Fall 2018 Community Engagement Course Guide

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT COURSE OPPORTUNITIES

The Center for Social Concerns offers the following kinds of community-based courses:

Experiential Learning (EL) classes put students in direct contact with some aspect of the issues being studied in their coursework. The off-campus area offers sites for learning, but students don't necessarily engage in service.

Community-Based Learning (CBL) courses give students the opportunity to contribute to the community beyond the campus. Their experiences are integrated into class like a reading assignment, providing them with an additional text for consideration during class discussions and in written assignments.

Community-Based Research (CBR) involves students in an investigation of a question of concern to a non-profit community organization. The results of the study are intended to assist the organization.

FALL 2018 COURSE INDEX

Click on department name to view departmental course listings and descriptions.

 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS

AFRICANA STUDIES

AFST 20703 (CBL) Intro to Social Problems

AFST 33706 (CBL) Rhetorics of Gender and Poverty

AFST 43575 (CBR) Race & Ethnicity in U.S.

AFST 43783 The African Diaspora: Literacies, Literatures, and Liberation

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 30812 (CBL) Rethinking Crime and Justice

AMST 40402 (CBR/CBL) Mexican Immigration

AMST 41402 (CBL) Service Mexican Immigration

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 20323 (sec. 1, & sec. 2) (CBL/EL) The World In Rome

ANTH 30115 (CBL) Immigrant America

ANTH 40200 (CBL/CBR) Visualizing Global Change

ANTH 41103 (CBL) Service in Mexican Immigration

ANTH 43204 (EL)  Visual Anthropology

ANTH 43305 (CBR/CBL) Mexican Immigration

ART, ART HISTORY, AND DESIGN

DESN 40100  (CBL, EL) VCD 8: Social Design

CONSTITUTIONAL STUDIES MINORS

CNST 30405 (CBL/CBR) Early Childhood Ed Policy

ENGLISH

ENGL 20023 (CBL) Writing Center Theory and Practice

ENGL 20171 (CBL) Rhetorics of Gender and Poverty

ENGL 40880 & 90880 The African Diaspora: Literacies, Literatures, and Liberation

FIRST YEAR OF STUDIES PROGRAM

FYS 13992 (CBL) Ethical Leadership

GENDER STUDIES

GSC 33656 (CBL) Rhetorics of Gender and Poverty

GSC 35000 (CBL) Internship

GSC 41103 (CBL) Service in Mexican Immigration

GSC 43103 (CBR/CBL) Mexican Immigration:

GLOBAL HEALTH

GH 60595 (CBL) International Development in Practice

GH 68550 (CBL/CBR) Capstone Seminar

MUSIC

MUS 20691 (EL) Wind and Percussion Pedagogy

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 43308 (CBL/CBR) Environmental Justice

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 35901 (CBL/CBR) Internship

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 23271 (CBL) Autism Spectrum Practicum I

PSY 33643 (CBL) CBL: Literacy Development and Children

PSY 33685 (CBL) Social Factors & Sustainability

PSY 33691 (CBL) Rethinking Crime and Justice

PSY 43271 (CBL) Autism Spectrum Disorder IW

PSY 43288 (CBL) Practicum: Child Maltreatment

PSY 61383 (CBL) Adult Assessment Practicum I

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

LLRO 30883 (CBR/CBL) Mexican Immigration

LLRO 31883 (CBL) Service in Mexican Immigration

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

ROSP 20201 (sec. 1 - sec. 11) (CBL/EL) Intermediate Spanish I

ROSP 20202 (sec. 1 - sec. 6) (CBL/EL) Intermediate Spanish II

ROSP 20450 (EL) Spanish for Business

ROSP 20810 (CBL) CBL: Language, Culture, and Community

ROSP 30051 (CBL) CBL: Once Upon a Time

ROSP 30320 (sec. 1 & sec. 2)  (EL) Advanced Grammar and Writing

ROSP 40876 (CBL)  Race & Ethnicity in the U.S.

