) Soc. Con. Seminar: Border Immersion
*ILS 33800 (sec. 3) (CBL) CCLP (Chicago)
ILS 33800 (sec. 4) CBL) CCLP
ILS 40807 (CBL/CBR/EL) Intro to Latino Theology
ILS 40910 (CBL) Race & Ethnicity in U.S.
ILS 41103 (CBL) Service Mexican Immigration
ILS 43103 (CBL) Mexican Immigration

KELLOGG INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

IDS 30513 (CBL) International Development in Practice: What Works in Development
IDS 40830 (CBL) Visualizing Global Change
IDS 43270 (CBL) Mexican Immigration

KROC INSTITUTE FOR PEACE STUDIES

IIPS 20101 (sec. 1 & sec. 2) (CBL) Introduction to Peace Studies
IIPS 30304 (CBL) Visualizing Global Change
IIPS 33905 (CBL) Rethinking Crime and Justice
IIPS 43503 (CBL/EL) Morality, Parenting and Nature Connection in the Anthropocene
 

NON MAIN-CAMPUS COURSES

* INDICATES NON MAIN-CAMPUS COURSES 

*AL 24107 / HIST 34502 / LLRO 36000 Rome, Italy Undergrad JCU: All Roads Lead to Rome
*AL 34002 / ESS 34360 Toledo, Spain: Toledo Internship
*AL 34721 Puebla, Mexico :Medical Internship
*ANTH 34320 / HIST 34430 / IRST 24208 / SOC 34123 (CBL)  Dublin, Ireland: Introduction to Ireland
*ANTH 34733 / THEO 34202 Santiago, Chile, (Undergrad): Poverty and Development
*CSC 34604 / THEO 34605 (CBL) London, England: Catholic Social Teaching
*ESS 34355 / SOC 44520 / THEO 34711 (CBL) Catholic Education Common Good
*HESB 34092 Washington DC: Foundations of Public Policy-PPV
*HESB 34093 Washington DC Internship
*LAW 74731 London (Law-JD): Internship
*MSBA 70950 (CBL) Chicago Graduate Business: Analytics Capstone Project
*PS 34002 Poverty Studies Internship
*SOC 24400 Spain and Immigrants
 
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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS

 

 

 

AFRICANA STUDIES

AFST 20203 / ESS 20033 / HESB 20220 / SOC 20033 (CBL)
Introduction to Social Problems
Richard Williams
Credit Hours: 3
Analysis of selected problems in American society such as crime, narcotic addiction, alcoholism, delinquency, racial and ethnic conflict, prostitution, and others. Discussions, debates, films, tapes, and readings.
 
AFST 43575 / ILS 40910 / ROSP 40876 (CBL)
Race & Ethnicity in U.S.
Marisel Moreno
Credit Hours: 4
If something has become clear following the recent termination of Mexican-American studies courses by the Tucson Unified School District (AZ) is that race and ethnicity matter when considering the condition of Latinos/as in the US. In this course students will begin by examining the events related to the AZ law and will explore how these issues are played out in Latino literature and our local Latino community. Literature by Afro-Latina/o, Andean-Latina/o (and other Latinos of indigenous descent), and Asian-Latina/o authors will provide a lens through which to explore the racial and ethnic complexities that are erased by the umbrella term "Latino." Tutoring/mentoring at La Casa de Amistad will provide an opportunity for students to see the issues studied at work in the "real world," while also fostering stronger ties between Notre Dame and the South Bend community. For the Community-Based Learning segment of the course, students will spend two hours per week volunteering and will participate in a local immersion weekend. This course will be conducted in Spanish. Spanish heritage speakers are welcome.

 

 

 

 

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 30137 (sec.1 & sec. 2) / ANTH 30117 / HIST 30765 / ESS 30574 (CBL)
The Indian School and American Culture: Native peoples, education, mascots, and more
Brian Collier
Credit Hours: 3
Native education took place in communities throughout North and South American long before Europeans arrived, but when the Europeans arrived the education took on a new form and flow first with Spanish missionary education in the presidios that dotted the new American landscape and then later in schools run out of the budget of the War Department as Grant's Peace Policy worked to "kill the Indian but save the man" a quote so often attributed to the Indian School era. Now in the modern era Native American schools are being run more and more often by Native people and for Native peoples. What has shifted in these eras to make "Indian" education change? What does the Indian School in the modern era look like? How do modern schools combat the prejudice and racism against them in other schools and in broader society?This course will discuss the history of native education both in the past and present and create digital humanities resources for some of the remaining Indian Schools in the country in conjunction with the American Indian Catholic Schools Network at Notre Dame. The useful digital humanities projects will be put to work at current schools. This is a class in which you'll both learn about the past and make a difference in the present with members of a small team from the class.
 
AMST 30145 (sec. 1 & sec. 2) / ANTH 30115 / ILS  30145 / SOC 30145 (CBL)
Immigrant America
Jennifer Huyne
Credit Hours: 3
This course offers a critical examination of what it means to be an immigrant or child of immigrants through scholarly works, memoirs, blogs, and popular journalism. Since the liberalization of immigration policy in 1965, immigrants from Latin America and Asia are becoming an increasing and emergent demographic of American society. In major American cities such as Los Angeles and New York, they comprise over 50% of the population. This course focuses on how immigrants and the children of immigrants experience the United States. How are immigrants changing the US racial and ethnic structure? How do their experiences differ given varying legal statuses? How is the second generation becoming American? We will explore these questions through readings that focus on family, religion, education, dating and sexuality. This course will include a community based learning component where students will work with immigrant serving organizations. Students will have the option to teach citizenship classes or to work with immigrant children. Service will be 2-3 hours per week outside of class.
 
AMST 30812 / CSC 33997 / CST 33997 / PSY 33691 / IIPS 33905 / HESB 30302 / CSC 63997 (CBL)
 Rethinking Crime and Justice: Explorations from the Inside Out
Susan Sharpe, Jay Brandenberger
Credit Hours: 3
What are the causes and costs of criminal behavior? How are people and communities affected by incarceration? How can we make our criminal justice system as good as it can be for all stakeholders? This course brings together students from both sides of the prison wall to explore issues including why people commit crime, what prisons are for, realities of prison life and reentry, effects of victimization, and restorative justice perspectives. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Together they examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of criminal justice policy, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities.
 
AMST 40402 / ESS 45652 / ANTH 43305 / GSC 43103 / ILS 43103 / HESB 40108 / LLRO 30883 / IDS 43270 (CBR / CBL)
Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study
Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.
 
AMST 41402 / ILS 41103 / HESB 40110 / ESS 45653 / GSC 41103 / LLRO 31883 / ANTH 41103 (CBL)
Service Mexican Immigration
Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 1
This one credit course complements the classroom course, Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case study for students who wish to extend their learning through service in the community. (Enrollment in the classroom course is a requirement, but students in the classroom course are not required to add this course.) Students will volunteer as tutors, interpreters, translators, assistants and teachers at local organizations, clinics, law offices and community agencies. The schedules for service will vary accordingly.
 
 
 
 
 

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 30115 / AMST 30145 (sec 1 & 2) / ILS 30145 / SOC 30145 (CBL)
Immigrant America
Jennifer Huyne
Credit Hours: 3
This course offers a critical examination of what it means to be an immigrant or child of immigrants through scholarly works, memoirs, blogs, and popular journalism. Since the liberalization of immigration policy in 1965, immigrants from Latin America and Asia are becoming an increasing and emergent demographic of American society. In major American cities such as Los Angeles and New York, they comprise over 50% of the population. This course focuses on how immigrants and the children of immigrants experience the United States. How are immigrants changing the US racial and ethnic structure? How do their experiences differ given varying legal statuses? How is the second generation becoming American? We will explore these questions through readings that focus on family, religion, education, dating and sexuality. This course will include a community based learning component where students will work with immigrant serving organizations. Students will have the option to teach citizenship classes or to work with immigrant children. Service will be 2-3 hours per week outside of class.

 

ANTH 30117 / AMST sec. 1 & sec. 2) / HIST 30765 / ESS 30574 (CBL)
The Indian School and American Culture: Native peoples, education, mascots, and more
Brian Collier
Credit Hours: 3
Native education took place in communities throughout North and South American long before Europeans arrived, but when the Europeans arrived the education took on a new form and flow first with Spanish missionary education in the presidios that dotted the new American landscape and then later in schools run out of the budget of the War Department as Grant's Peace Policy worked to "kill the Indian but save the man" a quote so often attributed to the Indian School era. Now in the modern era Native American schools are being run more and more often by Native people and for Native peoples. What has shifted in these eras to make "Indian" education change? What does the Indian School in the modern era look like? How do modern schools combat the prejudice and racism against them in other schools and in broader society?This course will discuss the history of native education both in the past and present and create digital humanities resources for some of the remaining Indian Schools in the country in conjunction with the American Indian Catholic Schools Network at Notre Dame. The useful digital humanities projects will be put to work at current schools. This is a class in which you'll both learn about the past and make a difference in the present with members of a small team from the class.
 
ANTH 40200 / KSGA 40200 / MGA 40806 / IIPS 30304 / IDS 40830 / FTT 30603 / SOC 40200 / STV 20603 (CBL)
Visualizing Global Change
Tamara Kay
Credit Hours: 3
The goal of the course is to compare the processes by which social scientists and filmmakers/photographers engage in social documentation. Students explore how global social problems such as rural and urban poverty, race and gender inequalities, immigration, and violence are analyzed across the social sciences, and depicted in a variety of documentary film and photography genres. The course also explores the role that documentary photography and film play in promoting rights and advocating for social change, particularly in the realm of human rights and global inequality. It examines the history of documentary film and photography in relationship to politics, and to the development of concerns across the social sciences with inequality and social justice. It also looks at how individual documentarians, non-profit organizations and social movements use film and photography to further their goals and causes, and issues of representation their choices raise. The course is also unique because it requires students to engage in the process of visual documentation themselves by incorporating an activity-based learning component. For their final project, students choose a human rights or social problem that concerns or interests them (and which they can document locally - no travel is required), prepare a documentary -exhibit- on the chosen topic (10-12 photographs), and write a 12-15 page paper analyzing how 2-3 social scientists construct and frame the given problem. Students also have the option to produce a short documentary film.
 
ANTH 41103 / ILS 41103 / HESB 40110 / ESS 45653 / AMST 41402 / GSC 41103 / LLRO 31883 (CBL)
Service Mexican Immigration
Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 1
This one credit course immerses students in service in the Latino community of South Bend as tutors, assistants, mentors, translators, etc. Students must be enrolled in the classroom course of Mexican Immigration to take this class.
 
ANTH 43305 / ESS 45652 / AMST 40402 /GSC 43103 / ILS 43103 / HESB 40108 / LLRO 30883 / IDS 43270 (CBL)
Mexican Immigration
Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.
 
 
 
 
 

ART, ART HISTORY, AND DESIGN

DESN 20203 (CBL)
DESN Matters: Intro, DESN Think
Timothy Morton
Credit Hours: 3
MATERIALS FEE. Design has come more and more to describe not only the development of objects but the process by which one shapes the interactions and experiences of people with the systems, services and organizations around us. A deeply human-centered approach to problem solving, design thinking is centered around identifying and reframing complex problems, and solving them through a more creative, iterative and hands-on approach. This course will follow a series of overlapping modules that will introduce the student to the various steps employed in the design thinking process and becoming familiar with the tools and methodologies used. The course will feature a hybrid seminar format with lectures and case studies followed by hands-on exercises and practical applications of the theories in the form of team projects. Students will be able to apply this methodology to problems of a variety of disciplines from science and engineering to business and the liberal arts. The course is the gateway for the Collaborative Innovation minor.
 
DESN 30111 (CBL)
VCD5: Scale Graphics, Narrative
Neeta Verma
Credit Hours: 3
MATERIALS FEE. This studio course focuses on development of environmental graphics and design systems in urban environments for three-dimensional spaces. It explores large-scale graphic renditions that ergonomically relate to the human body. The students work collaboratively to adapt design skills for the built environment, connecting people to the spaces they navigate and inhabit through visual messaging and building of narratives with an emphasis on transformation. Projects explore signage, large scale graphics, and environmental experiences.The design process explores messaging, story-telling and understanding the use of multi-sensory tools and technology to create and deliver poignant, effective and transformative stories and experiences.
 
DESN 40201 (CBR)
ID: Collaborative Design Development
Timothy Morton
Credit Hours: 3
This cross-disciplinary course will develop and harness useful innovation through an association of expertise from business/marketing, management entrepreneurship, chemistry, engineering, anthropology, graphic design, and industrial design. Collaborating teams of graduate and undergraduate students will engage several product development cycles, beginning with an identification of need or opportunity and concluding with comprehensive proof of concept, tests of function, specified manufacturing processes, and an appropriately resolved, aesthetically pleasing product or system. All collaborative team members will be engaged throughout the research and developmental process. Each participant will share in rotating leadership responsibilities, providing direction within their specific areas of expertise and in the context of a sequential course outline.

 

 

 

 

COLLEGE SEMINAR

CSEM 23101 (sec. 3 & 4) (CBL)
Common Good: Defining Community
Bill Purcell, Clemens Sedmak
Credit: 3
Please visit csem.nd.edu for the specific descriptions associated with each College Seminar section and to learn more about the course. College Seminar is a unique one-semester course shared by all sophomores majoring in the College of Arts and Letters at the University of Notre Dame. The course offers students an introduction to the diversity and distinctive focus of the College. Specific sections vary in topics and texts (i.e. there will not be a shared reading list), but all feature an interdisciplinary approach, commitment to engaging important questions, employment of major works, and emphasis on the development of oral skills.
 
CSEM 23101 (sec. 39 & 40) (CBL)
Great Power Politics
Rosie Sebastian
Credit: 3
Please visit csem.nd.edu for the specific descriptions associated with each College Seminar section and to learn more about the course. College Seminar is a unique one-semester course shared by all sophomores majoring in the College of Arts and Letters at the University of Notre Dame. The course offers students an introduction to the diversity and distinctive focus of the College. Specific sections vary in topics and texts (i.e. there will not be a shared reading list), but all feature an interdisciplinary approach, commitment to engaging important questions, employment of major works, and emphasis on the development of oral skills.

 

 

 

ENGLISH

ENGL 20023 / ESS 30401 (CBR)
Writing Center, Theory & Practice
Matthew Capdevielle
Credit hours: 3
A three-credit course in writing pedagogy for students working as tutors in the University Writing Center.
 
 
 
 

FILM, TELEVISION, AND THEATRE

FTT 30603 / KSGA 40200 / MGA 40806 / ANTH 40200 / IIPS 30304 / IDS 40830 / SOC 40200 / STV 20603 (CBL)
Visualizing Global Change
Tamara Kay
Credit Hours: 3
The goal of the course is to compare the processes by which social scientists and filmmakers/photographers engage in social documentation. Students explore how global social problems such as rural and urban poverty, race and gender inequalities, immigration, and violence are analyzed across the social sciences, and depicted in a variety of documentary film and photography genres. The course also explores the role that documentary photography and film play in promoting rights and advocating for social change, particularly in the realm of human rights and global inequality. It examines the history of documentary film and photography in relationship to politics, and to the development of concerns across the social sciences with inequality and social justice. It also looks at how individual documentarians, non-profit organizations and social movements use film and photography to further their goals and causes, and issues of representation their choices raise. The course is also unique because it requires students to engage in the process of visual documentation themselves by incorporating an activity-based learning component. For their final project, students choose a human rights or social problem that concerns or interests them (and which they can document locally - no travel is required), prepare a documentary -exhibit- on the chosen topic (10-12 photographs), and write a 12-15 page paper analyzing how 2-3 social scientists construct and frame the given problem. Students also have the option to produce a short documentary film.

 

 

 

FIRST YEAR OF STUDIES

FYS 13992 (CBL/EL)
Ethical Leadership
Eileen Botting
Credit 0 to 1
This year-long required course for first-year merit scholars is a lecture and discussion series on the meaning of ethical leadership and the intellectual relationship between interdisciplinary scholarship and effective public service. Scholars develop critical thinking and public speaking skills as they reflect on some of the most pressing problems and challenges of our time. The specific topics chosen for discussion - civic engagement and renewal, wealth disparity, racism, incarceration, gender inequality, environmental degradation, children's rights, etc. - often have a local as well as a global dimension. Scholars are assigned selected readings in advance of each lecture and discussion session. Scholars are also encouraged to share with their peers articles and essays that they deem especially pertinent to the lecture topic(s). Ideas and views discussed in the lecture series are meant to serve as stimuli or points of departure for the service initiatives and research projects that merit scholars typically undertake during their four years in their programs. This public lecture and discussion series featuring distinguished guest speakers from the university, senior merit scholars, the broader academy, and the local community is one of the many ways in which Notre Dame encourages its undergraduate scholars to become interdisciplinary thinkers and collaborative leaders across their diverse fields of study. Part of the course will involve "public service immersion" trips to organizations in the local community to learn about civic engagement, research, and internship opportunities. The course concludes with a self-designed final creative project, in which the scholar integrates what has been learned about leadership over the course of the semester.

 

 

 

 

GENDER STUDIES

GSC 35000 (CBL/EL)
Internship
Credit Hours: 3
This course connects students with a community-based partner organization related to the student's interests in career development and social justice. In collaboration with the Director of Undergraduate Studies, students choose a community partner organization for which they serve as an unpaid intern. In fall/spring semesters, students perform 6-8 hours of internship service per week for their chosen internship site, completing a minimum of 80 total hours. During summer session, students work 5-8 weeks full time, as defined by the internship site. Work on-site is overseen by a designated agency supervisor; coursework is supervised and evaluated by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are expected to complete a short set of readings before the internship begins. Additional assignments include: weekly journal entries; a final reflection paper that summarizes the internship experience and explores its connections to the student's Gender Studies education; an updated resume that includes the internship. This course may be taken during any of the three academic sessions in junior or senior year, and may be counted as an elective towards any Gender Studies undergraduate degree.
 
GSC 41103 / ILS 41103 / HESB 40110 / ESS 45653 / AMST 41402 / LLRO 31883 / ANTH 41103 (CBL/EL)
Service Mexican Immigration
Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 1
This one credit course immerses students in service in the Latino community of South Bend as tutors, assistants, mentors, translators, etc. Students must be enrolled in the classroom course of Mexican Immigration to take this class.
 