RUSSIAN

RU 40101 (EL) Advanced Russian I

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 20033 (CBL) Intro to Social Problems

SOC 30145 (CBL) Immigrant America

SOC 33458 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminars: Border Immersion

SOC 40200 (CBL/CBR) Visualizing Global Change

SOC 45000 (CBL) Sociology Internship

THEOLOGY

THEO 20625 (CBL) Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice

THEO 20643 (CBL) The Askesis of Nonviolence

THEO 30047 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Hands of St. Andre

THEO 30350 (sec. 1 & sec. 3) (CBL) Sustainability at Notre Dame

THEO 33858 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: International Issues

THEO 33933 (CBL) Summer Service Learning (CCLP) (Chicago)

THEO 33936 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins

THEO 33938 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar, International Issues

THEO 33950 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

THEO 33952 (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Social Change

THEO 33961 (EL) Discernment

THEO 33962 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Gospel of Life

THEO 33965(CBL)  Social Concerns: Organizing Power & Hope

THEO 33975 (CBL) Poverty and Development in Chile

THEO 40632 (CBL/EL) Heart’s Desire and Social Change

WRITING AND RHETORIC

WR 13200 (sec, 1- sec. 8) (CBL) Community Writing and Rhetoric

 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

AEROSPACE & MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

AME 30362 (CBL) Design Methodology

CIVIL ENGINEERING

CE 35620 (CBL/EL) Engineering Design Projects

CE 40701 (EL) Principles of Practice

COLLEGE SEMINAR

CSEM 23101 (CBL/CBR)  (sec. 3 & sec. 4) Common Good Defining Community

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

CSE 20600 (sec. 2, sec. 3, sec. 4, & sec. 28)  (CBL/CBR) CSE Service Projects

CSE 30246 (EL) Database Concepts

CSE 40586 (CBL/CBR) Low Vision Mentorship Project in Computer Science Education

CSE 40600 (sec. 4 & sec. 28) (CBL/CBR) CSE Service Projects  ​

 

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

BIOS 40202 (EL/CBL) (sec. 1 & sec. 2) (CBR) Developmental Neuroscience

BIOS 50544 (CBL/CBR) Environmental Justice

CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY

CHEM 30331 (CBL/CBR) Chemistry in Service of the Community

SCIENCE PREPROFESSIONAL

SCPP 46397 (CBL/CBR) Directed Readings

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND VALUES

STV 20603 (CBL/CBR) Visualizing Global Change

STV 43396 (CBL/CBR) Environmental Justice

 

LAW SCHOOL

LAW 

LAW 70365 (EL) Federal Criminal Practice

LAW 70720 (CBL) Corporate Counsel Externship - Instruction

LAW 70726 (CBL) Applied Mediation

LAW 70728 (CBL) Applied Mediation II

LAW 70730 (CBL) Immigration Externship - Instruction

LAW 70733 (CBL) Public Defender Externship - Instruction

LAW 70736 (CBL) Lawyering Practice Instruction

LAW 70908 (CBL) Intercollegiate Athletic Externship - Instruction

LAW 75605 (CBL) Tax Clinic

LAW 75606 (CBL) Tax Clinic II

LAW 75720 (CBL) Corporate Counsel Externship - Fieldwork

LAW 75721 ( Sec. 1 & sec/ 2)  (CBL) Economic Justice Clinic I

LAW 75724 (CBL) Intellectual Property and the Entrepreneurial Law Clinic

LAW 75728 (CBL) Intellectual Property and the Entrepreneurial Law Clinic II

LAW 75731 (CBL) Legal Externship - Summer

LAW 75732 (CBL) Street Law (Co-Curricular)

LAW 75733 (CBL) Public Defender Externship

LAW 75734 (CBL/EL) Immigration Externship

LAW 75735 (CBL) Legal Externship Public Defender (Co-Curricular)

LAW 75736 (CBL/EL) Lawyering Externship Fieldwork

LAW 75737 (CBL/EL) Seventh Circuit Practice Externship Fieldwork

LAW 75760 (CBL) ND Law in Chicago Field Placement Externship

LAW 75800 (CBL/EL) Appalachia Externship

LAW 75908 (CBL/EL) Intercollegiate Athletics Externship

 