GSC 43103 / ESS 45652 / AMST 40402 / ANTH 43305 / ILS 43103 / HESB 40108 / LLRO 30883 / IDS 43270 (CBL/CBR/EL)
Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study
Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 3
Mexican immigrants are the fastest growing immigrant group in South Bend. This course combines experiential learning, research and service to understand and assist the Mexican immigrant community in South Bend. The course aims to understand and share information about who these new immigrants are, why they have come to the Midwest, and Chicago and South Bend, in particular, and how they are adapting and contributing to South Bend economic and social life. Students will contribute to documentation of the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homelands. Kinship networks, economic relations, political activities and religious practices simultaneously involve Mexicans in home and diaspora locations. Mexican migrants allegedly sent home about $23 billion in 2007. The Mexican government encourages the mobility of its people and offers novel ways to unify those abroad in a borderless nation. Understanding the relationship between Mexicans' immigrant integration and transnational allegiance is a key goal of the course. The course begins with a visit to the Mexican immigrant enclave of South Bend. Documentary film screenings, guest lectures and campus-wide events on immigration will complement readings about Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Students will volunteer as tutors, interpreters, translators, assistants and teachers at local organizations while learning ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Working collaboratively, students will design research plans to gather data on issues of their choosing including history of Mexican settlement in South Bend, immigrants' local and transnational households, political involvement, youth, gender, employment and business, health care, education, cultural beliefs and practices and religious life. The products of the experiential research will be published in Volume Four of the Latino Studies Student Research Series and shared with local residents, agencies and the community at large.
 
GSC 43527/ ESS 43250 / IIPS 43503 / PSY 43242 /STV 43242 / ESS 43250 / (CBL/EL)
Morality, Parenting and Nature Connection in the Anthropocene
Darcia Narvaez
Credit: 3
The course explores the cognitive and emotional aspects of moral mindsets, how they are fostered by families and cultures, what their effects are on people and planet. We develop our ecological mindset and nature connection so that we can live sustainably as members of the bio community. We examine basic needs and what is needed to prepare ourselves and others for recovering optimal human nature and planetary health in this Anthropocene age.
 
 
 

 

HESBURGH PROGRAM IN PUBLIC SERVICE

HESB 20220 / SOC 20033 / AFST 20703 / ESS 20303 (CBL)
Intro to Social Problems
Richard Williams
Credit: 3
Today's society is beset by many serious social problems, for example, crime and deviance, drug abuse and addiction, domestic violence, hunger and poverty, and racial/ethnic discrimination. How do we think about these problems in ways that lead to helpful solutions? In what ways does one's own social background and role in society affect his/her views of these problems? In this course, students will learn to take a sociological perspective not only in examining the causes, consequences, and solutions to some of society's most troubling social problems, but also in taking a critical look at their own perceptions of the problems.
 
HESB 30302 / CSC 33997 / CST 33997 / PSY 33691 / IIPS / AMST 30812 / CSC 63997 (CBL)
Explorations from the Inside Out: Rethinking Crime & Justice
Susan Sharpe
Jay Brandenberger
Credit:3
What are the causes and costs of criminal behavior? How are people and communities affected by incarceration? How can we make our criminal justice system as good as it can be for all stakeholders? This course brings together students from both sides of the prison wall to explore issues including why people commit crime, what prisons are for, realities of prison life and reentry, effects of victimization, and restorative justice perspectives. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Together they examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of criminal justice policy, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities.
 
HESB 30303 / HGTO 30510 / CST 30505 (CBL)
Social Entrepreneurship
Charlice Hurst
Credit: 3
Some of the most dynamic and successful businesses are aspiring to a "double" or "triple bottom line": profitability, beneficial human impact, and environmental sustainability. This course exposes students to a new and growing trend in leadership, venture creation, product design, and service delivery which uses the basic entrepreneurial template to transform the landscape of both for-profit and not-for-profit ventures.
 
HESB 30348 / POLS 30142 / CNST 30423 (CBL/EL)
Philanthropy: Society & the Common Good (Hesburgh Public Service)
Jonathan Hannah
Credit: 3
This course will explore the roots of philanthropy in American society, the role philanthropy plays within the modern economy, and how philanthropic activity helps us create a better world and strive for the common good. The key component of the course requires students to act as a Board of Directors and use thoughtful analysis to award real grants to deserving nonprofits (a sum up to $50,000). Students are expected to come to each class prepared to discuss course readings, and to offer ideas and suggestions regarding the grant making process. Each student is also expected to complete two site visits to nonprofit organizations outside of normal class hours. Students will nominate nonprofits for awards and the class will systematically discuss, analyze, and ultimately vote to award the grants.
 
HESB 40108 / ESS 45652 / AMST 40402 / ANTH 43305 / GSC 43103 / ILS 43103 / LLRO 30883 / IDS 43270 (CBL/CBR)
Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study
Karen Richman
Credit: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.
 
HESB 40110 / ILS 41103 / ESS 45653 / AMST 41402 / GSC 41103 / LLRO 31883 / ANTH 41103 (CBL)
Service Mexican Immigration
Karen Richman
Credit: 1
This one credit course immerses students in service in the Latino community of South Bend as tutors, assistants, mentors, translators, etc. Students must be enrolled in the classroom course of Mexican Immigration to take this class.
 
 
 
 

HISTORY

HIST 30765 / AMST 30137 (sec. 1 & sec. 2) / ANTH 30117 / ESS 30574 (CBL)
The Indian School and American Culture: Native peoples, education, mascots, and more
Brian Collier
Credit Hours: 3
Native education took place in communities throughout North and South American long before Europeans arrived, but when the Europeans arrived the education took on a new form and flow first with Spanish missionary education in the presidios that dotted the new American landscape and then later in schools run out of the budget of the War Department as Grant's Peace Policy worked to "kill the Indian but save the man" a quote so often attributed to the Indian School era. Now in the modern era Native American schools are being run more and more often by Native people and for Native peoples. What has shifted in these eras to make "Indian" education change? What does the Indian School in the modern era look like? How do modern schools combat the prejudice and racism against them in other schools and in broader society?This course will discuss the history of native education both in the past and present and create digital humanities resources for some of the remaining Indian Schools in the country in conjunction with the American Indian Catholic Schools Network at Notre Dame. The useful digital humanities projects will be put to work at current schools. This is a class in which you'll both learn about the past and make a difference in the present with members of a small team from the class.
 
 
 
 

 

MUSIC

MUS 20691 (EL)
Wind and Percussion Pedagogy
Kenneth Dye, Matthew Merten
Credit Hours: 3
Notre Dame students will learn teaching techniques on their instruments through hands-on instruction of local students in the Bandlink program. Instruction will be in individual lessons and small group rehearsals.
 
 
 
 
 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 30142 / CNST 30423 /HESB 30348(CBL/EL)
Philanthropy: Society & the Common Good (Hesburgh Public Service)
Jonathan Hannah
Credit: 3
This course will explore the roots of philanthropy in American society, the role philanthropy plays within the modern economy, and how philanthropic activity helps us create a better world and strive for the common good. The key component of the course requires students to act as a Board of Directors and use thoughtful analysis to award real grants to deserving nonprofits (a sum up to $50,000). Students are expected to come to each class prepared to discuss course readings, and to offer ideas and suggestions regarding the grant making process. Each student is also expected to complete two site visits to nonprofit organizations outside of normal class hours. Students will nominate nonprofits for awards and the class will systematically discuss, analyze, and ultimately vote to award the grants.
 
POLS 35901 (CBL/CBR)
Internship
Carolina Arroyo
Credit Hours: 1
The goal of the internship program is to provide opportunities to integrate coursework with real work experience. Internships are available throughout the Notre Dame area with a variety of government offices, non-profit agencies and NGO's. Interns work with professionals in their own area of interest, explore career options, and gain real work experience. Permission required. Does not count for the Political Science Major.
 
 
 
 
 

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 23271 (CBR/EL)
Autism Spectrum Disorder Practicum I
Kristin Wier
Credit Hours: 3
This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct educational programs with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) while acquiring an in-depth knowledge of the individual, family, community, and cultural issues surrounding the diagnosis. For the practicum portion of the course, students will work within a structured program in a family home, on-average two times a weeks for at least four hours (50 hours over the course of the semester). For the in-class portion of the course, students will meet with the instructors to discuss current research/readings, important topics, and personal experiences related to ASD. It is our hope that through this course you will begin to gain an understanding of individuals with ASD and acquire the skills to support them and their families. In addition, you will continue to develop the communication skills (written and oral) that are crucial to be a successful professional in the field of developmental disabilities. Please note that a version of this course is offered at the 40000 level which has a significant writing requirement (and has additional required coursework, see listing). Other requirements: Unless other arrangements are made, students need to have a car or regular access to transportation. Access to a car can be arranged through the Center for Social Concerns.
 
PSY 33643 / ESS 33627 (CBL)
Literacy Development and Children
Andrea Christensen
Credit Hours: 3
For students who wish to integrate theory, practice, and empirical evidence in children's learning, this course combines community-based service learning and research. Students will meet 75 minutes/week on campus to discuss readings on topics including service learning, mentoring, children's learning and development, and research methods. In addition, students will spend at least two hours/week (3pm-4pm, two weekday afternoons [M/W or T/R] for a total of approximately 25 hours) working one-on-one with an elementary school child in a local after-school literacy program. Students will keep a journal with entries for each visit with their child, and they will conduct research comparing instructional techniques, materials, or behavioral management methods. Finally, students will integrate the theory and evidence from course material with their service experience and research findings. This seminar is offered only in the fall; however, students will be encouraged to continue their service to the after-school program during the spring semester through a 1-credit ESS service-learning option. *Please note: students may need to provide their own transportation to/from the after-school program site, though every effort will be made to carpool or to include sites that are within walking distance of campus.
 
PSY 33685 / ARCH 40312 / ARCH 60312 / PSY 60685 (CBL/EL)
Social Factors & Sustainability: Effects of the Built Environment on Health & Well-Being
Kimberly Rollings
Credit Hours: 3
This course focuses on the interaction between people and the physical environment on human health, well-being, behavior, and sustainability. Social and physical factors across multiple scales - from specific environments (residential, educational, work, healthcare, and commercial), urban and natural settings, to the planet - are explored. Issues of public health, environmental justice, universal design, and culture are included throughout. Lecture and discussion class with hands-on assignments and quizzes. Upper level undergraduate and graduate students from across the University and especially in architecture, the sustainability minor, design, pre-professional studies, social sciences, and business are encouraged to enroll.
 
PSY 33691 / CSC 33997 / CST 33997 / IIPS 33905 / AMST 30812 / HESB 30302 / CSC 63997 (CBL)
Rethinking Crime and Justice: Explorations from the Inside Out
Susan Sharpe, Jay Brandenberger
Credit Hours: 3
What are the causes and costs of criminal behavior? How are people and communities affected by incarceration? How can we make our criminal justice system as good as it can be for all stakeholders? This course brings together students from both sides of the prison wall to explore issues including why people commit crime, what prisons are for, realities of prison life and reentry, effects of victimization, and restorative justice perspectives. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Together they examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of criminal justice policy, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities.
 
PSY 43242 / STV 43242 / IIPS 43503 / GSC 43527 / ESS 43250 / (CBL/EL)
Morality, Parenting and Nature Connection in the Anthropocene
Darcia Narvaez
Credit: 3
The course explores the cognitive and emotional aspects of moral mindsets, how they are fostered by families and cultures, what their effects are on people and planet. We develop our ecological mindset and nature connection so that we can live sustainably as members of the bio community. We examine basic needs and what is needed to prepare ourselves and others for recovering optimal human nature and planetary health in this Anthropocene age.
 
PSY 43271 (CBR/EL)
Autism Spectrum Disorder Practicum I-W
Kristin Weir
Credit Hours: 3
This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct educational programs with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) while acquiring an in-depth knowledge of the individual, family, community, and cultural issues surrounding the diagnosis. For the practicum portion of the course, students will work within a structured program in a family home, on-average two times a weeks for at least four hours (50 hours over the course of the semester). For the in-class portion of the course, students will meet with the instructors to discuss current research/readings, important topics, and personal experiences related to ASD. It is our hope that through this course you will begin to gain an understanding of individuals with ASD and acquire the skills to support them and their families. In addition, you will continue to develop the communication skills (written and oral) that are crucial to be a successful professional in the field of developmental disabilities. Please note that a version of this course is offered at the 40000 level which has a significant writing requirement (and has additional required coursework, see listing). Other requirements: Unless other arrangements are made, students need to have a car or regular access to transportation. Access to a car can be arranged through the Center for Social Concerns.
 
PSY 43288 (CBR)
Practicum: Child Maltreatment
Kristin Valentino
Credit Hours: 3
This course is intended to expose students to the child welfare system and the effects of child maltreatment and foster care on child development. The seminar portion of the course will include training on mandated reporting, and the child welfare system, and discussion of current research on child maltreatment, foster care, child development, and developmental psychopathology. The practicum portion of the course is designed to give students hands on experience with children in custody of the Department of Child Services in South Bend. Each student in the practicum will be paired with a child who is currently placed in foster care because of substantiated child maltreatment. The student will serve as a mentor to this child, and will spend 1-2 hours with the child twice weekly in the child's foster home.
 
PSY 60685 / ARCH 40312 / ARCH 60312 / PSY 33685  (CBL)
Social Factors & Sustainability
Kimberly Rollings
Credit Hours: 3
This course focuses on the interaction between people and the physical environment on human health, well-being, behavior, and sustainability. Social and physical factors across multiple scales - from specific environments (residential, educational, work, healthcare, and commercial), urban and natural settings, to the planet - are explored. Issues of public health, environmental justice, universal design, and culture are included throughout. Lecture and discussion class with hands-on assignments and quizzes. Upper level undergraduate and graduate students from across the University and especially in architecture, the sustainability minor, design, pre-professional studies, social sciences, and business are encouraged to enroll.
 
PSY 61383 (CBL)
Adult Assessment Practicum I
Lee Anna Clark
Credit Hours: 1-3
In this practicum, students will gain clinical experience providing psychological assessments for adults referred from a community mental-health center. They will learn to administer several semi-structured interviews, to interpret questionnaire scores, and to write comprehensive reports. Assessments will include taking a comprehensive psychosocial history, diagnosis of clinical symptoms and syndromes, assessment of personality and personality disorder, and psychosocial and daily functioning.

PSY 61385 (CBL)
Practicum I

Jennifer Hames
Credit Hours: 3
Prepares doctoral counseling students to conduct therapy. They will learn how to implement basic counseling skills, assess clinical problems, and prepare treatment plans.
 
PSY 61387 (CBL)
Practicum III
Jennifer Hames
Credit Hours: 0 - 12
Supervised clinical practicum for second-year doctoral students in counseling psychology. 
 
PSY 61389 (CBL)
Practicum V
Jennifer Hames
Credit Hours: 0 - 12
Supervised clinical practicum for doctoral students in counseling psychology.
 
PSY 61394 (CBL)
Marital Therapy Practicum 
Jennifer Hames
Credit Hours: 0 - 12
Trainees who have successfully completed the Marital Therapy Seminar register for this supervised practicum every semester. They carry cases at the Marital Therapy and Research Clinic. 
 

 
 

 

 

 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

ROSP 20201 (sec. 1-11) (CBL/EL)
Intermediate Spanish I
Andrea Topash-Rios
Credit Hours: 3
This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts. Student must have a Language Exam Score between 341 and 393 to register for this class.
 
ROSP 20202 (sec. 1-5) (CBL/EL)
Intermediate Spanish II
Maria Jose Fernandez Moreno
Credit Hours: 3
This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts. Students must have a Language Exam Score between 394 and 439 to enroll in this class.
 
ROSP 20810 / ILS 25911 (CBL)
Community-Based Spanish: Language, Culture, and Community
Maria Coloma
Credit Hours: 3
This fifth-semester language and culture course is designed for students who want to improve their communication skills in Spanish and broaden their understanding of the Hispanic world through connecting with the local Spanish speaking community. Each section may focus on different topics, such as health care, education, social services, history of immigration, and intercultural competence. The course has a required Community-Based-Learning component in which students engage with the Latino community through placements in such areas as health care, youth mentoring or tutoring programs, English as a New Language (ENL) classes, and facilitating educational workshops with parents. In this course, students integrate their service experiences with the academic components of the class through readings, research, reflective writing, and discussion.
 
ROSP 30051 / ESS 30670 / ILS 20913 (CBL)
Once Upon a Time
Rachel Parroquin
Credit Hours: 3
Students will be introduced to Literatura Infantil y Juvenil (LIJ) in the Spanish-speaking world through a combination of considerable reading of LIJ across genres and levels and a critical perspective of LIJ via academic text and articles. Authors will include prolific writers of LIJ like Alma Flor Ada, as well as widely known writers like Cortázar, Paz, Pérez Revérte, Poniatowska, and Vargas LLosa who have also begun writing children's books. Among genres read will be folklore, narrative, fiction (contemporary, realistic, historical, multicultural), fantasy, short story, poetry, and non-fiction. Students will also learn about various LIJ book awards and their evolution over time. In addition, students will develop criteria for evaluating quality LIJ. Finally, there is a Community-Based Learning (CBL) component where students will share LIJ with the local Latino community through CBL projects and/or a reading program with Latino youth. Pre-requiste: ROSP 20202 or above or placement by exam. This course can count as an advanced elective towards the major.
 
ROSP 30320 (sec. 1 & sec. 2) (CBL/EL)
Advanced Grammar and Writing
Ivis Menes
Credit Hours: 3
A further refinement of Spanish speaking and writing skills, this course is designed for students returning from abroad who wish to improve their proficiency in Spanish, and for students already in upper division- courses who seek additional assistance with writing skills and grammar.
 
ROSP 40876 / AFST 43575 / ILS 40910 (CBL)
Race & Ethnicity in U.S.
Marisel Moreno
Credit Hours: 4

If something has become clear following the recent termination of Mexican-American studies courses by the Tucson Unified School District (AZ) is that race and ethnicity matter when considering the condition of Latinos/as in the US. In this course students will begin by examining the events related to the AZ law and will explore how these issues are played out in Latino literature and our local Latino community. Literature by Afro-Latina/o, Andean-Latina/o (and other Latinos of indigenous descent), and Asian-Latina/o authors will provide a lens through which to explore the racial and ethnic complexities that are erased by the umbrella term "Latino." Tutoring/mentoring at La Casa de Amistad will provide an opportunity for students to see the issues studied at work in the "real world," while also fostering stronger ties between Notre Dame and the South Bend community. For the Community-Based Learning segment of the course, students will spend two hours per week volunteering and will participate in a local immersion weekend. This course will be conducted in Spanish. Spanish heritage speakers are welcome.

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

LLRO 30883 / ESS 45652 / AMST 40402 / ANTH 43305 / GSC 43103 / ILS 43103 / HESB 40108 / IDS 43270 (CBR/CBL)
Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study

Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.

LLRO 31883 / ILS 41103 / HESB 40110 / ESS 45653 / AMST 41402 / GSC 41103 / ANTH 41103 (CBL)
Service Mexican Immigration

Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 1
This one credit course immerses students in service in the Latino community of South Bend as tutors, assistants, mentors, translators, etc. Students must be enrolled in the classroom course of Mexican Immigration to take this class.

RUSSIAN
RU 40101 (CBL)
Advanced Russian I
Melissa Miller
Credit Hours: 3
This year-long course is designed to significantly improve students' comprehension and self-expression skills in Russian, serving as a preparation for Russian literature courses in the original. The course will include an intensive review of Russian grammar; Russian stylistics, syntax, and grammar at the advanced level; reading and analysis of a wide range of 19th-century Russian literary texts; writing essays in Russian; and extensive work on vocabulary building and advanced conversation skills.
 