MENDOZA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

ACCOUNTANCY

ACCT 40790 (CBL) Accounting and Reporting for Not-for-Profit Organizations

ACCT 76791 (CBL) Accounting and Reporting for Not-for-Profit Organizations

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION-SC

BASC 20200 (sec. 1 -  sec. 5) (EL) Principles of Management

BASC 20250 (sec. 7,9, 10)  (EL) Principles of Marketing

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, ANALYTICS, AND OPERATIONS

ITAO 40660 (sec. 1 &  sec. 2)  (EL) IT Project Management

MANAGEMENT

MGTO 20100 (sec. 1 - sec. 5)  (EL)  Principles of Management

MGTO 30510 ( sec. 1 & sec. 2) (CBL) Social Entrepreneurship

MGTO 70550 (CBL) Social Innovation

MARKETING

MARK 20100 (sec. 7, 8, 9)  & sec. 9) (EL) Principles of Marketing

MARK 30120 (CBR) Marketing Research

 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

ARCHITECTURE

ARCH 40312 (CBL) Social Factors & Sustainability

ARCH 41111 (sec. 2, 3 ,4) (CBL) Design V

ARCH 81151 (EL) Urban Design II

 

CENTERS AND INSTITUTES

CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS

CSC 33000 (CBL/CBR)  Social Change Fellows

CSC 33301 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Sports & Social Concerns

CSC 33458 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Mexico-U.S. Border Immersion Seminar

CSC 33858 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: International Issues

CSC 33933 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Internship: Cross-Cultural Learning Program (Chicago)

CSC 33936 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins

CSC 33938 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues: International

CSC 33950 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

CSC 33952 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Topics in Social Change

CSC 33961 (EL) Discernment

CSC 33962 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Gospel of Life

CSC 33965 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing Power & Hope

CSC 33975 (CBL) Poverty & Development in Chile

CSC 33977 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Hands of St. Andre

CSC 33985 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Energy, Climate, and Social Change

CSC 33990 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Winter Service Learning

CSC 33991 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Recovering from Mental Illness through Work & Community

CSC 33997 (CBL) Rethinking Crime and Justice

CSC 36991 (sec. 1,-sec. 4) (CBL/CBR/EL) Directed Readings

CSC 36992 (CBL/CBR/EL) Directed Readings - SSLP

CSC 60696 (CBL/EL) Common Good Initiative Jerusalem

CSC 63950 (CBL/CBR/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

CSC 63953 (EL) Civic Engagement & Social Responsibility

CSC 63955 (CBL) Globalizing Perley

CENTER FOR STUDY OF LANGUAGE AND CULTURES

CSLC 63000 (CBL) Globalizing Perley

INSTITUTE FOR LATINO STUDIES

ILS 20913 (CBL) CBL: Once Upon a Time

ILS 25911 (CBL) CBL: Language, Culture and Community

ILS 33701 (CBL/EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Border Immersion

ILS 33800 (CBL) CCLP (Chicago)

ILS 40910 (CBL)  Race & Ethnicity in US

ILS 41103 (CBL) Service in Mexican Immigration

ILS 43103 (CBR/CBL) Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study

INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACE STUDIES

IIPS 20101 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Introduction to Peace Studies

IIPS 20729 (CBL) The Askesis of Nonviolence

IIPS 30304 (CBL/CBR) Visualizing Global Change

IIPS 30924 (CBL) Social Entrepreneurship

IIPS 33905 (CBL) Rethinking Crime and Justice

 

SUPPLEMENTARY MAJORS, MINORS, AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TRADITION

CST 20625 (CBL) Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice

CST 20463 The Askesis of Nonviolence

CST 23470 (CBL) Sustainability at Notre Dame

CST 30505 (CBL) Social Entrepreneurship

CST 33458 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Border Immersion

CST  33965 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing Power & Hope

CST 33997 (CBL) Rethinking Crime and Justice

EDUCATION

EDU 75630 (CBL) Internship & Practice I

EDU 75632 (CBR) Inquiry & Intervention I

EDUCATION, SCHOOLING, AND SOCIETY

ESS 20203 (CBL)  Intro to Social Problems

ESS 30401 (CBL) Writing Center Theory & Practice

ESS 30611 (CBL) Tutoring in the Community

ESS 30629 (CBR) Early Childhood Policy in the U.S.