 
 
 

 

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 10033 (CBL)
Introduction to Social Problems
David Sikkink
Credit Hours: 3
Today's society is beset by many serious social problems, for example, crime and deviance, drug abuse and addiction, domestic violence, hunger and poverty, and racial/ethnic discrimination. How do we think about these problems in ways that lead to helpful solutions? In what ways does one's own social background and role in society affect his/her views of these problems? In this course, students will learn to take a sociological perspective not only in examining the causes, consequences, and solutions to some of society's most troubling social problems, but also in taking a critical look at their own perceptions of the problems.
 
SOC 20033 / AFST 20703 / HESB 20220 / ESS 20203 (CBL)
Introduction to Social Problems
Richard Williams
Credit Hours: 3
Analysis of selected problems in American society such as crime, narcotic addiction, alcoholism, delinquency, racial and ethnic conflict, prostitution, and others. Discussions, debates, films, tapes, and readings.
 
SOC 30145 / AMST 30145 (sec. 1 & 2) / ILS 30145 / ANTH 30115  (CBL)
Immigrant America
Jennifer Huyne
Credit Hours: 3
This course offers a critical examination of what it means to be an immigrant or child of immigrants through scholarly works, memoirs, blogs, and popular journalism. Since the liberalization of immigration policy in 1965, immigrants from Latin America and Asia are becoming an increasing and emergent demographic of American society. In major American cities such as Los Angeles and New York, they comprise over 50% of the population. This course focuses on how immigrants and the children of immigrants experience the United States. How are immigrants changing the US racial and ethnic structure? How do their experiences differ given varying legal statuses? How is the second generation becoming American? We will explore these questions through readings that focus on family, religion, education, dating and sexuality. This course will include a community based learning component where students will work with immigrant serving organizations. Students will have the option to teach citizenship classes or to work with immigrant children. Service will be 2-3 hours per week outside of class.
 
SOC 33458 / CST 33458 / ILS 33701 / CSC 33458 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Mexico-U.S. Border Immersion
Kraig Beyerlein
Credit: 2
Spanning the fall and spring semester, this experiential-learning, Catholicism-Across-the-Disciplines-designation seminar about immigration issues—especially those related to the México-U.S. border—has three distinct parts. In the fall (two credits), we will meet in class to read and discuss social scientific research about such topics as why migrants leave their home countries, what they encounter and experience when attempting to cross the border, the responses of U.S.-based citizen groups to unauthorized border crossings, and the effectiveness of current U.S. enforcement policies. We also evaluate normatively these responses and policies, particularly from a Catholic perspective (but also other faith, non-religious perspectives). In early January, we will travel to the Southern Arizona borderlands for our weeklong immersion trip. During this trip, we will, among other things, observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, attend a humanitarian aid training, tour a Border Patrol facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from Catholic and other faith leaders about their social justice work along the border, visit Arivaca and Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community, and participate in a Samaritans’ humanitarian desert trip. After our trip, we will again meet in class for the spring semester (two credits) to process, reflect on, and expand our immersion experience, including discussing what a uniquely Catholic border policy would look like, strategies to raise awareness about what is going in Southern Arizona, and migration issues and responses to them in other parts of the world.
 
SOC 43516 (CBL)
Cultural Politics of Religion and Women's Human Rights
Shanna Corner
Credit Hours: 3
What is the relationship between religion, secularism, and women’s human rights? This course uses a sociological lens to explore important aspects of the cultural politics of religion, women’s human rights, and the relationship between them. We will problematize and move past binary explanations to examine deeper tensions involved in these relationships and in efforts to study them. As part of this course, we will read and compare key literature from the sociology of human rights, secular studies, and feminist and transnational feminist theory. Discussion of questions explored in class will be facilitated through investigation of efforts to develop specific women’s right norms within the United Nations as well as efforts to implement them within particular contexts. In addition, the community-based learning (CBL) component of this class will further advance students’ abilities to engage and critique issues and arguments we investigate.
 
SOC 45000 (CBL)
Sociology Internships
Mim Thomas
Credit: 1
The Sociology Internship[ is a community-based learning course designed to give students some practical experience in the area of urban affairs, social welfare, education, health care, or business, in order to test their interest, complement their academic work, or acquire work experience preparatory to future careers. Students are placed in a community agency in the South Bend area and normally work seven hours per week as interns under the supervision of an experienced practitioner. Scheduling hours is a flexible process in order to accommodate the intern's availability and the needs of the host agency. While there are no prerequisites, preference is given to Sociology majors, ALPP or SCPP majors, PSIM minors, and students who have had course work in an area related to social concerns. This is a graded course. In addition to field work, academic work includes reading scholarly works related to the field placement, periodic group meetings with the instructor and others in the course, periodic short reports, and a final paper. Departmental approval is required. The following is a list of agencies that have accepted interns. Students may also request placement in an agency they find on their own (subject to approval by the instructor). La Casa de Amistad Salvation Army of St. Joseph County (Social Services) Sex Offense Services of St. Joseph County (must complete paper work and training a semester in advance) Early Childhood Development Center Good Shepherd Montessori School Robinson Community Learning Center Upward Bound College Preparatory Program, UND AIDS Assist Center for Hospice & Palliative Care, St. Joseph County (usually requires two-semester commitment) Sr. Maura Brannick Health Center at Chapin Street The CASIE Center (Child Abuse Services, Investigation & Education) Family Justice Center Indiana Legal Services.

 

 

 

 

THEOLOGY

THEO 20625 (sec. 1 & 2) / CST 20625  (CBL)
Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice
Margaret Pfeil
Credit: 3
This course is designed for students who have completed a Summer Service Project Internship (SSLP or ISSLP). It affords students the opportunity to re-engage their immersion experiences. Students will employ tools of social analysis, theological reflection, and rhetoric relative to both topics such as hunger, homelessness, poverty, incarceration, and immigration, and themes such as freedom, solidarity, mimesis, power, and the preferential option for the poor. The goal of the course is to develop a theology of discipleship to which justice is integral, including considerations of worship, sustainability, social reconciliation and restorative justice. Must have completed an SSLP or ISSLP or SEMI through the CSC; contact instructor for permission to register.
 
THEO 30350 / SUS 20350 / CST 23470  (CBL)
Sustainability at Notre Dame
Margaret Pfeil
Credit: 3
This course will address sustainability in the context of the local academic community and its institutions. In light of the recent papal encyclical, Laudato Si', On Care for Our Common Home, this course will provide students interdisciplinary opportunities to explore the challenges of sustainability and to develop collaborative strategies for making our common campus homes more sustainable. This course will be offered concurrently at ND, SMC, and HCC, and will be co-taught by faculty from all three campuses. It will meet in rotation on each of the three campuses once per week for two hours. Students will be invited to examine the course materials in conversation with the mission of the Congregation of Holy Cross through immersion at each of the campuses and encounters with the sisters, brothers, and priests of Holy Cross and with sustainability professionals.
 
THEO 33858 / CSC 33858  (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: International Issues
Rachel Tomas Morgan
Credit: 1
This course revolves around international experiential learning opportunities, examining the culture, community, and life of the people encountered, including the poor. Students participate in preparation and follow-up sessions.
 
*THEO 33933 / CSC 33933 / ILS 33800 / (CBL)
Cross-Culture Leadership Program CCLP (Chicago)
Karen Richman
Credit: 3
This is a leadership internship for Cross-cultural/Urban studies working 8 weeks in a multicultural area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will work with ILS to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved. Students will complete academic requirements including readings, reflection sessions, and a presentation of a synthesis paper at the end of the internship. Application and interview necessary for participation.
 
THEO 33936 / CSC 33936 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins
Benjamin Wilson
Credit: 3
Immersion: Eight week summer service-learning placements. This three-credit course of the Summer Service Learning Program (SSLP) takes place before, during, and after student participation in the eight consecutive week summer immersion sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Notre Dame Alumni Association. The goal of the course is to reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through experiential learning, reading, writing and discussions. Writing assignments include journal assignments and a final paper. The course is completed during the first five weeks of fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. Acceptance is based on the student's application and interview. Students are required to attend SSLP formation sessions once per week in the spring prior to leaving for their immersion. Session dates are listed on the course webpage. Students will also participate in two fall small group sessions and will sign up for a time of their choosing. Contact the Center for Social Concerns for more information. Apply online via the Center for Social Concerns website: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic/. Please note, this course has extra required meeting times and/or events outside of the displayed meeting schedule. Please go to this courses designated webpage within the Center for Social Concerns website (http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/) for further details.
 
THEO 33938 / CSC 33938 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues International
Rachel Tomas Morgan
Credit: 3
This course with an 8-10 week summer international immersion is synonymous with the Center for Social Concerns' International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP). This course seeks to challenge students who have domestic service-learning experiences to encounter international realities, and to provide them the opportunity to work with community members and grassroots groups working to address the needs of their communities. The learning goals of the course are to gain an understanding of the multi-dimensionality of global poverty, gain tools for social analysis to identify root causes of poverty, and examine the ways the social institution relates to the political, social, economic and demographic conditions of the larger society (host country) in order to address poverty. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of global social issues in light of Catholic Social Teaching specifically through the themes of Solidarity and Preferential Option for the Poor. Students will develop a global citizenship orientation and outlook while strengthening cross-cultural competencies. Academic requirements include a journal, reading and writing assignments during the summer months, a mandatory day retreat on Monday, August 26, 2019, six re-entry classes meeting on Thursdays 6:30 - 7:45 pm on August 29, September 5, 12, 19, 26, October 3 and a final paper/project. Apply online via the Center for Social Concerns website: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic/
 
THEO 33950 / CSC 33950 / CSC 63950  (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia
Kyle Lantz
Credit: 1
This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion over semester break in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues. Apply online via the Center for Social Concerns website: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/social-concerns-seminars. Please note, this course has extra required meeting times and/or events outside of the displayed meeting schedule. Please go to this course's designated webpage within the Center for Social Concerns website http://socialconcerns.nd.edu for further details.
 
THEO 33952 / CSC 33952 (EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Topics in Social Change
Kyle Lantz
Credit: 1
This seminar allows students to participate in an experiential opportunity designed to examine contemporary social problems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.
 
THEO 33961 / CSC 33961 (EL)
Discernment
Michael Hebbeler
Credit: 1
The Discernment Seminar provides undergraduate students an opportunity to reflect on their encounters and discover how and where God is inviting them to be their authentic selves. Whether considering a change in major or deciding on postgraduate plans, navigating a relationship or seeking greater intentionality in daily life, students in this class will accompany each other as they explore their respective vocations and develop disciplines to listen and respond to these callings. Content will include Catholic Social Teaching, cultural critique, narrative theology, spiritual direction and the arts.
 
THEO 33962 / CSC 33962 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Gospel of Life
Kyle Lantz, Robert Kiley
Credit: 1
The goal of the Gospel of Life Seminar is to provide students with the opportunity to read and reflect on a consistent ethic of life through experiential learning. Exploration begins in the orientation classes where students will become familiar with various life issues through readings, lectures, and by meeting people who work on life-related issues. Fall break will be spent on immersion, most likely DC but location TBA for fall 2015. The seminar participants will meet with various organizations that can speak to a consistent ethic of life (government offices, NGO's, advocacy groups, etc) as well as participating in serving the local community as students engage in honoring the life of all, including those on the margins. The follow-up classes facilitate analysis and synthesis of insights gained during the week of experiential learning. For more information on the course please see: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic/fall/gospeloflife.shtml. 
 
THEO 33965 / CSC 33965 / CST 33965 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing Power and Hope
Michael Hebbeler
Credit: 1
Students are invited to experience the field of community organizing through engaging leaders from neighborhood organizations and faith communities who are actively confronting injustice and oppression. Students will analyze the contemporary situation of Midwest urban neighborhoods (Chicago, Indianapolis and South Bend), understand the role of churches influencing systems and structures, dialogue and build relationships with leaders, and participate in live social action campaigns. This experience and skillset will equip students to be agents of change by organizing for justice in their respective communities. This course requires participation in an immersion during the fall break.
 
THEO 33975 / CSC 33975 (CBL)
Poverty and Development in Chile
Jimena Holguin
Credit: 1
THEO 33975/CSC 33975 (1.0 credit) serves as the required orientation course for all students who will participate in the Approaches to Poverty and Development course offered through the Universidad Alberto Hurtado in Santiago, Chile as part of the Santiago study abroad program. The course will provide students with information regarding many of the themes and topics that will be explored further in the UAH course. This one-credit preparatory course will provide the necessary information to facilitate a richer and more meaningful experience while in Chile. Students must first be accepted into the Santiago semester abroad program through the Office of International Studies before being able to apply for this course.
 
THEO 40632 (CBL)
The Heart’s Desire and Social Change
Daniel Groody
Credit: 3
Beyond financial prosperity and material gain, many people today speak about the hunger to find purpose and meaningful work that has lasting impact on society, culture, and the global community. We not only want to find lucrative employment but to discover a way of life that resonates with the deepest part of ourselves. When we experience a consistent flow between our life's energies and our daily tasks, we are the most alive, engaged and at peace. But how can we find a way to integrate our inner and outer lives? This course will help students clarify their deepest passions in life that facilitate personal formation and social transformation. At its core it will explore the process of self-awareness and self-development that lead ultimately to self-gift. Some of the major themes we will look at include: values, spirituality, discernment, identity, true self/false self, justice, flow, freedom, Catholic Social Teaching and mission.
 
THEO 40642 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Theology of Kinship
Anthony Pagliarini, Benjamin Wilson
Credit: 3
This course is exclusively for students admitted to the Summer Service Learning Program (SSLP) who participate in eight-week summer service learning placements sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and domestic Notre Dame Clubs. The application period for the SSLP is open from November 1 to February 1 and can be found online at https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/sslp. All students in the SSLP must register for an SSLP-specific theology course. Most students take THEO 33936: Kinship on the Margins, a three-credit course graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. Theology majors and minors may elect to instead take THEO 4xxxx: Theology of Kinship, a three-credit letter-graded (A-F) course with additional academic requirements, which counts towards the theology major or minor. Students enroll in the course for the semester when they return to campus following their summer immersion, but the academic work of the three-credit course takes place before, during, and after student participation in the eight consecutive week summer immersion. The goals of Theology of Kinship are threefold: 1) Reflect theologically on one's daily service experiences using assigned course readings, 2) Critically apply the language and perspectives of Catholic social tradition to social issues encountered in contexts of marginalization, and 3) Construct a theological account of human kinship--the inherent relatedness, equal dignity, and mutual responsibility that all human persons share--in light of key concepts of theology, such as the doctrines of the Incarnation and the Trinity, the privileged place of the poor in the Bible, the relationship between liturgy and justice, and recent statements within the Church's social doctrine. Coursework includes: four mandatory class sessions in April (large group class with all SSLP students 5-6:30 pm in Geddes Auditorium on April 9 or 10, April 16 or 17, and April 23 or 24; AND one additional small group class session time TBD based on student availability with students in Theo 4xxxx); weekly assigned readings, viewing (approx. weekly) recorded lectures, and daily writing assignments throughout eight-week summer immersion; completion of SSLP Final Project and theological essay, and participating in three follow-up class sessions on campus following the immersion (Geddes Hall, Mondays 3:45- 4:45 pm, Aug 26, Sept 2, and Sept 9 -- this is just a placeholder for Anthony and Ben to determine, but I'd suggest we set the course meeting time so that students build their class schedules with these sessions in mind, whereas the one spring class session would be scheduled after students already selected their spring schedules so we should schedule it around their existing class times). All coursework is completed within the first five weeks of the fall semester. Permission required to enroll. Must apply to the SSLP online at http://socialconcerns.nd.edu and be accepted to the SSLP before enrolling.
 
THEO 40872 / THEO 60869 / ILS 40807 (CBL/CBR/EL)
Intro to Latino Theology
Credit: 3
Peter Casarella
This course examines the method and practice of Latino Theology, a theology that takes as its starting point the everyday, communal, and liberating experience of faith of the Hispanic people of God in the United States. We will explore the contributions made by Latinos to all the major theological loci (God, Christology, Ecclesiology, etc.) and also the dialogues with non-Latino and non-Christian perspectives that have enriched the theory and practice of Latino theology.
 
THEO 40874 / ESS 40531 (CBL)
Intro to Catechesis
Timothy O;Malley
Credit: 3
This course provides an introduction to the historical, theoretical, and practical foundations to the art of catechesis both in parishes and in Catholic schools. Students in the course will become acquainted with historical models of catechesis from the patristic era to the present. They will study the theological, pastoral, cultural, and pedagogical foundations of catechesis relative to both parishes and schools through attention to ecclesial documents, as well as works of catechetical theory. Lastly, students will have an occasion to practice the art of catechesis through involvement in a parish or school setting. Students in this course will have an opportunity to travel to San Francisco during fall break where we'll do catechesis in the Archdiocese of San Francisco parishes and schools. This class is affiliated with the McGrath Institute for Church Life’s outreach in catechesis. This course is an important one for those who are interested in teaching in a Catholic school or developing capacities to do catechesis in a pastoral setting either professionally or personally.

THEO 60869 / THEO 40872 / ILS 40807 (CBL/CBR/EL) Intro to Latino Theology
Intro to Latino Theology

Credit: 3
Peter Casarella
This course examines the method and practice of Latino Theology, a theology that takes as its starting point the everyday, communal, and liberating experience of faith of the Hispanic people of God in the United States. We will explore the contributions made by Latinos to all the major theological loci (God, Christology, Ecclesiology, etc.) and also the dialogues with non-Latino and non-Christian perspectives that have enriched the theory and practice of Latino theology.
 
THEO 60972 / CSC 60696 (CBL)
Common Good Init: Jerusalem
Kevin Sandberg
Credit: 2
This immersion seminar to Jerusalem enables students to engage with Israelis and Palestinians over joint efforts to foster an adoption of the common good-a foundational principle of Catholic social teaching-as a principal means to overcome the violence, distrust, and enmity that plagues progress toward peace in the Middle East. While on immersion, students will meet with diverse groups, including NGO's and Church-based ministries in the Holy Land after having been prepared during pre-departure sessions that include an introduction to the histories, religions, literatures, and cultures of the peoples at the center of the conflicts. The course objective is to understand the notion of the common good as it functions in Israeli/Palestinian societies, and as it might facilitate reconciliation and peace as these can be construed interpersonally and internationally. Apply online via the Center for Social Concerns website: soicalconcerns.nd.edu
 
 
 
 
 

WRITING AND RHETORIC

WR 13200 (CBL)
Community Writing & Rhetoric
Edward Kelly
Credit: 3
In cooperation with the Center for Social Concerns, these sections of composition place students in learning situations in the wider community where they are in contact with people who are dealing with the specific content issue of their section. We welcome students with commitment to social justice and community service to enroll.