ESS 30670 (CBL) CBL Once Upon a Time

ESS 33627 (CBL) CBL: Literacy Development & Children

ESS 33633 (CBL) CBL: Literacy at the Library

ESS 40531  (CBL) Intro to Catechesis

ESS 43640 (sec. 1- sec. 3)  (CBR) Seminar Educational Research

ESS 45652 (CBR/CBL) Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study

ESS 45653 (CBL) Service in Mexican Immigration

HESBURGH PROGRAM IN PUBLIC SERVICE

HESB 20220 (CBL) Intro to Social Problems

HESB 30302 (CBL) Rethinking Crime and Justice

HESB 30303 (CBL) Social Entrepreneurship

HESB 30595 (CBL) Early Childhood Policy in the U.S.

HESB 34092 (CBL) Foundations of Public Policy - Public Policy Visits

HESB 34093 (CBL) Washington DC Internship

HESB 40108 (CBR/CBL) Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study

HESB 40110 (CBL) Service in Mexican Immigration

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

IDS 30513 (CBL) International Development in Practice

IDS 40900 (CBL/CBR) VCD 8: Social Design

POVERTY STUDIES

PS 33400 (CBL) Rhetorics in Gender and Poverty

PS 35002 (CBR/EL) Experiential Learning-Internship

PS 43000 (CBR) Capstone Seminar

SUSTAINABILITY

SUS 20350 (CBL) Sustainability at Notre Dame

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS

AFRICANA STUDIES

AFST 20703 (CBL) / SOC 20033 (CBL) / HESB 20220 (CBL) / ESS 20203 (CBL)
Intro to Social Problems
Williams, Richard
Credit Hours: 3

Analysis of selected problems in American society such as crime, narcotic addiction, alcoholism, delinquency, racial and ethnic conflict, prostitution, and others. Discussions, debates, films, tapes, and readings.

AFST 33706 (CBL) / PS 33400 (CBL) / ENGL 20171 (CBL) / GSC 33656 (CBL) / HESB 33103 (CBL)
Rhetorics of Gender and Poverty
Mick, Connie
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the rhetorical history and dynamics of what has been called the feminization of poverty, comparing statistics and stories in scholarly and popular media that often tell conflicting narratives of who is poor and why. We will ask how the picture of poverty has evolved over time exploring such representations as: Dorothea Lange's 1936 documentary photograph of the Migrant Mother, Ronald Reagan's 1976 caricature of the Welfare Queen, the 2008 film Slumdog Millionaire, and Katherine Boo's 2012 book Behind the Beautiful Forevers. What does poverty look like in modern media (news, books, films, theatre, etc.)? Who gets to tell that story? How can we contribute to that conversation? To what extent do these representations not only reflect but shape public opinion and public policy? These questions will be grounded in theories and research on the intersection of gender, poverty, race, and rhetoric. They will also be framed by students' original community-based research supported by local community partners whose social service addresses gender and poverty. Community engagement time is limited and flexible. Final projects may be composed as traditional research or creative works.
 