 

SUPPLEMENTARY MAJORS, MINORS, AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS

 

 

 

 

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TRADITION

CST 20625 (sec. 1 & 2) / THEO 20625 (CBL)
Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice
Margaret Pfeil
Credit: 3
Must have completed an SSLP or ISSLP or SEMI through the CSC; contact instructor for permission to register.
 
CST 23470 / SUS 20350 / THEO 30350 (CBL)
Sustainability at Notre Dame
Margaret Pfeil
Credit: 3
This course will address sustainability in the context of the local academic community and its institutions. In light of the recent papal encyclical, Laudato Si', On Care for Our Common Home, this course will provide students interdisciplinary opportunities to explore the challenges of sustainability and to develop collaborative strategies for making our common campus homes more sustainable. This course will be offered concurrently at ND, SMC, and HCC, and will be co-taught by faculty from all three campuses. It will meet in rotation on each of the three campuses once per week for two hours. Students will be invited to examine the course materials in conversation with the mission of the Congregation of Holy Cross through immersion at each of the campuses and encounters with the sisters, brothers, and priests of Holy Cross and with sustainability professionals.
 
CST 23476 (CBL)
Just Wage Research Seminar
Dan Graff, Clemens Sedmak
Credit: 1
This research seminar enlists undergraduates in the interdisciplinary efforts of the Just Wage Working Group, a collaborative research initiative of the Higgins Labor Program at the Center for Social Concerns. Rooted in the Catholic social tradition's claim that those working for others are entitled to a "just wage," the JWWG explores the foundational question: What makes any given wage just or unjust? Students will undertake research in two ways: First, they will contribute to the common JWWG project by locating resources, marshaling evidence, and writing short reports for public use (These tasks will be assigned by the instructors.). Second, they will undertake individual research projects stemming from their own intellectual interests but dovetailing with the broader JWWG agenda, producing an essay and making a presentation at semester's end (Here they will mentored by one of the two instructors.). Students interested in this course should contact Professor Dan Graff, director of the Higgins Labor Program, at dgraff@nd.edu.
CST 30505 / MGTO 30510 / HESB 30303 (CBL)
Social Entrepreneurship
Charlice Hurst
Social Entrepreneurship (formerly MicroVenturing I) explores the innovative concepts, practices and strategies associated with building, sustaining, and replicating social impact organizations in less developed countries (LDCs) and here in the United States. Many dynamic organizations are aspiring to a "double" or "triple bottom line" - beneficial human impact, environmental sustainability, and profitability. This course exposes students to a new and growing trend in leadership, venture creation, product design, and service delivery which uses the basic entrepreneurial template to transform the landscape of both for-profit and not-for-profit ventures. In addition, students will analyze various social enterprise business models, including microfinance, microenterprise development, bottom of the pyramid, etc., and will devise strategies and tactics to improve the efficacy of these ventures, as well as engage in research seeking to advance the field of social enterprise at Notre Dame.
 
CST 33458 / SOC 33458 / ILS 33701 / CSC 33458 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Border Immersion Seminar
Kraig Beyerlein
Credit: 2
Spanning the fall and spring semester, this experiential-learning, Catholicism-Across-the-Disciplines-designation seminar about immigration issues—especially those related to the México-U.S. border—has three distinct parts. In the fall (two credits), we will meet in class to read and discuss social scientific research about such topics as why migrants leave their home countries, what they encounter and experience when attempting to cross the border, the responses of U.S.-based citizen groups to unauthorized border crossings, and the effectiveness of current U.S. enforcement policies. We also evaluate normatively these responses and policies, particularly from a Catholic perspective (but also other faith, non-religious perspectives). In early January, we will travel to the Southern Arizona borderlands for our weeklong immersion trip. During this trip, we will, among other things, observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, attend a humanitarian aid training, tour a Border Patrol facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from Catholic and other faith leaders about their social justice work along the border, visit Arivaca and Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community, and participate in a Samaritans’ humanitarian desert trip. After our trip, we will again meet in class for the spring semester (two credits) to process, reflect on, and expand our immersion experience, including discussing what a uniquely Catholic border policy would look like, strategies to raise awareness about what is going in Southern Arizona, and migration issues and responses to them in other parts of the world.
 
CST 33965 / CSC 33965 / THEO 33965 (CBL)
Soc. Con. Sem: Organizing Power & Hope
Michael Hebbeler
Credit: 1
Students are invited to experience the field of community organizing through engaging leaders from neighborhood organizations and faith communities who are actively confronting injustice and oppression. Students will analyze the contemporary situation of Midwest urban neighborhoods (Chicago, Indianapolis and South Bend), understand the role of churches influencing systems and structures, dialogue and build relationships with leaders, and participate in live social action campaigns. This experience and skillset will equip students to be agents of change by organizing for justice in their respective communities. This course requires participation in an immersion during the fall break.
 
CST 33997 / CSC 33997 / PSY 33691 / IIPS 33905 / AMST 30812 / HESB 30302 / CSC 63997 (CBL/EL)
Rethinking Crime and Justice: Explorations from the Inside Out
Susan Sharpe, Jay Brandenberger
Credit Hours: 3
What are the causes and costs of criminal behavior? How are people and communities affected by incarceration? How can we make our criminal justice system as good as it can be for all stakeholders? This course brings together students from both sides of the prison wall to explore issues including why people commit crime, what prisons are for, realities of prison life and reentry, effects of victimization, and restorative justice perspectives. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Together they examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of criminal justice policy, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities.
 
 
 
 
 

CONSTITUTION STUDIES MINOR

CNST 30423 / HESB 30348 / POLS 30142 (CBL/EL)
Philanthropy: Society & the Common Good (Hesburgh Public Service)
Jonathan Hannah
Credit: 3
This course will explore the roots of philanthropy in American society, the role philanthropy plays within the modern economy, and how philanthropic activity helps us create a better world and strive for the common good. The key component of the course requires students to act as a Board of Directors and use thoughtful analysis to award real grants to deserving nonprofits (a sum up to $50,000). Students are expected to come to each class prepared to discuss course readings, and to offer ideas and suggestions regarding the grant making process. Each student is also expected to complete two site visits to nonprofit organizations outside of normal class hours. Students will nominate nonprofits for awards and the class will systematically discuss, analyze, and ultimately vote to award the grants.
 
 
 
 
 
 

EDUCATION

EDU 75630 (CBL)
Internship & Practice I
Michael Zelenka
Credit: 2
This course engages candidates in the application and implementation of the skills and concepts of the domains of school culture, instructional leadership and executive management. Participants are given opportunities to gain leadership experience within the context of their school. As part of this course, candidates complete a leadership internship at their school, increasing their leadership capacity while receiving guided support from their instructors through performance assessments designed to deepen their professional growth and develop best practices as school leaders. Participants will also receive direct support from their on-site supervisor and regular mentoring from experienced professionals in the field.
 
EDU 75632 (CBL)
Inquiry & Intervention I
David Sorkin
Credit: 2
This course requires candidates to Participants identify and address a particular challenge facing their school related to student achievement. Over the course of the second year, candidates will use methods from the field of action research to identify an issue, research the literature and best practice, devise an intervention, collect data, conduct an analysis of the findings, and prepare a recommendation for school leaders.

 

 

 

 

EDUCATION, SCHOOLING, AND SOCIETY

ESS 20203 / SOC 20033 / AFST 20703 / HESB 20220 (CBL)
Intro to Social Problems
Richard Williams
Credit Hours: 3
Analysis of selected problems in American society such as crime, narcotic addiction, alcoholism, delinquency, racial and ethnic conflict, prostitution, and others. Discussions, debates, films, tapes, and readings.
 
ESS 30401 / ENGL 20023 (CBL)
Writing Center Theory & Practice
Matthew Capdevielle
Credit hours: 3
A three-credit course in writing pedagogy for students working as tutors in the University Writing Center.
 
ESS 30574 / AMST 30137 (sec. 1 & sec. 2) / ANTH 30117 / HIST 30765 (CBL)
The Indian School and American Culture: Native peoples, education, mascots, and more
Brian Collier
Credit Hours: 3
Native education took place in communities throughout North and South American long before Europeans arrived, but when the Europeans arrived the education took on a new form and flow first with Spanish missionary education in the presidios that dotted the new American landscape and then later in schools run out of the budget of the War Department as Grant's Peace Policy worked to "kill the Indian but save the man" a quote so often attributed to the Indian School era. Now in the modern era Native American schools are being run more and more often by Native people and for Native peoples. What has shifted in these eras to make "Indian" education change? What does the Indian School in the modern era look like? How do modern schools combat the prejudice and racism against them in other schools and in broader society?This course will discuss the history of native education both in the past and present and create digital humanities resources for some of the remaining Indian Schools in the country in conjunction with the American Indian Catholic Schools Network at Notre Dame. The useful digital humanities projects will be put to work at current schools. This is a class in which you'll both learn about the past and make a difference in the present with members of a small team from the class.
ESS 30611 (CBL)
Tutoring in the Community
Nancy Masters
Credit: 1
One credit seminar for students who are tutoring in the South Bend community. This seminar will provide tutors with an opportunity to explore the social, economic, and cultural forces that influence the lives of their students. Tutoring in the Community will give tutors the tools they need to analyze beliefs and pedagogy, improve instruction, and foster development in South Bend school children in need.
 
ESS 30670 / ILS 20913 / ROSP 30051 (CBL)
Once Upon a Time
Rachel Parroquin
Credit Hours: 3
Students will be introduced to Literatura Infantil y Juvenil (LIJ) in the Spanish-speaking world through a combination of considerable reading of LIJ across genres and levels and a critical perspective of LIJ via academic text and articles. Authors will include prolific writers of LIJ like Alma Flor Ada, as well as widely known writers like Cortázar, Paz, Pérez Revérte, Poniatowska, and Vargas LLosa who have also begun writing children's books. Among genres read will be folklore, narrative, fiction (contemporary, realistic, historical, multicultural), fantasy, short story, poetry, and non-fiction. Students will also learn about various LIJ book awards and their evolution over time. In addition, students will develop criteria for evaluating quality LIJ. Finally, there is a Community-Based Learning (CBL) component where students will share LIJ with the local Latino community through CBL projects and/or a reading program with Latino youth. Pre-requiste: ROSP 20202 or above or placement by exam. This course can count as an advanced elective towards the major.
 
ESS 33627 / PSY 33643 (CBL)
Literacy Development & Children
Andrea Christensen
Credit Hours: 3
For students who wish to integrate theory, practice, and empirical evidence in children's learning, this course combines community-based service learning and research. Students will meet 75 minutes/week on campus to discuss readings on topics including service learning, mentoring, children's learning and development, and research methods. In addition, students will spend at least two hours/week (3pm-4pm), two weekday afternoons [M/W or T/R] for a total of approximately 25 hours) working one-on-one with an elementary school child in a local after-school literacy program. Students will keep a journal with entries for each visit with their child, and they will conduct research comparing instructional techniques, materials, or behavioral management methods. Finally, students will integrate the theory and evidence from course material with their service experience and research findings. This seminar is offered only in the fall; however, students will be encouraged to continue their service to the after-school program during the spring semester through a 1-credit ESS service-learning option. *Please note: students may need to provide their own transportation to/from the after-school program site, though every effort will be made to carpool or to include sites that are within walking distance of campus.
 
ESS 33633 (CBL)
Literacy at the Library
Jodene Morrell
Credit: 3
This community based learning course is an opportunity for students to participate in the co-construction of two communities: (1) as literacy tutors at South Bend public libraries, and (2) as members of the campus research team (students enrolled in the course). We will meet once per week on campus to discuss readings related to literacy instruction and ethnographic qualitative research methods. Students will spend up to 1.5 hours per week at the library working with one to two children after school (sometime between 3:30 and 6:00 pm). Students will develop an extensive understanding of evidence-based best practices in elementary literacy instruction with a strong focus on social-emotional learning (Allyn & Morrell, 2016) to provide weekly tutoring and guide children in literacy-focused, project-based learning (Dewey, 1938). Students will also develop knowledge and skills as qualitative ethnographic researchers to contribute to the development of programming at the library to best serve the needs and interests of families in the community. The semester will conclude with a presentation of individual and team research findings and a mini-conference with the children to share their projects with the wider community. Our work will be framed by a Vygotskian sociocultural theory of learning, align with Catholic Social Teaching, and maintain a mutually beneficial relationship with area libraries and the families they serve.
 
ESS 40531 / THEO 40874 (CBL)
Intro to Catechesis
Timothy O;Malley
Credit: 3
This course provides an introduction to the historical, theoretical, and practical foundations to the art of catechesis both in parishes and in Catholic schools. Students in the course will become acquainted with historical models of catechesis from the patristic era to the present. They will study the theological, pastoral, cultural, and pedagogical foundations of catechesis relative to both parishes and schools through attention to ecclesial documents, as well as works of catechetical theory. Lastly, students will have an occasion to practice the art of catechesis through involvement in a parish or school setting. Students in this course will have an opportunity to travel to San Francisco during fall break where we'll do catechesis in the Archdiocese of San Francisco parishes and schools. This class is affiliated with the McGrath Institute for Church Life’s outreach in catechesis. This course is an important one for those who are interested in teaching in a Catholic school or developing capacities to do catechesis in a pastoral setting either professionally or personally.
 
ESS 43250 / IIPS 43503 / PSY 43242 /STV 43242 / GSC 43527 / ESS 43250 (CBL/EL)
Morality, Parenting and Nature Connection in the Anthropocene
Darcia Narvaez
Credit: 3
The course explores the cognitive and emotional aspects of moral mindsets, how they are fostered by families and cultures, what their effects are on people and planet. We develop our ecological mindset and nature connection so that we can live sustainably as members of the bio community. We examine basic needs and what is needed to prepare ourselves and others for recovering optimal human nature and planetary health in this Anthropocene age.
 
ESS 43640 (sec.1- 4)  (CBR)
Seminar Educational Research
Andrea Christensen
Credit: 3
Students will learn about both methods and topics in educational research. Students will design and execute an original research study.
 
ESS 45652 / AMST 40402 / ANTH 43305 / GSC 43103 / ILS 43103 / HESB 40108 / LLRO 30883 / IDS 43270 (CBR/CBL)
Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study
Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.
 
ESS 45653 / ILS 41103 / HESB 40110 / AMST 41402 / GSC 41103 / LLRO 31883 / ANTH 41103 (CBL)
Service in Mexican Immigration
Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 1
This one credit course immerses students in service in the Latino community of South Bend as tutors, assistants, mentors, translators, etc. Students must be enrolled in the classroom course of Mexican Immigration to take this class.
 
 
 
 

 

POVERTY STUDIES

PS 35002 (CBR)
Experiential Learning-Internship
Connie Mick
Credit: 1 to 3
Students electing to fulfill the experiential learning requirement through internships in the community (Option B) may do so by enrolling in PS 35002. Students must complete 3 credits total, but may do so in one, two, or three separate internships with corresponding credit, enrolling in PS 35002 each semester they are participating in an internship, or in the Fall semester if the internship takes place over the summer. Students will determine credit value with their internship advisor and a Poverty Studies director. For 3 credits, a student must complete 80 to 100 hours total during one semester or approximately 8 to 10 hours per week for 10 weeks, including time at the site and with the internship advisor. A 2-credit internship requires 50 to 70 total hours (or 5-7 hours for 10 weeks) and a 1-credit internship would involve 30 to 50 total hours (or 3-5 hours for 10 weeks). Students may arrange to intern for more or less than 10 weeks during the semester they are enrolled in PS 35002 and can adjust the weekly hours to correspond to the required total.
 
PS 43000 (CBR)
Capstone Seminar: Poverty Studies
Jennifer Warlick
Credit: 3
The Capstone Seminar will be topic-oriented drawing on literature from multiple disciplines. The students themselves will be from different majors and will share both the perspectives of their major disciplines as well as their varied experiences in the field thus ensuring that interdisciplinary nature of the inquiry. Experts with diverse perspectives and professional experiences will join the seminar as special guests.
 
 
 
 
 

SUSTAINABILITY

SUS 20350 / THEO 30350 / CST 23470 (CBL)
Sustainability at Notre Dame and in the Holy Cross Charism
Margaret Pfeil
Credit: 3
This course will address sustainability in the context of the local academic community and its institutions. In light of the recent papal encyclical, Laudato Si', On Care for Our Common Home, this course will provide students interdisciplinary opportunities to explore the challenges of sustainability and to develop collaborative strategies for making our common campus homes more sustainable. This course will be offered concurrently at ND, SMC, and HCC, and will be co-taught by faculty from all three campuses. It will meet in rotation on each of the three campuses once per week for two hours. Students will be invited to examine the course materials in conversation with the mission of the Congregation of Holy Cross through immersion at each of the campuses and encounters with the sisters, brothers, and priests of Holy Cross and with sustainability professionals.
 
SUS 30331 / CHEM 30331 (CBL/CBR/EL)
Chemistry in Service of Community
Marya Lieberman
Credit: 2
Addressing the problem of lead contamination in the community, students will visit area homes and collect paint, dust, and soil samples. After analyzing these samples in CHEM 31333, students will help homeowners reduce the health risks associated with exposing young children to lead.

 
 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

 

 

 

AEROSPACE AND MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

AME 30362 (CBL)
Design Methodology
David Go
Credit: 3
Modeling and analysis of mechanical systems. Automated design decision process, introduction to statistical methods, material engineering, requirements definition, and product specifications. Fall.
 
 
 
 
 

CIVIL ENGINEERING

CE 40701 (EL)
Principles of Practice
An integrated, multi-disciplinary civil engineering design experience. The course will include a review of the civil engineering design process, professional considerations and preliminary design aspects.
 
 
 
 
 

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

CSE 20600 (sec. 2 & sec. 28) (CBL/CBR)
CSE Service Projects
Gregory Madey
Credit: 1 to 3
Engineering projects in community service.
 
CSE 30246 (CBL)
Database Concepts
Timothy Weninger
Credit: 3
Effective techniques in managing, retrieving and updating information from a database system. Focusing primarily on relational databases, the course presents the entity-relationship model, query processing, and normalization. Topics such as relational calculus and algebra, integrity constraints, distributed databases, and data security will also be discussed. A final project will consist of the design and the implementation of a database system with a Web interface.
 
CSE 40586 / CSE 60586 (CBL/CBR)
Low Vision Mentorship Project in Computer Science Education
Collin McMillan
Credit: 3
In this course, Notre Dame students will be paired with students at the Illinois School for the Visually Impaired (ISVI) who are learning computer programming. ND students will work with the ISVI students to teach computer science, as well as to learn about the barriers to entry faced by low vision students to technology careers. Mentorship activities will be directed and supervised by ND faculty, and course/grade objectives align with outcomes for the ISVI students.
 
CSE 40600 (sec. 28) (CBL/CBR)
CSE Service Projects
Shreya Kumar
Credit: 1 to 3
Engineering Projects in Community Service.  
 