AFST 43575 / ROSP 40876 / ILS 40910
Race & Ethnicity in U.S.
Moreno, Marisel
Credit Hours: 4
If something has become clear following the recent termination of Mexican-American studies courses by the Tucson Unified School District (AZ) is that race and ethnicity matter when considering the condition of Latinos/as in the US. In this course students will begin by examining the events related to the AZ law and will explore how these issues are played out in Latino literature and our local Latino community. Literature by Afro-Latina/o, Andean-Latina/o (and other Latinos of indigenous descent), and Asian-Latina/o authors will provide a lens through which to explore the racial and ethnic complexities that are erased by the umbrella term "Latino." Tutoring/mentoring at La Casa de Amistad will provide an opportunity for students to see the issues studied at work in the "real world," while also fostering stronger ties between Notre Dame and the South Bend community. For the Community-Based Learning segment of the course, students will spend two hours per week volunteering and will participate in a local immersion weekend. This course will be conducted in Spanish. Spanish heritage speakers are welcome.
 
AFST 43783 / ENGL 40880 & 90880 / ESS 43561
The African Diaspora: Literacies, Literatures, and Liberation
Morrell, Ernest
Credit Hours: 3
For much of the past 500 years official, sanctioned literacies have been systematically denied to African Descendants in the Americas. How were these restrictions resisted and subverted? How did African Diaspora populations acquire literacy as an act of resistance? How were unsanctioned literacies developed and proliferated? How have counter-literacies and literatures served as a vibrant cultural practice over the past five centuries? Particularly how do African Diaspora literacies work within and against the sanctioned literacy practices of the former British Empire? Students in this class will examine public laws, literacy narratives, and various historic and contemporary cultural productions such as novels, plays, poems, sermons, reggae, calypso, and hip-hop lyrics, advertisements and film as they develop understandings of the complex relationships African Descendants have had with dominant literacies in the Americas as well as the untold ways that African Diaspora language and literacy practices have shaped official discourse. Finally, students in the class will examine the pedagogy and the possibility of literacy movements inside and outside of schools across the African Diaspora. 

 

 

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 30812 (CBL) / CSC 33997 (CBL) / CST 33997 (CBL) / PSY 33691 (CBL) / IIPS 33905 (CBL) / HESB 30302 (CBL)
Rethinking Crime and Justice
Sharpe, Susan; Brandenberger, Jay; Kelly, Edward
Credit Hours: 3
What are the causes and costs of criminal behavior? How are people and communities affected by incarceration? How can we make our criminal justice system as good as it can be for all stakeholders? This course brings together students from both sides of the prison wall to explore issues including why people commit crime, what prisons are for, realities of prison life and reentry, effects of victimization, and restorative justice perspectives. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Together they examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of criminal justice policy, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities.
 
AMST 40402 (CBR/CBL) / ILS 43103 (CBR/CBL) / ESS 45652 (CBR/CBL) / ANTH 43305 (CBR/CBL) / GSC 43103 (CBR/CBL) / HESB 40108 (CBR/CBL) / LLRO 30883 (CBR/CBL) / IDS 43270 43270 (CBR/CBL)
Mexican Immigration
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.
 
AMST 41402 (CBL) / ILS 41103 (CBL) / HESB 40110 (CBL) / ESS 45653 (CBL) / GSC 41103 (CBL) / LLRO 31883 (CBL) / ANTH 41103 (CBL)
Service Mexican Immigration
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 1
This one-credit course complements the classroom course, Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case study for students who wish to extend their learning through service in the community. (Enrollment in the classroom course is a requirement, but students in the classroom course are not required to add this course.) Students will volunteer as tutors, interpreters, translators, assistants and teachers at local organizations, clinics, law offices and community agencies. The schedules for service will vary accordingly.

 

 

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 20323 (sec. 1, & sec. 2) / ANTH 60323 / KSGA 20800 / ASIA 20323 / IIPS 20504 / IDS 20100 / LLRO 20690 / ROIT 20690
The World In Rome
Albahari, Maurizio
Credit Hours: 3
How and why do some of the roads taken by migrants (including refugees) lead to Rome and Italy? What are the challenges faced by migrants upon their arrival, and on their path to citizenship? How does civil society intervene to mitigate those challenges, and to facilitate mutual integration and engagement? What are the distinctive features of Roman lay and Catholic approaches to migration? The course addresses such questions, building on contemporary Rome both as a compelling case study and as a gateway to the causes, lived experiences, and consequences of global migrations. Migrants' reception and integration happens at the local level, and in interaction with residents and existing communities. Attention to the realities of the host civil society is therefore fundamental: migration is not an issue that can simply be delegated to experts, bureaucrats, and politicians. Students investigate how the experience of the city is at the same time the experience of globalization, embodied in older and new residents' everyday life in the built environment; and they appreciate situated social engagement and its potentialities.
 