CSE 60586 / CSE 40586
Low Vision Mentorship Project
Collin McMillan
Credit: 3
In this course, Notre Dame students will be paired with students at the Illinois School for the Visually Impaired (ISVI) who are learning computer programming. ND students will work with the ISVI students to teach computer science, as well as to learn about the barriers to entry faced by low vision students to technology careers. Mentorship activities will be directed and supervised by ND faculty, and course/grade objectives align with outcomes for the ISVI students.
 

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

 

 

 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

BIOS 40202 (CBL)
Developmental Neuroscience
Nancy Michael
Credit: 3
This is an upper level seminar that is intended provide a deep dive into the field of developmental neuroscience, while challenging you to apply complex developmental principles to real life situations. We begin our exploration of developmental principles in the adolescent brain, rooting the student as the primary stakeholder in the content. From the very beginning of the semester, you will be challenged to consider all of the events (genetic, environmental, etc.) that have created your brain. Through discussions based in primary literature, we will then work backward through sensitive and critical periods of early childhood brain development, finishing the semester with classical cellular and molecular developmental neuroscience. Through analysis and discussion of primary literature, regular writing assignments and a strong community based learning component, the work of this course emphasizes critical review of primary literature and translation of scientific principles to individuals outside of the neuroscience field. The semester long community-based learning component will culminate with a brain-health capstone presentation to your community partner organization. The capstone design aims to have you apply all of the skills you have practiced during the semester by creating an engaging developmental neuroscience activity that requires 1) analysis and synthesis of primary literature 2) translation of that primary literature to a non-science audience that distills the information in such a way that it 3) informs and 4) motivates positive behavioral change.
 
BIOS 40450 (CBL
Clinical Research Rare Neglected Diseases
Kasturi Haldar, Barbara Calhoun
Credit: 3
A main purpose of this course is to engage upper level undergraduate and graduate students in clinical research in rare and neglected diseases. The focus for each semester is on neglected/infectious diseases with emphasis on worldwide eradication strategies. A major goal is to have Notre Dame students work on a clinical research project in class on some rare and/or neglected disease of major importance. A second important goal of this course is to develop an analogous model(s) for other neglected/infectious diseases. We hope this class will also help the students become advocates for these diseases. The course is also tied to a clinical-translational seminar series to enable students to meet with leading international experts who work in neglected diseases. The class is intended for juniors and seniors. COMMENTS: Students must obtain permission from the instructor, who then notifies the department for override

 

 

 

CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY

CHEM 30331 / SUS 30331  (CBL/CBR/EL)
Chemistry in the Service of the Community
Marya Lieberman
Credi: 2
Addressing the problem of lead contamination in the community, students will visit area homes and collect paint, dust, and soil samples. After analyzing these samples in CHEM 31333, students will help homeowners reduce the health risks associated with exposing young children to lead.
 
 
 
 
 

NEUROSCIENCE AND BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

NSBH 33939 / CSC 33939 (CBL)
Benjamin Wilson, Nancy Michael
Credit: 3
Summer Service Learning Project: Plasticity & Compassion
This course is exclusively for Neuroscience and Behavior majors who have completed SC 20450/NSBH 20450 seeking to apply the SSLP course towards the NSBH major and have been admitted to the Summer Service Learning Program (SSLP) who participate in eight-week summer service learning placements sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and domestic Notre Dame Clubs. The application period for the SSLP is open from November 1 to February 1 and can be found online at https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/sslp. All students in the SSLP must register for an SSLP-specific course. Most students take THEO 33936: Kinship on the Margins, a three-credit course graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. In lieu of THEO 33936, NSBH majors who fulfill the prerequisites may elect to take this three-credit letter-graded (A-F) course with additional academic requirements. Students enroll in the course for the semester when they return to campus following their summer immersion, but the academic work of the three-credit course takes place before, during, and after student participation in the eight consecutive week summer immersion. The goals of the Neuroscience SSLP course are threefold: 1) Reflect on one's daily service experiences using assigned course readings drawn from neuroscience and from theology; 2) understand how neuroscientific concepts help to explain human behavior and how one's current state is affected by one's past experiences; 3) apply neuroscientific understanding to cultivate greater compassion in responding to individuals who exhibit non-typical behaviors. Coursework includes: four mandatory class sessions in April (large group class with all SSLP students 5-6:30 pm on April 9 or 10, April 16 or 17, and April 23 or 24; AND one additional small group class session with students in NSBH 3xxxx); weekly assigned readings; daily writing assignments throughout eight-week summer immersion; completion of SSLP Final Project and neuroscience essay, and participating in three follow-up class sessions on campus following the immersion at a time to be determined. All coursework is completed within the first five weeks of the fall semester. COMMENTS: Permission required to enroll. Must apply to the SSLP online at http://socialconcerns.nd.edu and be accepted to the SSLP before enrolling. After your SSLP placement is determined and prior to March 10, contact Ben Wilson, SSLP Director, at bwilson2@nd.edu to request permission to register for Neuroscience SSLP course. Course is capped at 25 students.
 
 
 
 
 
 

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND VALUES

STV 20603 / KSGA 40200 / MGA 40806 ANTH 40200 / IIPS 30304 / IDS 40830 / FTT 30603 / SOC 40200 (CBL)
Visualizing Global Change
Tamara Kay
Credit Hours: 3
The goal of the course is to compare the processes by which social scientists and filmmakers/photographers engage in social documentation. Students explore how global social problems such as rural and urban poverty, race and gender inequalities, immigration, and violence are analyzed across the social sciences, and depicted in a variety of documentary film and photography genres. The course also explores the role that documentary photography and film play in promoting rights and advocating for social change, particularly in the realm of human rights and global inequality. It examines the history of documentary film and photography in relationship to politics, and to the development of concerns across the social sciences with inequality and social justice. It also looks at how individual documentarians, non-profit organizations and social movements use film and photography to further their goals and causes, and issues of representation their choices raise. The course is also unique because it requires students to engage in the process of visual documentation themselves by incorporating an activity-based learning component. For their final project, students choose a human rights or social problem that concerns or interests them (and which they can document locally - no travel is required), prepare a documentary -exhibit- on the chosen topic (10-12 photographs), and write a 12-15 page paper analyzing how 2-3 social scientists construct and frame the given problem. Students also have the option to produce a short documentary film.
 
STV 43242 / PSY 43242 / IIPS 43503 / GSC 43527 / ESS 43250 / (CBL/EL)
Morality, Parenting and Nature Connection in the Anthropocene
Darcia Narvaez
Credit: 3
The course explores the cognitive and emotional aspects of moral mindsets, how they are fostered by families and cultures, what their effects are on people and planet. We develop our ecological mindset and nature connection so that we can live sustainably as members of the bio community. We examine basic needs and what is needed to prepare ourselves and others for recovering optimal human nature and planetary health in this Anthropocene age.
 
 
 
 
 
 

SCIENCE PREPROFESSIONAL

SCPP 46397 (CBL/CBR)
Directed Readings: Pathos Project
Dominic Vachon
Credit: 1.5
Permission required. Readings focus on learning how patients, families, and healthcare professionals experience illness and healing, how the stories that patients tell become the basis for diagnosis and therapeutic response, what it's like to go through medical training and grow in identity as a physician, and the nature of the doctor-patient relationship and how it is changing. Fall and spring. Note: This course counts as a general elective.
 

 

 


KEOUGH SCHOOL OF GLOBAL AFFAIRS

GLOBAL AFFAIRS

MASTERS IN GLOBAL AFFAIRS
MGA 40806 / KSGA 40200 / ANTH 40200 / IIPS 30304 / IDS 40830 / FTT 30603 / SOC 40200 / STV 20603 (CBR)
Visualizing Global Change
Tamra Kay
Credit: 3
The goal of the course is to compare the processes by which social scientists and filmmakers/photographers engage in social documentation. Students explore how global social problems such as rural and urban poverty, race and gender inequalities, immigration, and violence are analyzed across the social sciences, and depicted in a variety of documentary film and photography genres. The course also explores the role that documentary photography and film play in promoting rights and advocating for social change, particularly in the realm of human rights and global inequality. It examines the history of documentary film and photography in relationship to politics, and to the development of concerns across the social sciences with inequality and social justice. It also looks at how individual documentarians, non-profit organizations and social movements use film and photography to further their goals and causes, and issues of representation their choices raise. The course is also unique because it requires students to engage in the process of visual documentation themselves by incorporating an activity-based learning component. For their final project, students choose a human rights or social problem that concerns or interests them (and which they can document locally - no travel is required), prepare a documentary -exhibit- on the chosen topic (10-12 photographs), and write a 12-15 page paper analyzing how 2-3 social scientists construct and frame the given problem. Students also have the option to produce a short documentary film.
 

 

 

 

LAW SCHOOL

LAW

LAW 70365 (CBL)
Federal Criminal Practice
John Blakey, Leslie Berg, Jennifer Fox
Credit: 3
Taught by a former federal prosecutor and present white-collar defense attorney, and a former state and federal prosecutor and present U.S. District Court Judge, this course focuses on strategic thinking and structural case planning in federal criminal litigation, as well as topical and ethical issues facing federal-criminal practitioners today. In particular, the course focuses on critical substantive issues in federal criminal law, and further analyzes the chronology of complicated federal-criminal investigations beginning with issues relating to the start of investigations by federal authorities, continuing with grand-jury proceedings and indictment, and finishing with strategic issues relating trial and sentencing. With regard to these stages, the instructors will present issues that the government, corporate counsel, and criminal-defense counsel face, such as the propriety of various undercover techniques, charging considerations, and decision regarding the joint representation of targets and relating to joint-defense agreements, and strategies regarding plea negotiations. This course also includes real-world case studies, and federal court observation and videotaped student presentations and discussion, based upon a pending case in Chicago, Illinois.
 
LAW 70720 (CBL)
Corporate Counsel Ext-Instruct
Michael Hays, Beth Ferrettie, Jennifer Fox
Credit: 1
The Corporate Counsel Externship course allows students to perform 8-12 hours of legal work per week in in an in-house corporate counsel office while participating in a companion weekly seminar. Placements include private sector, non-profit, and governmental corporate counsel. Students earn three credits (two of which are fieldwork credits) for an eight hour weekly field placement or four credits (three of which are fieldwork credits) for a 12 hour weekly field placement. Placements must involve substantial legal work under the careful supervision of an attorney. Placements are typically in the Michiana area, but students are free to choose placements in other regional cities including Chicago and Indianapolis. All placements must be approved by the instructor and must be finalized before a student may enroll in the course.
 
LAW 70726 (CBL)
Applied Mediation
Michael Jenuwine, Jennifer Fox, Jaimi Wood
Credit: 5
This course is open to second- and third-year law students interested in providing mediation services to individuals currently litigating disputes in the courts of St. Joseph and surrounding counties. Through this course, students will have the opportunity to serve as mediators in actual cases involving both civil and domestic relations matters, including child custody, support, parenting time, landlord-tenant disputes, contract disputes, and other matters referred by the courts for mediation. The classroom component of the course will focus on the development of mediation skills and exploration of advanced mediation topics.
 
LAW 70728 (CBL)
Applied Mediation II: Advanced Domestic Relations Mediation
Michael Jenuwine, Jennifer Fox
Credit: 1 to 4
Allows students who have satisfactorily completed Applied Mediation to progress to more advanced mediation skills as specifically applied to domestic relations cases. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.
 
LAW 70730 (CBL)
National Immigrant Justice Center Instruction
Lisa Koop, Beth Ferrettie, Jennifer Fox
Credit: 1
Four NDLS students will have the opportunity to practice immigration law under the supervision of an experienced NIJC immigration attorney by providing immigration legal services to low-income immigrants in Indiana through NIJC. NIJC will select, screen and house all cases handled through this externship. Students will meet as a class once a week for one hour of instruction on substantive immigration law and lawyering skills, guided discussion and case review. Students will spend an additional eight hours each week conducting case work. Students will handle the representation of one or more NIJC clients and seek immigration benefits before federal agencies and courts. Students will conduct initial intake interviews, identify client eligibility for immigration benefits, complete immigration applications, compile supporting documentation and write legal memoranda. There are no required courses students must take in advance of participating in this externship. However, Administrative Law (70315), Advanced Legal Research (70207), Appellate Advocacy Seminar (73314), Immigration Law (70301), and Introduction to International Human Rights (70417) are recommended. Registration is by permission only. Interested students should submit a cover letter, resume and informal transcript to Lisa Koop at LKoop@heartalliance.org.
 
LAW 70733 (CBL)
Public Defender Externship - Instruction
Gerard Bradley, Jennifer Fox, Gloria Krull
Credit: 1
Involves assisting actual public defenders in representing indigent clients at the St. Joseph County Courthouse - Trial and Misdemeanor Division. Students can expect to represent clients in many capacities, some of which include negotiating plea bargains with prosecutors; preparing and conducting bench trials; interviewing and subpoenaing witnesses; writing and filing discovery motions; and other activities within the administration of justice. Students are expected to work at the courthouse one full morning or afternoon each week. Besides the courtroom experience, students must attend class sessions that feature prosecutors, police officers, public defenders, judges, and probation officers lecturing on their duties as officers of the court. Enrollment: limited each semester at the discretion of the instructor.
 
LAW 70736 (CBL)
Lawyering Practice Instruction
Robert Jones, Beth Ferrettie, Jennifer Fox
Credit: 1
The Lawyering Practice Externship Course allows students to perform 8-12 hours of legal work per week in any court, governmental agency, nonprofit organization, or in-house corporate counsel office while participating in a companion weekly seminar. Students earn three credits (two of which are fieldwork credits) for an eight hour weekly field placement or four credits (three of which are fieldwork credits) for a 12 hour weekly field placement. Placements must involve substantial legal work under the careful supervision of an attorney or judge. Placements are typically in the Michiana area, but students are free to choose placements in other regional cities including Chicago and Indianapolis. Students may not choose placements already offered in existing local externship courses (St. Joseph County Public Defender, South Bend office of the National Immigrant Justice Center, Notre Dame Athletic Department or athletics compliance within Notre Dame's General Counsel's Office). All placements must be approved by the instructor and must be finalized before a student may enroll in the course.
 
LAW 70908 (CBL)
Intercollegiate Athletics Externship Instruction
Edmund Edmonds, Jennifer Fox, Debbie Sumption
Credit: 1
The Intercollegiate Externship will provide an opportunity for law students to gain practical experience and academic credit in intercollegiate athletics administration through a classroom component taught by Law School faculty and senior-level administrator-attorneys from Athletics and via non-classroom externship work. Potential duties include reviewing contracts; assisting in the creation and revision of departmental policy; researching legal issues related to athletics; researching compliance issues; drafting, reviewing and revising compliance education materials; and auditing eligibility and other compliance-related forms.
 
LAW 75605 (CBL/EL)
Tax Clinic
Patrick Thomas, Jennifer Fox, Jaimi Wood
Credit: 5
Students in the Tax Clinic represent low income clients in controversies with the Internal Revenue Service and in litigation in the United States Tax Court and possibly other federal courts. The clinic is located in the Clinical Law Center at 725 Howard Street. Students play a "first chair" role interviewing and counseling clients, conducting factual investigations, determining alternatives for resolving disputes, advocating on the client's behalf, and negotiating agreements with the IRS. Students may also participate in community outreach and education on taxpayer issues. The classroom portion of the course covers tax procedure and relevant substantive law along with basic lawyering skills necessary to effective representation of taxpayers. Pre-requisite: Federal Income Taxation (70605). Additional pre-requisite or co-requisite: Professional Responsibility (70807 or 70808).
 
LAW 75606 (CBL/EL)
Tax Clinic II
Patrick Thomas, Jennifer Fox, Jaimi Wood
Credit 1 to  3
Variable credit and letter-graded course open to students who have satisfactorily completed Tax Clinic I. Tax Clinic II allows students to progress to more advanced lawyering skills as applied to federal tax controversies. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.
 
LAW 75720 (EL)
Corporate Counsel Externship-Fieldwork
Michael Hays, Beth Ferrettie, Jennifer Fox
Credit: 1
The Corporate Counsel Externship course allows students to perform 8-12 hours of legal work per week in in an in-house corporate counsel office while participating in a companion weekly seminar. Placements include private sector, non-profit, and governmental corporate counsel. Students earn three credits (two of which are fieldwork credits) for an eight hour weekly field placement or four credits (three of which are fieldwork credits) for a 12 hour weekly field placement. Placements must involve substantial legal work under the careful supervision of an attorney. Placements are typically in the Michiana area, but students are free to choose placements in other regional cities including Chicago and Indianapolis. All placements must be approved by the instructor and must be finalized before a student may enroll in the course.
 
LAW 75721 (sec. 1) (CBL)
Economic Justice Clinic I
Judith Fox, Jennifer Fox, Jaimi Wood
Credit: 5
This is a 5-credit, letter-graded course providing training in basic lawyering skills, including interviewing and counseling, as well as ethics, substantive law and procedural law relevant to the representation of clients in litigation and transactions. Students represent clients under the close supervision of a clinical faculty member. The case types vary somewhat among the sections, as described below. The classroom component of the course uses a combined lecture and mock exercise format. Students are sometimes required to participate in a community education presentation. Pre- or co-requisite: Professional Responsibility (LAW 70807 or LAW 70808)
 
LAW 75721 (sec. 2) (CBL)
Community Development Clinic I
James Kelly, Judith Fox
Credit: 5
This is a 5-credit, letter-graded course providing training in basic lawyering skills, including interviewing and counseling, as well as ethics, substantive law and procedural law relevant to the representation of clients in litigation and transactions. Students represent clients under the close supervision of a clinical faculty member. The case types vary somewhat among the sections, as described below. The classroom component of the course uses a combined lecture and mock exercise format. Students are sometimes required to participate in a community education presentation. Pre- or co-requisite: Professional Responsibility (LAW 70807 or LAW 70808)
 
LAW 75723
Economic Justice Clinic II
Judith Fox, Jennifer Fox
Credit: 1
Variable credit and letter-graded course open to students who have satisfactorily completed Clinic I. Clinic II allows students to progress to more advanced lawyering skills. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.
 
LAW 75724 (CBL)
Intellectual Property and the Entrepreneur Law Clinic
Joanne Clifford, Jennifer Fox
Credit: 5
The Intellectual Property and Entrepreneurship Clinic is a 5-credit, letter-graded course providing training in basic lawyering skills, including interviewing and counseling, as well as substantive law. The classroom component of the course uses an interactive approach including lectures and mock lawyering exercises. Through this course student will work directly with clients on intellectual property issues, such as patentability searches and provisional patent applications, trademark searches and registration, as well as intellectual property license issues and agreements.
 
LAW 75728 (CBL)
Intellectual Property Law Clinic II
Joanne Clifford, Jennifer Fox
Credit: 1 to 3
The Intellectual Property Clinic is a letter-graded course providing training in basic lawyering skills, including interviewing and counseling, as well as substantive law. The classroom component of the course uses an interactive approach including lectures and mock lawyering exercises. Through this course student will work directly with clients on intellectual property issues, such as patentability searches and provisional patent applications, trademark searches and registration, as well as intellectual property license issues and agreements.
 