ANTH 30115 (CBL) / AMST 30145 (CBL) / ILS 30145 (CBL) / SOC 30145 (CBL)
Immigrant America
Huynh, Jennifer
Credit Hours: 3
This course offers a critical examination of what it means to be an immigrant or child of immigrants through scholarly works, memoirs, blogs, and popular journalism. Since the liberalization of immigration policy in 1965, immigrants from Latin America and Asia are becoming an increasing and emergent demographic of American society. In major American cities such as Los Angeles and New York, they comprise over 50% of the population. This course focuses on how immigrants and the children of immigrants experience the United States. How are immigrants changing the US racial and ethnic structure? How do their experiences differ given varying legal statuses? How is the second generation becoming American? We will explore these questions through readings that focus on family, religion, education, dating and sexuality. This course will include a community based learning component where students will work with immigrant serving organizations. Students will have the option to teach citizenship classes or to work with immigrant children. Service will be 2-3 hours per week outside of class. 
 
 

ANTH 40200 (CBL/CBR) / STV 20603 (CBL/CBR) / KSGA 40200 (CBL/CBR) / MGA 40806 (CBL/CBR) / IIPS 30304 (CBL/CBR) / IDS 40830 (CBL/CBR) / SOC 40200 (CBL/CBR)
Visualizing Global Change

Kay, Tamara
Credit Hours: 3
The goal of the course is to compare the processes by which social scientists and filmmakers/photographers engage in social documentation. Students explore how global social problems such as rural and urban poverty, race and gender inequalities, immigration, and violence are analyzed across the social sciences, and depicted in a variety of documentary film and photography genres. The course also explores the role that documentary photography and film play in promoting rights and advocating for social change, particularly in the realm of human rights and global inequality. It examines the history of documentary film and photography in relationship to politics, and to the development of concerns across the social sciences with inequality and social justice. It also looks at how individual documentarians, non-profit organizations and social movements use film and photography to further their goals and causes, and issues of representation their choices raise. The course is also unique because it requires students to engage in the process of visual documentation themselves by incorporating an activity-based learning component. For their final project, students choose a human rights or social problem that concerns or interests them (and which they can document locally, no travel is required), prepare a documentary exhibit on the chosen topic (10-12 photographs), and write a 12-15 page paper analyzing how 2-3 social scientists construct and frame the given problem. Students also have the option to produce a short documentary film.
 
ANTH 41103 (CBL) / AMST 41402 (CBL) / ILS 41103 (CBL) / HESB 40110 (CBL) / ESS 45653 (CBL) / GSC 41103 (CBL) / LLRO 31883 (CBL)
Service Mexican Immigration
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 1
This one-credit course complements the classroom course, Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case study for students who wish to extend their learning through service in the community. (Enrollment in the classroom course is a requirement, but students in the classroom course are not required to add this course.) Students will volunteer as tutors, interpreters, translators, assistants and teachers at local organizations, clinics, law offices and community agencies. The schedules for service will vary accordingly.
 