LAW 75733 (CBL)
Public Defender Externship
Gerard Bradley, Jennifer Fox
Credit: 1
Students who have completed the externship requirements of LAW 592A may enroll for additional cocurricular credit. Students may work in the Trial and Misdemeanor division at the St. Joseph County Courthouse, or may assist felony public defenders. Those who work for the felony public defenders must agree to work at least 60 hours over the course of the semester.
 
LAW 75734 (CBL)
National Immigrant Justice Center Externship
Lisa Koop, Beth Feffettie, Jennifer Fox
Credit: 2
Four NDLS students will have the opportunity to practice immigration law under the supervision of an experienced NIJC immigration attorney by providing immigration legal services to low-income immigrants in Indiana through NIJC. NIJC will select, screen and house all cases handled through this externship. Students will meet as a class once a week for one hour of instruction on substantive immigration law and lawyering skills, guided discussion and case review. Students will spend an additional eight hours each week conducting case work. Students will handle the representation of one or more NIJC clients and seek immigration benefits before federal agencies and courts. Students will conduct initial intake interviews, identify client eligibility for immigration benefits, complete immigration applications, compile supporting documentation and write legal memoranda. There are no required courses students must take in advance of participating in this externship. However, Administrative Law (70315), Advanced Legal Research (70207), Appellate Advocacy Seminar (73314), Immigration Law (70301), and Introduction to International Human Rights (70417) are recommended. Registration is by permission only. Interested students should submit a cover letter, resume and informal transcript to Lisa Koop at LKoop@heartalliance.org.
 
LAW 75735 (CBL)
Legal Externship – Public Defender
Gerard Bradley, Jennifer Fox
Credit: 1
Students who have completed the externship requirements of LAW 592A may enroll for additional cocurricular credit. Students may work in the Trial and Misdemeanor division at the St. Joseph County Courthouse, or may assist felony public defenders. Those who work for the felony public defenders must agree to work at least 60 hours over the course of the semester.
 
LAW 75736 (CBL)
Lawyering Externship Fieldwork
Robert Jones, Beth Ferrettie, Jennifer Fox
Credit 1 to 3
The Lawyering Practice Externship Course allows students to perform 8-12 hours of legal work per week in any court, governmental agency, nonprofit organization, or in-house corporate counsel office while participating in a companion weekly seminar. Students earn three credits (two of which are fieldwork credits) for an eight hour weekly field placement or four credits (three of which are fieldwork credits) for a 12 hour weekly field placement. Placements must involve substantial legal work under the careful supervision of an attorney or judge. Placements are typically in the Michiana area, but students are free to choose placements in other regional cities including Chicago and Indianapolis. Students may not choose placements already offered in existing local externship courses (St. Joseph County Public Defender, South Bend office of the National Immigrant Justice Center, Notre Dame Athletic Department or athletics compliance within Notre Dame's General Counsel's Office). All placements must be approved by the instructor and must be finalized before a student may enroll in the course.
 
LAW 75737 (CBL)
Seventh Circuit Practice Externship
Robert Jones, Beth Ferrettie, Jennifer Fox, Robert Palmer
Credit 1 to 2
Students will work on Seventh Circuit cases in this fieldwork course.
 
LAW 75800 (CBL)
Appalachia Externship
Robert Jones, Beth Ferrettie, Jennifer Fox
Credit: 1
The Appalachia Externship is a one credit academic externship. Students spend their fall break or spring break providing pro bono legal services at the Appalachian Research and Defense Fund of Kentucky (AppalReD), which is the federal and state-funded low income legal services provider for the Appalachian region of Kentucky. Students also participate in the Appalachia Seminar sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns, which involves several classroom sessions, reading assignments, and written assignments exploring the culture and social issues of the Appalachia region, as well as Catholic Social Teaching. This course does not meet the Skills Requirement.
 
LAW 75908 (CBL)
Intercollegiate Athletics Externship
Edmund Edmonds, Jennifer Fox, Debbie Sumption
Credit: 2
The Intercollegiate Externship will provide an opportunity for law students to gain practical experience and academic credit in intercollegiate athletics administration through a classroom component taught by Law School faculty and senior-level administrator-attorneys from Athletics and via non-classroom externship work. Potential duties include reviewing contracts; assisting in the creation and revision of departmental policy; researching legal issues related to athletics; researching compliance issues; drafting, reviewing and revising compliance education materials; and auditing eligibility and other compliance-related forms.
 

MENDOZA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

 

 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION-SC

 
BASC 20200 (sec. 1-4) / MGTO 20100  (EL)
Christopher Stevens
Credit: 3
Principles of Management
A study of the management process, including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. Emphasis is placed on executive leadership, organizational behavior, and management theory.
 
BASC 20250 (sec. 7, 9, 10) / MARK 20100 (CBL)
Principles of Marketing
Emily Garbinsky
Credit: 3
A study of markets, institutions, and the environment in which business firms operate with attention to the effect these facets, forces, and issues have on the firm's overall marketing strategy.
 
 
 
 
 
 

IT, ANALYTICS AND OPERATIONS 

ITAO 30660 (CBL)
Project Management
Christopher Corrente
Credit: 1.5
Whether you become a high-profile real estate developer, an investment banker, or an entrepreneur, in any career you'll need some project management skills to get your job done. Everyone tries to get projects finished on time and under budget, but many critical business projects fail anyway. We'll learn the steps associated with successful project management, examine some optimization techniques, learn how to use the software tools that enhance productivity, and discuss how to avoid the implementation pitfalls that cause good people doing good projects to fail. Full semester course that meets once per week; replaces ITAO 40660, IT Project Management.
 
ITAO 70910 (CBL)
Project Management
Todd Hill, Scott Siler
Credit: 2
No matter what career you go into, it will be helpful for you to have project management skills. Projects are the way a lot of business gets done, yet many people and organizations find themselves lacking project management skills. As such, it probably comes as no surprise that more projects fail than succeed. The purpose of this course is to provide you frameworks, concepts, and tools that you can use to successfully deliver business value through projects. Guided by the Project Management Institute's (PMI) Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK), we will do a deep dive into project management concepts and definitions that will prepare you to deliver projects successfully and position you to earn your Project Management Professional (PMP) certification. No project management class would be complete, however, without an underlying knowledge of popular and successful Agile project management methodologies such as Scrum and Kanban, so we will cover those frameworks and concepts as well.  Lastly, to round out your project management knowledge, we will cover what is often the most challenging part of delivering projects; Change Management or the people side of change. The underlying goal of this class is to teach you how to deliver the right solution, the right way, delivered on time and on budget, which is used and embraced by your customers to deliver business value. Put another way, this class will help you to succeed as a project manager and not become another failed project statistic.
 
 
 
 
 

MARKETING

MARK 20100 (sec. 7-9) / BASC 20250  (EL)
Principles of Marketing
A study of markets, institutions, and the environment in which business firms operate with attention to the effect these facets, forces, and issues have on the firm's overall marketing strategy.
 
MARK 30120 (CBR)
Marketing Research
Required for all marketing majors. A study of the application of scientific method to the definition and solution of marketing problems with attention to research design, sampling theory, methods of data collection and the use of statistical techniques in the data analysis.

 

 

MANAGEMENT

MGTO 20100 (sec. 1-4) / BASC 20200 (EL)
Principles of Management
A study of the management process, including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. Emphasis is placed on executive leadership, organizational behavior, and management theory.
 
MGTO 30510 ( sec. 1 & sec. 2) / BASC 20200 (CBL)
Social Entrepreneurship
Some of the most dynamic and successful businesses are aspiring to a "double" or "triple bottom line": profitability, beneficial human impact, and environmental sustainability. This course exposes students to a new and growing trend in leadership, venture creation, product design, and service delivery which uses the basic entrepreneurial template to transform the landscape of both for-profit and not-for-profit ventures.
 
MGTO 70550 (CBL)
Social Innovation
Social innovation is defined as "a novel solution to a social problem that is more effective, efficient, sustainable, or just than current solutions." This course will ground students in the theory and practice of social innovation while also developing skills through field work with South Bend partners on issues related to economic insecurity. The in-class portion of the course will utilize cases, guest speakers, articles, self-assessments, and discussion. For the field work portion, teams of students will (1) examine and strengthen processes within an organization that affect its ability to engage in social innovation and (2) assist in building organizations' capacities to leverage relationships with other entities, particularly businesses, to generate and implement innovative solutions to problems related to economic insecurity. Students will be taught to approach their work through the lens of appreciative inquiry, which is an approach to organizational development that emphasizes discovery of and capitalization upon the strengths of an organization or organizational ecosystem.
 

 

 

 

 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

ARCHITECTURE

ARCH 40312 / ARCH 60312 / PSY 33685 / PSY 60685  (CBL)
Social Factors and Sustainability: Effects of the Built Environment on Health and Well-Being
Kimberly Rollings
Credit Hours: 3
This course focuses on the interaction between people and the physical environment on human health, well-being, behavior, and sustainability. Social and physical factors across multiple scales - from specific environments (residential, educational, work, healthcare, and commercial), urban and natural settings, to the planet - are explored. Issues of public health, environmental justice, universal design, and culture are included throughout. Lecture and discussion class with hands-on assignments and quizzes. Upper level undergraduate and graduate students from across the University and especially in architecture, the sustainability minor, design, pre-professional studies, social sciences, and business are encouraged to enroll.
 
ARCH 41111 (sec. 2-4) (CBL)
Design V
John Onyango
Credit: 6
Design V involves the design of buildings within urban settings, with a special emphasis on building types in relation to cultural, ethnic, and civic priorities.
 
ARCH 51411 (CBR)
Research and Documentation of Historical Buildings
Todd Zeiger
Credit: 3
The course provides a detailed reference to the recording methods and techniques that are fundamental tools for examining any existing structure. It also includes information on recent technological advances such as laser scanning, new case studies, and material on the documentation of historic monuments. The students will get to work on a live project and help serve in saving a historic building in the city of South Bend.
 
ARCH 60312 / ARCH 40312 / PSY 33685 / PSY 60685 (CBL)
Soc. Factors & Sustainability
Kimberly Rollings
Credit: 3
This course focuses on the interaction between people and the physical environment on human health, well-being, behavior, and sustainability. Social and physical factors across multiple scales - from specific environments (residential, educational, work, healthcare, and commercial), urban and natural settings, to the planet - are explored. Issues of public health, environmental justice, universal design, and culture are included throughout. Lecture and discussion class with hands-on assignments and quizzes. Upper level undergraduate and graduate students from across the University and especially in architecture, the sustainability minor, design, pre-professional studies, social sciences, and business are encouraged to enroll.

 

CENTERS AND INSTITUTES

 
 
 
 

CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS

CSC 33000 (CBL)
Social Change Fellows
Jay Brandenberger, Melissa Marley Bonnichsen
Credit: 2
The Leadership for Social Change Course is the key course for the McNeill Leadership Fellows in the Center for Social Concerns. Working together as a learning community, these students will consider foundations to leadership in the 21st century, the dynamics of the most pressing problems our world has ever considered, and the role of vocation, discernment, catholic social teaching, and innovative leadership for social change necessary to tackle these issues upon graduation from Notre Dame.The yearlong course, offered in two sections, seeks to engage students in a rich interdisciplinary learning space to consider the multi-dimensional realities of 21st century social concerns and the skills and vocational needs necessary to bring about creative solutions and problem solving. Cohort students will form a shared learning community engaged in scholarship, research, and service. Each student is paired with a mentor who will guide them in active discernment as they reflect on the relationship between their vocation and their work for the common good. At the end of the program McNeill Fellows will be equipped with enhanced leadership skills that allow them to recognize and respond to injustice, motivate others towards works of mercy, and work toward the common good in their professional lives.For more information on becoming a McNeill Fellow please see the fellows webpage at: https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/mcneillfellows
 
CSC 33301 (CBL)
SCS: Sports and Social Concerns
Kyle Lantz
Credit: 1
This seminar will explore the vast intersections of sports and social concerns, utilizing a Catholic Social Tradition lens as a framework for discussion, analysis, and action. In U.S. culture, and one could argue global society, there are few activities more all-encompassing and engaging of diverse peoples, resources, and issues as the arena of sports. This thing we call "sports" offers a unique space to think about social concerns. The reality that sports involves vast amounts of media, time, money, people, industries, etc. creates intersections that put various social concerns at the front and center. In recent years sports have crossed paths in significant ways with issues of domestic violence, sexual assault, gender and sexuality, the role of media, the role of protest, religion, collective bargaining, racial justice, ethics, university scandals, and many more. This seminar will explore questions such as: How do sports contribute to our society's common good? How do they threaten our common good? Where does human dignity reside or get compromised in the various arenas of sports? What case studies in sports present interesting and important opportunities for social analysis and reflection? Sports ethics: What tough questions should the public and the sports industries, organizations, and schools be asking themselves in order to move toward a more just and ethical structure? How has sports culture promoted unhealthy societal norms and social concerns? How has sports culture challenged these patterns? For example, one might ask what sports has meant for people experiencing poverty? Course will involve 1 or 2 day trips where we will engage these questions with those directly in the sports industry. Apply online via the Center for Social Concerns website: https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/seminar/sports-and-social-concerns Please note, this course has extra required meeting times and/or events outside of the displayed meeting schedule. Please go to this course’s designated webpage within the Center for Social Concerns website (http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/) for further details.
 
CSC 33302 (CBL)
Soc. Con. Sem. Spirituality/Justice
Kyle Lantz
Credit: 1
The Center for Social Concerns and Campus Ministry have partnered together to offer a seminage that explores how justice is understood as an essential part of a Christian spiritual practice. Students will have the opportunity to travel to the Rio Grande Valley in Texas where they will discover, explore and engage with communities who have embodied their spiritual practices in their pursuit for peace and justice. Students will consider how Catholic Social Tradition and theology lead one to engage the work of justice. They will critically reflect on their faith and will be challenged to consider its implications amidst the gritty reality found in on the US and Mexican border. As part of this seminage, students will serve at the direction of Sr. Norma Pimentel with Catholic Relief Service, spend time with migrants and their families, in addition to volunteering at a variety of organizations that serve the migrant population. For additional information on this course please see: https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/seminars Please note, this course has extra required meeting times and/or events outside of the displayed meeting schedule. Please go to this course’s designated webpage within the Center for Social Concerns website (http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/) for further details.
 
CSC 33303 (CBL)
Soc. Con. Sem. Indigenous Communities: Responses to American History
Kyle Lantz, Brian Collier
Credit: 1
American Indian communities have experienced the impact of colonialism since the start of European contact. This course looks to trace the relationship of that contact and the impact it has had on Native American communities and societies; in particular the Red Lake Ojibwe Nation. We will study how the communities interacted with each other, and how race plays a role in that interaction, as do notions of class and gender. Most importantly when working with Native communities is that it cannot be an extractive industry. Instead we need to make sure that Native people are not talked about, but rather that Native people are consulted with a great deal when we are learning about their history, community, and culture.To this end, this course will provide ample opportunities to learn from Native people both in class meetings and the immersion experience. Just as Native history is covered in the course, this class will have an equal focus on the modern Native experience and the current topics of education, sovereignty, and cultural identity. Recently, Native American experiences were addressed in the US bishops pastoral letter on racism “Open Wide Our Hearts”. We will engage this letter as we also consider the complex role of Catholic education offered to Native communities, especially the one we will visit on Red Lake Nation. For additional information on this course please see: https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/seminars Please note, this course has extra required meeting times and/or events outside of the displayed meeting schedule. Please go to this course’s designated webpage within the Center for Social Concerns website (http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/) for further details.
 
CSC 33458 / SOC 33458 / CST 33458 / ILS 33701 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Mexico-U.S. Border Immersion Seminar
Kraig Beyerlein
Credit: 2
Spanning the fall and spring semester, this experiential-learning, Catholicism-Across-the-Disciplines-designation seminar about immigration issues—especially those related to the México-U.S. border—has three distinct parts. In the fall (two credits), we will meet in class to read and discuss social scientific research about such topics as why migrants leave their home countries, what they encounter and experience when attempting to cross the border, the responses of U.S.-based citizen groups to unauthorized border crossings, and the effectiveness of current U.S. enforcement policies. We also evaluate normatively these responses and policies, particularly from a Catholic perspective (but also other faith, non-religious perspectives). In early January, we will travel to the Southern Arizona borderlands for our weeklong immersion trip. During this trip, we will, among other things, observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, attend a humanitarian aid training, tour a Border Patrol facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from Catholic and other faith leaders about their social justice work along the border, visit Arivaca and Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community, and participate in a Samaritans’ humanitarian desert trip. After our trip, we will again meet in class for the spring semester (two credits) to process, reflect on, and expand our immersion experience, including discussing what a uniquely Catholic border policy would look like, strategies to raise awareness about what is going in Southern Arizona, and migration issues and responses to them in other parts of the world.
 
CSC 33858 / THEO 33858 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: International Issues
Rachel Tomas Morgan
Credit: 1
This course revolves around international experiential learning opportunities, examining the culture, community and life of the people encountered, including the poor. Students participate in preparation and follow-up sessions.
 
CSC 33933 / THEO 33933 / ILS 33800 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Internship: Cross-Cultural Learning Program (CCLP, Chicago)
Benjamin Wilson
Credit: 3
This is a leadership internship for Cross-cultural/Urban studies working 8 weeks in a multicultural area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will work with ILS to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved. Students will complete academic requirements including readings, reflection sessions, and a presentation of a synthesis paper at the end of the internship. Application and interview necessary for participation.
 
CSC 33936 / THEO 33936 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins
Immersion: Eight week summer service-learning placements. This three-credit course of the Summer Service Learning Program (SSLP) takes place before, during, and after student participation in the eight consecutive week summer immersion sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Notre Dame Alumni Association. The goal of the course is to reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through experiential learning, reading, writing and discussions. Writing assignments include journal assignments and a final paper. The course is completed during the first five weeks of fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. Acceptance is based on the student's application and interview. Students are required to attend SSLP formation sessions once per week in the spring prior to leaving for their immersion. Session dates are listed on the course webpage. Students will also participate in two fall small group sessions and will sign up for a time of their choosing. Contact the Center for Social Concerns for more information. Apply online via the Center for Social Concerns website: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic/. Please note, this course has extra required meeting times and/or events outside of the displayed meeting schedule. Please go to this courses designated webpage within the Center for Social Concerns website (http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/) for further details.
 
CSC 33938 / THEO 33938 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues: International
This course with an 8-10 week summer international immersion is synonymous with the Center for Social Concerns' International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP). This course seeks to challenge students who have domestic service-learning experiences to encounter international realities, and to provide them the opportunity to work with community members and grassroots groups working to address the needs of their communities. The learning goals of the course are to gain an understanding of the multi-dimensionality of global poverty, gain tools for social analysis to identify root causes of poverty, and examine the ways the social institution relates to the political, social, economic and demographic conditions of the larger society (host country) in order to address poverty. Students will gain knowledge and understanding of global social issues in light of Catholic Social Teaching specifically through the themes of Solidarity and Preferential Option for the Poor. Students will develop a global citizenship orientation and outlook while strengthening cross-cultural competencies. Academic requirements include a journal, reading and writing assignments during the summer months, a mandatory day retreat on Monday, August 26, 2019, six re-entry classes meeting on Thursdays 6:30 - 7:45 pm on August 29, September 5, 12, 19, 26, October 3 and a final paper/project. Apply online via the Center for Social Concerns website: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic/
 
CSC 33939 / NSBH 33939 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Plasticity & Compassion
Benjamin Wilson, Nancy Michael
Credit: 1
This course is exclusively for Neuroscience and Behavior majors who have completed SC 20450/NSBH 20450 seeking to apply the SSLP course towards the NSBH major and have been admitted to the Summer Service Learning Program (SSLP) who participate in eight-week summer service learning placements sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and domestic Notre Dame Clubs. The application period for the SSLP is open from November 1 to February 1 and can be found online at https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/sslp. All students in the SSLP must register for an SSLP-specific course. Most students take THEO 33936: Kinship on the Margins, a three-credit course graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. In lieu of THEO 33936, NSBH majors who fulfill the prerequisites may elect to take this three-credit letter-graded (A-F) course with additional academic requirements. Students enroll in the course for the semester when they return to campus following their summer immersion, but the academic work of the three-credit course takes place before, during, and after student participation in the eight consecutive week summer immersion. The goals of the Neuroscience SSLP course are threefold: 1) Reflect on one's daily service experiences using assigned course readings drawn from neuroscience and from theology; 2) understand how neuroscientific concepts help to explain human behavior and how one's current state is affected by one's past experiences; 3) apply neuroscientific understanding to cultivate greater compassion in responding to individuals who exhibit non-typical behaviors. Coursework includes: four mandatory class sessions in April (large group class with all SSLP students 5-6:30 pm on April 9 or 10, April 16 or 17, and April 23 or 24; AND one additional small group class session with students in NSBH 3xxxx); weekly assigned readings; daily writing assignments throughout eight-week summer immersion; completion of SSLP Final Project and neuroscience essay, and participating in three follow-up class sessions on campus following the immersion at a time to be determined. All coursework is completed within the first five weeks of the fall semester. COMMENTS: Permission required to enroll. Must apply to the SSLP online at http://socialconcerns.nd.edu and be accepted to the SSLP before enrolling. After your SSLP placement is determined and prior to March 10, contact Ben Wilson, SSLP Director, at bwilson2@nd.edu to request permission to register for Neuroscience SSLP course. Course is capped at 25 students.
 
CSC 33950 / THEO 33950 / CSC 63950 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia
Kyle Lantz
Credit: 1
This seminar involves a service-learning immersion at one of 20 sites in the Appalachian region of the United States. Students take six classes to prepare for and follow-up their immersion. While learning about the communities in this region, students focus on themes such as sustainability, rural health care, housing, education, and energy. For additional information about the course please see:https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/node/264Please note, this course has extra required meeting times and/or events outside of the displayed meeting schedule. Please go to this course?s designated webpage within the Center for Social Concerns website (http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/) for further details.
 
CSC 33952 / THEO 33952 (EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Topics in Social Change
This seminar allows students to participate in an experiential opportunity designed to examine contemporary social problems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.
 
CSC 33961 / THEO 33961 (EL)
Discernment
The Discernment Seminar provides undergraduate students an opportunity to reflect on their encounters and discover how and where God is inviting them to be their authentic selves. Whether considering a change in major or deciding on postgraduate plans, navigating a relationship or seeking greater intentionality in daily life, students in this class will accompany each other as they explore their respective vocations and develop disciplines to listen and respond to these callings. Content will include Catholic Social Teaching, cultural critique, narrative theology, spiritual direction and the arts.
 
CSC 33962 / THEO 33962 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Gospel of Life
Throughout this seminar, students will read and reflect on a consistent ethic of life. Exploration begins in the orientation classes, in which students will become familiar with various life issues (end of life, bioethics, creation care, a full concept of being pro-life, etc.) through readings, lectures, and by meeting people who work on life-related issues. The seminar will travel to Chicago to meet with various organizations, advocacy groups, and local communities serving and dialoguing around the topic of life. While in Chicago, students will also participate in direct service that honors the life of all, including those on the margins. Follow-up classes facilitate analysis and synthesis of insights gained during the week of experiential learning.For additional information on the course please see: https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/content/gospel-life-seminarPlease note, this course has extra required meeting times and/or events outside of the displayed meeting schedule. Please go to this course?s designated webpage within the Center for Social Concerns website (http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/) for further details.
 
CSC 33965 / CST 33965 / THEO 33965 (CBL)
Soc. Con. Seminar: Organizing Power & Hope
Students are invited to experience the field of community organizing through engaging leaders from neighborhood organizations and faith communities who are actively confronting injustice and oppression. Students will analyze the contemporary situation of Midwest urban neighborhoods (Chicago, Indianapolis and South Bend), understand the role of churches influencing systems and structures, dialogue and build relationships with leaders, and participate in live social action campaigns. This experience and skillset will equip students to be agents of change by organizing for justice in their respective communities. For additional information on this course please see: https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/node/3780Please note, this course has extra required meeting times and/or events outside of the displayed meeting schedule. Please go to this course?s designated webpage within the Center for Social Concerns website (http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/) for further details.
 
CSC 33975 / THEO 33975 (CBL)
Poverty and Development in Chile
THEO 33975/CSC 33975 (1.0 credit) serves as the required orientation course for all students who will participate in the Approaches to Poverty and Development course offered through the Universidad Alberto Hurtado in Santiago, Chile as part of the Santiago study abroad program. The course will provide students with information regarding many of the themes and topics that will be explored further in the UAH course. This one-credit preparatory course will provide the necessary information to facilitate a richer and more meaningful experience while in Chile. Students must first be accepted into the Santiago semester abroad program through the Office of International Studies before being able to apply for this course.
 
CSC 33985 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Energy, Climate, and Social Change
This course will integrate the complex narratives surrounding energy policy and climate change and pursue questions about how these narratives integrate with social change. The framing question for the course: How are people and communities affected by energy and climate policies? And, what sorts of efforts and opportunities are there for raising this question to the surface? Specifically, students will consider how policy and lifestyle most effect communities who are on the margins of society (nationally and globally, for example: climate refugees). The course will utilize selected readings, writing assignments, class lectures and discussions, and a week-long immersion to eastern Tennessee. During the immersion, students will engage in reflection on the large and also very practical questions surrounding this topic. They will also learn to assess the strengths and weaknesses of alternative energy technologies (wind, solar, geothermal, fuel cells, ethanol, improving fossil fuel utilization, etc.) and of the various policies and economics surrounding energy and climate. Finally, students will begin to understand the relationship between energy consumption and environmental ethics, especially as understood in Catholic social tradition. For additional information about the course, please see: https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/content/energy-climate-and-social-change. Please note, this course has extra required meeting times and/or events outside of the displayed meeting schedule. Please go to this courses's designated website within the Center for Social Concerns website (socialconcerns.nd.edu) for further details. 
 
CSC 33990 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Winter Service Learning
Only for students who applied to and were accepted into a Winter Social Concerns Seminar and who study abroad that spring semester immediately following the winter immersion.
 
CSC 33997 / CST 33997 / PSY 33691 / IIPS 33905 / AMST 30812 / HESB 30302 (CBL)
Rethinking Crime and Justice: Explorations from the Inside Out
This course includes attention to some of the issues behind the current call for criminal justice reform, including mass incarceration, racial disproportionality, and reentry challenges. Yet the focus of the course is on deeper concerns, including why criminal justice systems rely on punishment, what else they could be accomplishing, and what responsibility we have as citizens for the justice systems operating in our names. As part of the national Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program, the course involves inside students (men who are incarcerated at the Westville Correctional Facility in Westville, IN) and outside students (people enrolled at Notre Dame, St. Marys, or Holy Cross) learning with and from each other and breaking new ground together. Most weeks of the semester, campus students travel to Westville for class with the incarcerated students; all are responsible for the same reading and writing assignments, and participate together in class activities and discussions. Together the two groups examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of current criminal justice policies, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities. Apply online via the CSC website: socialconcerns.nd.edu.
 
CSC 36991 (sec. 1) (CBL/CBR/EL)
Directed Readings
Connie Mick
Research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.
 
CSC 36991 (sec. 2) (CBL/CBR/EL)
Directed Readings
Jay Brandenberger
Research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.
 
CSC 36991 (sec. 3) (CBL/CBR/EL)
Directed Readings
Danielle Wood
Research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.
 
CSC 36991 (sec.3) (CBL/CBR/EL)
Directed Readings
Clemens Sedmak
Research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.
 
CSC 36992 (CBL/CBR/EL)
Directed Readings: Summer Service Learning
Marie Donahue
Research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member
 
CSC 60696 / THEO 60972 (CBL)
Common Good Initiative: Jerusalem
This immersion seminar to Jerusalem enables students to engage with Israelis and Palestinians over joint efforts to foster an adoption of the common good-a foundational principle of Catholic social teaching-as a principal means to overcome the violence, distrust, and enmity that plagues progress toward peace in the Middle East. While on immersion, students will meet with diverse groups, including NGO's and Church-based ministries in the Holy Land after having been prepared during pre-departure sessions that include an introduction to the histories, religions, literatures, and cultures of the peoples at the center of the conflicts. The course objective is to understand the notion of the common good as it functions in Israeli/Palestinian societies, and as it might facilitate reconciliation and peace as these can be construed interpersonally and internationally. Apply online via the Center for Social Concerns website: soicalconcerns.nd.edu
 
CSC 63950 / CSC 33950 / THEO 33950 (CBL)
Soc. Con. Seminar: Appalachia
This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion over semester break in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues. Apply online via the Center for Social Concerns website: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/social-concerns-seminars. Please note, this course has extra required meeting times and/or events outside of the displayed meeting schedule. Please go to this course's designated webpage within the Center for Social Concerns website http://socialconcerns.nd.edu for further details.
 
CSC 63953 (CBL)
Civic Engagement & Social Responsibility
This seminar allows graduate students to participate in an experiential learning opportunity designed to concentrate on civic engagement and social responsibility. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.
 
 
CSC 63955 / CSLC 63000 (CBL)
Globalizing Nuner
This course is for Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistants (FLTAs) associated with the Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures (CSLC) who have been assigned to teach their native language and culture at Perley Fine Arts Academy. This course serves to equip FLTAs with the knowledge they need to succeed at Perley through readings, guest speakers, and regular reflections.
 
CSC 63997 / CST 33997 / PSY 33691 / IIPS 33905 / AMST 30812 / HESB 30302 (CBL)
Rethinking Crime and Justice
Susan Sharpe, Jay Brandenberger
Credit: 3
This course includes attention to some of the issues behind the current call for criminal justice reform, including mass incarceration, racial disproportionality, and reentry challenges. Yet the focus of the course is on deeper concerns, including why criminal justice systems rely on punishment, what else they could be accomplishing, and what responsibility we have as citizens for the justice systems operating in our names. As part of the national Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program, the course involves "inside students" (men who are incarcerated at the Westville Correctional Facility in Westville, IN) and "outside students" (people enrolled at Notre Dame, St. Mary's, or Holy Cross) learning with and from each other and breaking new ground together. Most weeks of the semester, campus students travel to Westville for class with the incarcerated students; all are responsible for the same reading and writing assignments, and participate together in class activities and discussions. Together the two groups examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of current criminal justice policies, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities. Apply online via the CSC website: socialconcerns.nd.edu.
 
 
 
 
 

CENTER FOR STUDY OF LANGUAGES

CSLC 63000 / CSC 63955 (CBL)
Globalizing Nuner
This course is for Fulbright Foreign Language Teaching Assistants (FLTAs) associated with the Center for the Study of Languages and Cultures (CSLC) who have been assigned to teach their native language and culture at Nuner Fine Arts Academy. This course serves to equip FLTAs with the knowledge they need to succeed at Nuner through readings, guest speakers, and regular reflections.
 
 
 
 
 

ECK INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL HEALTH

GH 60595 / IDS 30513 (CBL)
International Development in Practice
This course on international development has three major purposes: I) to examine diverse approaches to thinking about international development and processes that bring about individual and societal change, II) to explore the role and constraints of development projects in areas such as poverty reduction, social development, health, education, the environment, and emergency relief, and III) to develop practical skills related to project planning and management, negotiations, communications, and the evaluation of international development projects. This class aspires to develop relevant knowledge and practical skill for students interested in engaging in bringing about positive change in a complex world. The class is particularly relevant for students planning international summer service internships, studying abroad, or for those considering careers in areas related to social and economic development. The course will make use of specific case studies from Haiti, Peru, Uganda, Mexico, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Chile, among others, drawing lessons from instructive stories of failure and inspirational stories of change.
 
GH 68550 (CBL)
Capstone Seminar
The Capstone Seminar is required for all MS in Global Health students. The capstone courses span the entire year and are designed to support students as they prepare for and complete their Capstone Project as required in the MS in Global Health program. This semester's course lays the foundation for the Capstone Project and guides students as they develop their project focus. We will discuss program requirements and deadlines with regard to your Capstone Project, including the field research component. There is a focus on scientific writing and students will submit a project proposal to an evaluation committee at the end of the semester. Students are responsible for working with an identified faculty supervisor on their projects during the semester to advance the project and meet all deadlines.
 
 
 
 

INSTITUTE FOR LATINO STUDIES

ILS 20913 / ESS 30670 / ROSP 30051  (CBL)
Once Upon a Time
Students will be introduced to Literatura Infantil y Juvenil (LIJ) in the Spanish-speaking world through a combination of considerable reading of LIJ across genres and levels and a critical perspective of LIJ via academic text and articles. Authors will include prolific writers of LIJ like Alma Flor Ada, as well as widely known writers like Cortázar, Paz, Pérez Revérte, Poniatowska, and Vargas LLosa who have also begun writing children's books. Among genres read will be folklore, narrative, fiction (contemporary, realistic, historical, multicultural), fantasy, short story, poetry, and non-fiction. Students will also learn about various LIJ book awards and their evolution over time. In addition, students will develop criteria for evaluating quality LIJ. Finally, there is a Community-Based Learning (CBL) component where students will share LIJ with the local Latino community through CBL projects and/or a reading program with Latino youth. Pre-requiste: ROSP 20202 or above or placement by exam. This course can count as an advanced elective towards the major.
 
ILS 25911 / ROSP 20810 (CBL)
Language, Culture and Community
This fifth-semester language and culture course is designed for students who want to improve their communication skills in Spanish and broaden their understanding of the Hispanic world through connecting with the local Spanish speaking community. Each section may focus on different topics, such as health care, education, social services, history of immigration, and intercultural competence. The course has a required Community-Based-Learning component in which students engage with the Latino community through placements in such areas as health care, youth mentoring or tutoring programs, English as a New Language (ENL) classes, and facilitating educational workshops with parents. In this course, students integrate their service experiences with the academic components of the class through readings, research, reflective writing, and discussion.
 
ILS 30145 / AMST  (sec 1 & 2) / ANTH 30115 / SOC 30145 (CBL)
Immigrant America
This course offers a critical examination of what it means to be an immigrant or child of immigrants through scholarly works, memoirs, blogs, and popular journalism. Since the liberalization of immigration policy in 1965, immigrants from Latin America and Asia are becoming an increasing and emergent demographic of American society. In major American cities such as Los Angeles and New York, they comprise over 50% of the population. This course focuses on how immigrants and the children of immigrants experience the United States. How are immigrants changing the US racial and ethnic structure? How do their experiences differ given varying legal statuses? How is the second generation becoming American? We will explore these questions through readings that focus on family, religion, education, dating and sexuality. This course will include a community based learning component where students will work with immigrant serving organizations. Students will have the option to teach citizenship classes or to work with immigrant children. Service will be 2-3 hours per week outside of class.
 
ILS 33701 / SOC 33458 / CST 33458 / CSC 33458 (CBL)
Soc. Con. Seminar: Border Immersion
Spanning the fall and spring semester, this experiential-learning, Catholicism-Across-the-Disciplines-designation seminar about immigration issues?especially those related to the México-U.S. border?has three distinct parts. In the fall (two credits), we will meet in class to read and discuss social scientific research about such topics as why migrants leave their home countries, what they encounter and experience when attempting to cross the border, the responses of U.S.-based citizen groups to unauthorized border crossings, and the effectiveness of current U.S. enforcement policies. We also evaluate normatively these responses and policies, particularly from a Catholic perspective (but also other faith, non-religious perspectives).In early January, we will travel to the Southern Arizona borderlands for our weeklong immersion trip. During this trip, we will, among other things, observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, attend a humanitarian aid training, tour a Border Patrol facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from Catholic and other faith leaders about their social justice work along the border, visit Arivaca and Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community, and participate in a Samaritans? humanitarian desert trip.After our trip, we will again meet in class for the spring semester (two credits) to process, reflect on, and expand our immersion experience, including discussing what a uniquely Catholic border policy would look like, strategies to raise awareness about what is going in Southern Arizona, and migration issues and responses to them in other parts of the world.
 
*ILS 33800 (sec. 3) / CSC 33933 / THEO 33800(CBL)
Cross-Culture Leadership Program CCLP (Chicago)
Karen Richman
Credit: 3
This is a leadership internship for Cross-cultural/Urban studies working 8 weeks in a multicultural area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will work with ILS to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved. Students will complete academic requirements including readings, reflection sessions, and a presentation of a synthesis paper at the end of the internship. Application and interview necessary for participation.
 
ILS 33800 (sec. 4)
Cross-Culture Leadership Program CCLP
TBA
Credit: 3
This is a leadership internship for Cross-cultural/Urban studies working 8 weeks in a multicultural area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will work with ILS to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved. Students will complete academic requirements including readings, reflection sessions, and a presentation of a synthesis paper at the end of the internship. Application and interview necessary for participation.
 
ILS 40807 / THEO 40872 / THEO 60869 (CBL/CBR/EL)
Intro to Latino Theology
Credit: 3
Peter Casarella
This course examines the method and practice of Latino Theology, a theology that takes as its starting point the everyday, communal, and liberating experience of faith of the Hispanic people of God in the United States. We will explore the contributions made by Latinos to all the major theological loci (God, Christology, Ecclesiology, etc.) and also the dialogues with non-Latino and non-Christian perspectives that have enriched the theory and practice of Latino theology.
ILS 40910 / AFST 43575 / ROSP 40876 (CBL)
Race & Ethnicity in U.S.
Marisel Moreno
Credit: 1
If something has become clear following the recent termination of Mexican-American studies courses by the Tucson Unified School District (AZ) is that race and ethnicity matter when considering the condition of Latinos/as in the US. In this course students will begin by examining the events related to the AZ law and will explore how these issues are played out in Latino literature and our local Latino community. Literature by Afro-Latina/o, Andean-Latina/o (and other Latinos of indigenous descent), and Asian-Latina/o authors will provide a lens through which to explore the racial and ethnic complexities that are erased by the umbrella term "Latino." Tutoring/mentoring at La Casa de Amistad will provide an opportunity for students to see the issues studied at work in the "real world," while also fostering stronger ties between Notre Dame and the South Bend community. For the Community-Based Learning segment of the course, students will spend two hours per week volunteering and will participate in a local immersion weekend. This course will be conducted in Spanish. Spanish heritage speakers are welcome.
 
ILS 41103 / HESB 40110 / ESS 45653 / AMST 41402 / GSC 41103 / LLRO 31883/ ANTH 41103 (CBL)
Service Mexican Immigration
Karen Richman
Credit: 1
This one credit course immerses students in service in the Latino community of South Bend as tutors, assistants, mentors, translators, etc. Students must be enrolled in the classroom course of Mexican Immigration to take this class.
 
ILS 43103 / ESS 45652 / AMST 40402 / ANTH 43305 / GSC 43103 / HESB 40108 / LLRO 30883 / IDS 43270(CBL)
Mexican Immigration
Karen Richman
Credit: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.
 
 
 
 
 
 

KELLOGG INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

 
INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
IDS 30513 / GH 60595 (CBL)
International Development in Practice: What Works in Development
Stephen Reifenberg
Credit:3
This class aspires to develop relevant knowledge and practical skills for students interested in engaging in positive change in a complex world. In this course on international development, students will: 1) examine the processes that bring about individual and societal change in an international context;2) explore the roles, complexities, opportunities and constraints of development projects in areas such as poverty reduction, social development, health and education; and, 3) develop practical skills related to project design, planning, management, negotiations, communications, and the evaluation of international development projects. A central theme of the course is to understand what have we learned over the past decades from systematic research and from experience in the field about "what works." The course makes use of cases studies and draws lessons from instructive stories of failure as well as inspirational stories of change. The course focuses significant attention on "bright spots" in development- specific interventions that have made meaningful contributions. The course aspires to help train students to think like creative, effective, and thoughtful development professionals. A central feature of the course will be the opportunity to work throughout the semester as a member of a "Development Advisory Team" directly with an international development organization client who has identified a specific problem or opportunity. Development clients for the class are organizations in Bangladesh, Chile, Haiti, and India, among others.
 
IDS 40830 / KSGA 40200 / MGA 40806 / ANTH 40200 / IIPS 30304 / FTT 30603 / SOC 40200 / STV 20603 (CBL)
Visualizing Global Change
Tamara Kay
Credit: 3
The goal of the course is to compare the processes by which social scientists and filmmakers/photographers engage in social documentation. Students explore how global social problems such as rural and urban poverty, race and gender inequalities, immigration, and violence are analyzed across the social sciences, and depicted in a variety of documentary film and photography genres. The course also explores the role that documentary photography and film play in promoting rights and advocating for social change, particularly in the realm of human rights and global inequality. It examines the history of documentary film and photography in relationship to politics, and to the development of concerns across the social sciences with inequality and social justice. It also looks at how individual documentarians, non-profit organizations and social movements use film and photography to further their goals and causes, and issues of representation their choices raise. The course is also unique because it requires students to engage in the process of visual documentation themselves by incorporating an activity-based learning component. For their final project, students choose a human rights or social problem that concerns or interests them (and which they can document locally - no travel is required), prepare a documentary -exhibit- on the chosen topic (10-12 photographs), and write a 12-15 page paper analyzing how 2-3 social scientists construct and frame the given problem. Students also have the option to produce a short documentary film.
 
IDS 43270 / ESS 45652 / AMST 40402 / ANTH 43305 / GSC 43103 / ILS 43103 / HESB 40108 / LLRO 30883(CBL)
Mexican Immigration
Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.
 
IDS 40830 / KSGA 40200 / MGA 40806 / ANTH 40200 / IIPS 30304 / FTT 30603 / SOC 40200 / STV 20603 (CBL)
Visualizing Global Change
Tamara Kay
Credit: 3
The goal of the course is to compare the processes by which social scientists and filmmakers/photographers engage in social documentation. Students explore how global social problems such as rural and urban poverty, race and gender inequalities, immigration, and violence are analyzed across the social sciences, and depicted in a variety of documentary film and photography genres. The course also explores the role that documentary photography and film play in promoting rights and advocating for social change, particularly in the realm of human rights and global inequality. It examines the history of documentary film and photography in relationship to politics, and to the development of concerns across the social sciences with inequality and social justice. It also looks at how individual documentarians, non-profit organizations and social movements use film and photography to further their goals and causes, and issues of representation their choices raise. The course is also unique because it requires students to engage in the process of visual documentation themselves by incorporating an activity-based learning component. For their final project, students choose a human rights or social problem that concerns or interests them (and which they can document locally - no travel is required), prepare a documentary -exhibit- on the chosen topic (10-12 photographs), and write a 12-15 page paper analyzing how 2-3 social scientists construct and frame the given problem. Students also have the option to produce a short documentary film.
 
IDS 43270 / ESS 45652 / AMST 40402 / ANTH 43305 / GSC 43103 / ILS 43103 / HESB 40108 / LLRO 30883(CBL)
Mexican Immigration
Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.

 

 

 

KROC INSTITUTE FOR PEACE STUDIES

IIPS 20101 (sec. 1)  (CBL)
Introduction to Peace Studies
Angela Lederach
Credit: 3
Although the Cold War ended in 1989, civil war, genocide and state repression continue to occur across the globe, while millions barely have the means to survive in the face of overwhelming poverty. Nevertheless, we have also witnessed the emergence of sophisticated civil society networks and social movements to address these challenges, as well as governmental and transnational institutions committed to promoting justice and peace in the aftermath of political violence. This course is designed to introduce students to the various ways scholars and activists define peace and the challenges faced in securing peace. This course surveys: (1) the major causes of direct and structural violence; (2) various definitions of "peace" and the conditions under which it occurs and is sustained; and (3) the comparative success of various strategies such as building peace movements and promoting nonviolent social change.
 
IIPS 20101 (sec. 2) (CBL)
Introduction to Peace Studies
Ernesto Verdeja
Credit: 3
Although the Cold War ended in 1989, civil war, genocide and state repression continue to occur across the globe, while millions barely have the means to survive in the face of overwhelming poverty. Nevertheless, we have also witnessed the emergence of sophisticated civil society networks and social movements to address these challenges, as well as governmental and transnational institutions committed to promoting justice and peace in the aftermath of political violence. This course is designed to introduce students to the various ways scholars and activists define peace and the challenges faced in securing peace. This course surveys: (1) the major causes of direct and structural violence; (2) various definitions of "peace" and the conditions under which it occurs and is sustained; and (3) the comparative success of various strategies such as building peace movements and promoting nonviolent social change.
 
IIPS 30304 / KSGA 40200 / MGA 40806 / ANTH / 40200 / IDS 40830 / FTT 30603 / SOC 40200 / STV 20603 (CBL)
Visualizing Global Change
Tamara Kay
Credit: 3
The goal of the course is to compare the processes by which social scientists and filmmakers/photographers engage in social documentation. Students explore how global social problems such as rural and urban poverty, race and gender inequalities, immigration, and violence are analyzed across the social sciences, and depicted in a variety of documentary film and photography genres. The course also explores the role that documentary photography and film play in promoting rights and advocating for social change, particularly in the realm of human rights and global inequality. It examines the history of documentary film and photography in relationship to politics, and to the development of concerns across the social sciences with inequality and social justice. It also looks at how individual documentarians, non-profit organizations and social movements use film and photography to further their goals and causes, and issues of representation their choices raise.The course is also unique because it requires students to engage in the process of visual documentation themselves by incorporating an activity-based learning component. For their final project, students choose a human rights or social problem that concerns or interests them (and which they can document locally ? no travel is required), prepare a documentary "exhibit" on the chosen topic (10-12 photographs), and write a 12-15 page paper analyzing how 2-3 social scientists construct and frame the given problem. Students also have the option to produce a short documentary film.
 
IIPS 33905 / CSC 33997 / CST 33997 / PSY 33691 / AMST 30812 / HESB 30302 / CSC 63997 (CBL)
Rethinking Crime and Justice
Susan Sharpe, Jay Brandenberger
Credit: 3
What are the causes and costs of criminal behavior? How are people and communities affected by incarceration? How can we make our criminal justice system as good as it can be for all stakeholders? This course brings together students from both sides of the prison wall to explore issues including why people commit crime, what prisons are for, realities of prison life and reentry, effects of victimization, and restorative justice perspectives. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Together they examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of criminal justice policy, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities.
 
IIPS 43503 / PSY 43242 / STV 43242 / GSC 43527 / ESS 43250 (CBL/EL)
Morality, Parenting and Nature Connection in the Anthropocene
Darcia Narvaez
Credit: 3
The course explores the cognitive and emotional aspects of moral mindsets, how they are fostered by families and cultures, what their effects are on people and planet. We develop our ecological mindset and nature connection so that we can live sustainably as members of the bio community. We examine basic needs and what is needed to prepare ourselves and others for recovering optimal human nature and planetary health in this Anthropocene age.

 

 

 

NON MAIN-CAMPUS COURSES

* INDICATES NON MAIN-CAMPUS COURSES *
 
*AL 24107 / HIST 34502 / LLRO 36000
Rome, Italy (Undergrad - JCU)
All Roads Lead to Rome
Daria Borghese, Chiara Sbordoni
Credit Hours: 3
Is it possible to understand the immense phenomenon of Rome in a semester of site visits, historical studies, literary readings, film viewings and lectures? Of course not. Nevertheless, students in this course will start to understand Rome by experiencing the complexity of its urban network; by studying the ruins of antiquity and the splendors of Renaissance, Baroque and 18th Century Rome; by tracing the epic adventure that reunited Italy and led to the establishment of Rome as its capital after twenty centuries (so that today, Rome is at the heart of two states: the Italian Republic and of Vatican); by revisiting the tragedies of modern times, including fascism and the civil war; and by learning about the Rome of postwar and contemporary Italy.
 
*AL 34002 / ESS 34360
Toledo, Spain
Toledo Internship
TBA
Credit Hours: 3
This course must be pre-approved by a Notre Dame department for specific departmental credit within a major.
 
*AL 34721
Puebla, Mexico
Medical Internship
TBA
Credit Hours: 3
Lectures by Mexican doctors on healthcare in Mexico, traditional medicine, physician perspectives, expectations of patients. Students spend six hours/week in Mexican hospitals, shadowing doctors and doing some clinical work under medical supervision. They take a trip to the indigenous town of Cuetzalan where they meet a traditional healer and witness first hand practices of traditional medicine.
 
*ANTH 34320 / HIST 34430 / IRST 24208 / SOC 34123
Dublin, Ireland
Introduction to Ireland
Kevin Whelan
Credit Hours: 3
ND Keough Ctr Course: Prof. Kevin Whelan. Evolution of Irish culture from the eighteenth century to the contemporary period; It aims to give students a foundational understanding of the cultural inheritance of the island. While organized in broadly chronological terms, it will also examine crucial thematic concerns -- landscape, history, languages, economy, society, politics and government, literature, music, sport.
 
*ANTH 34733 / THEO 34202
Santiago, Chile (Undergrad) Poverty and Development
Poverty and Development
TBA
Credit Hours: 3
Seminar format: Study of meaning and significance of poverty in Latin America, from theological and social science perspective. Mandatory 2 credit fieldwork component
 
*CSC 34604 / THEO 34605
London, England
Catholic Social Teaching
James Ashley, Gemma Bencini, Nicholas Brill, Judy Hutchinson, Kendal Jones, Alice Tyrell
Credit Hours: 3
This semester long internship in Catholic social teaching comprises two parts: (1) practical work experience in campaigning for social justice through a network of inner-city Catholic parishes in London (2) six one-on-one tutorials providing an introduction to the social teaching of the Catholic Church. The practical work experience of this internship is arranged through London Citizens, a charitable organization working mostly through Catholic parishes in London devoted to building community in London's poorest neighbourhoods. It's goals is to bring people into a mutually beneficial working relationship to pursue the common good. It seeks to identify problems in neighbourhoods and then offers the appropriate training to develop leadership skills at the grass-roots level to promote change. Each intern will be placed in a Catholic parish and given the task of helping the parish priest to develop a leadership team in a parish which campaigns for issues of social justice. Last semester, for example, students are working to promote the "living wage" campaign, which will be holding a rally at Westminster Cathedral on 1 May 2006. This practical work experience is supplemented by a series of academic tutorials in which students will read primary and secondary material on Catholic social teachings. These tutorials provide the intellectual framework for the internship. The main themes to be explored in this internship are: (i) Catholic faith and public life - What implications does the Catholic faith have for ordering of public life as well as private piety? Does community organizing provide an appropriate expression of this for Catholic congregations?(ii) Public reasoning in a pluralist society - ONe response to pluralism is to seek to eliminate religious language from public reasoning. We shall evaluate community organising as an alternative approach (iii) Conflict and reconciliation - The New Testaments presents Christ both as brining "not peace but a sword" and as the one who reconciles us to God and neighbour. Does community organizing approach conflict and reconciliation in a way which is consonant with Christianity? (iv) Power - Community organizing involves a distinctive analysis of, and attitude to, power. Is it consonant with Catholic social teaching? (v) Nation states and global justice - common humanity, and the body of Christ? We shall explore these issues in the life of London Citizens' campaigns on migrants' rights. (vi) Equality-We shall discuss the contribution of community building to the internal life of member congregations, in particular, in increasing the participation of community building to the internal life of member congregations, in particular, in increasing the participation and power of marginalized groups.
 
*ESS 34355 / SOC 44520 / THEO 34711 (EL)
Catholic Education Common Good
Simon Uttley, John Lydon, Gemme Bencini, Kendal Jones, Alice Tyrell
Credit Hours: 3
This course will integrate the experience of teaching in London Catholic schools with a reflection on practice informed by contemporary scholarship. Students who are successful in applying for placements with Catholic secondary schools in London will spend 10-15 hours per week on-site in their school, working with staff and students in a variety of ways. They will also meet weekly, as a class, to discuss their experiences and to explore the broader context of their experiences. Beginning with an introduction to the English Catholic school, its history and relationship with the State, the course will include: the Catholic school and the common good; teaching and learning in the UK tradition; controversy in the face of religious pluralism, secularisation and the question of the separation of Church and State; Catholic school ethos; spiritual capital and leadership of the Catholic school.
 
*HESB 34092
Washington DC
Foundations of Public Policy-PPV
Thomas Kellenberg
Credit Hours: 3
Public Policy visits. This course is taken in conjunction with HESB 34091 "Foundations Of Public Policy."
 
*HESB 34093
Washington DC Internship
Thomas Kellenberg
Credit Hours: 3
While in Washington, all students participate in experiential education through an internship. Internships are selected and secured by the students, with the assistance of the ND campus director of the Washington Program and the ND Career Center.
 
*LAW 74731
London (Law-JD)
Internship
Michael K Addo, Nicholas Brill, Kendal Jones, Alice Tyrell
Credit Hours: V
Students may work for employers in exchange for academic credit. The intern must work a total of sixty hours to receive one credit or one-hundred twenty hours to receive two credits. Maximum credits per year: 2.
 
*MSBA 70950
Chicago Graduate Business
Analytics Capstone Project
Michael Chapple, Scott Nestler
Credit Hours: 3
This course is the capstone for the program and provides an intensive integrative experience while students work with one or more industry partners. Students will be presented with a real business problem and access to relevant data, and will need to develop a thorough understanding of the problem and the associated data, then develop and execute a project work plan that analyzes the data available, develops actionable recommendations, and provides insight into the basis for those recommendations. Skills developed include the ability to provide effective communication of analytics results, and an understanding of key aspects of analytics solution deployment.
 
*PS 34002 (EL)
Poverty Studies Internship
Connie Mick, Gemma Bencini, Nicholas Brill, Judy Hutchinson, Kendal Jones, Alice Tyrell
Credit Hours: 3
This course is intended for students electing to fulfill the PSIM experiential learning requirement through internships while studying abroad (Option B). Students must complete 3 credits of experiential learning total, but may do so in one, two, or three separate internships with corresponding credit each semester they participate in an internship, or in the following Fall semester if the internship takes place over the summer. Students will determine credit value with their internship advisor and a Poverty Studies director. For 3 credits, a student must complete 80 to 100 hours total during one semester or approximately 8 to 10 hours per week for 10 weeks, including time at the site and with the internship advisor. A 2-credit internship requires 50 to 70 total hours (or 5-7 hours for 10 weeks) and a 1-credit internship would involve 30 to 50 total hours (or 3-5 hours for 10 weeks).
 
*ROFR 34910
Angers, France
Women of the Loire Valley
Odette Menyard
Credit Hours: 3
In this course, we will be researching the role and the image of women of the Loire Valley from the early Middle Ages to the 21st century. Attention will be given to the influence and/or active participation of some major figures in politics, religion, literary production and the arts. Our chronological survey will encompass "femmes fortes", « muses et favorites » , « femmes engagées , « salonières et épistolières », « féministes avant la lettre », and two contemporaries. A special place will be reserved for Jeanne d'Arc, viewed as a patriotic warrior, sorcerer, saint, laic saint and current emblem of the far-right political party in France. We will observe artistic representations of these figures (painting, sculpture, music, film), and read a selection of texts by them, or about them. While analyzing their achievements and failures, and the judgment of their peers and History, we will attempt to find a common denominator to answer the question: how did the expectations of and from the women evolve through the centuries? Some film screenings and on-site visits will be required. Assiduous preparation for class and active participation in discussions are expected. Requirements: one oral presentation, a 6-7 page research paper, a final examination. May replace Survey I or Survey II for French minors. Serves as an elective for French majors.
 
*SOC 24400
Spain and Immigrants
TBA
Credit Hours: 3
In this course, students will participate in several Toledo institutions related to the immigration phenomenon in Spain, collaborating directly either with the immigrant population or with the Spaniards who are working with them (each student's profile and availability will determine that student's placement). This ongoing exchange and collaboration will continue in the classroom, since the language and culture contents will be built by the students and teacher from readings, work experience, and constant debate. At the end of the course, a workshop day will be held to which collaborating institutions, students, and anyone from Toledo who wants to participate will be invited.


























 
 
 
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April 2021

30
Application Deadline | McNeill Leadership Fellows Program
Friday, April 30, 2021 - 12:00am to 11:45pm

May 2021

07
Labor Café | The Paid Leave Priority
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June 2021

July 2021

23
Just Wage Forum 2021 | Series Conclusion (Virtual)
Friday, July 23, 2021 - 1:00pm to 2:30pm

September 2021