ANTH 43204 / ANTH 63204 / FTT 40106
Visual Anthropology
Kuijt, Ian; Donaruma, Williams
Credit Hours: 3
Visual Anthropology provides a powerful and engaging means of sharing historical and anthropological stories. This new course is based on the assumption that people think in terms of images, movement and sound and that film can be used to create powerful and important human narratives. This class is designed to train students in how to research, design, manage and produce short documentary film projects using both state of the art production equipment and accessible forms of media capture such as iPhones and GoPros. As a graduate/undergraduate elective, this course thematically focuses on understanding and documenting the historical, social, economic and personal stories centered on 19th through 20th century Indiana local barns, and placing these in a meaningful cultural and historical context. Students will work in teams of two to research an assigned farmstead, focusing on the barn as a material setting and documenting the past through the integration of historical research, oral history and digital video. Students will develop 2 minute videos for inclusion in a video book (as seen here https://islandplacesislandlives.com/) that touches on local history as well as a longer 8 minute video that explores the life, history and social context of the barn. The result will be a collaborative effort that creates a body of work by the class exploring local history and linking Anthropology with filmmaking to tell stories. Dept Approval is required by emailing the professors before registration with a list of applicable courses taken in your major. This is designed to be an equal collaboration between Anthropology, History and Film, TV and Theatre students. Preference will be given to those with greater experience in respective areas as an advanced class.
 
ANTH 43305 (CBR/CBL) / AMST 40402 (CBR/CBL) / ILS 43103 (CBR/CBL) / ESS 45652 (CBR/CBL) / GSC 43103 (CBR/CBL) / HESB 40108 (CBR/CBL) / LLRO 30883 (CBR/CBL) / IDS 43270 43270 (CBR/CBL)
Mexican Immigration
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.

 

 

 

ART, ART HISTORY, AND DESIGN

DESN 40100  (CBL/EL) / IDS 40900 (CBL/EL)
VCD 8: Social Design
Verma, Neeta
Credit Hours: 3
VCD1 (DESN 20101) is recommended, but not required MATERIALS FEE. This advanced course in visual communication illustrates how design can make a demonstrable difference by informing and educating the public. Class projects focus on design's ability to affect positive social change. The class also benefits students who intend to pursue the field of graphic design after graduation, preparing them both creatively and technically for professional practice by focusing on research-based assignments. These projects will allow students to address various issues affecting contemporary society while simultaneously building their portfolio.

 

 

 

CONSTITUTIONAL STUDIES MINORS

CNST 30405 (CBR) / ESS 30629 (CBR) / HESB 30405 (CBR)
Early Childhood Ed Policy
Fulcher-Dawson, Rachel
Credit Hours: 3
This course covers the various issues relevant to the current early childhood education landscape. This includes theories of early learning and child development, policy development in the United States, the issues of inequality and the achievement gap (particularly related to K-12 Education Reform) and research on interventions or "what works" in early childhood programming. The advantage to understanding the theories of child development, the policy context and the intervention research is that it gives future teachers and future policymakers a foundational premise upon which to grow, analyze, learn and teach. Topics covered will include: Theories of Child Development (Infant Schools to Present), Head Start and the CCDBG, State Preschool, Inequality and the Achievement Gap in the Early Years and Interventions in Early Childhood (HighScope/Perry Preschool, Abecedarian and Chicago Parent Studies, Head Start Research). The goal of this class is to come away with a greater understanding of the language, the history, the goals and the possibilities in this policy area as well as its connections to other social welfare programs and to K-12 schooling. Students will become more fluent in the language of early childhood education and will gain the foundational knowledge of past and current theories, laws, policies and educational interventions.

 

 

 

ENGLISH

ENGL 20023 (CBL) / ESS 30401 (CBL)
Writing Center Theory and Practice
Capdevielle, Matthew
Credit Hours: 3
A three-credit course in writing pedagogy for students working as tutors in the University Writing Center.
 
ENGL 20171 (CBL) / AFST 33706 (CBL) / PS 33400 (CBL) / GSC 33656 (CBL) / HESB 33103 (CBL)
Rhetorics of Gender and Poverty
Mick, Connie
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the rhetorical history and dynamics of what has been called the feminization of poverty, comparing statistics and stories in scholarly and popular media that often tell conflicting narratives of who is poor and why. We will ask how the picture of poverty has evolved over time exploring such representations as: Dorothea Lange's 1936 documentary photograph of the Migrant Mother, Ronald Reagan's 1976 caricature of the Welfare Queen, the 2008 film Slumdog Millionaire, and Katherine Boo's 2012 book Behind the Beautiful Forevers. What does poverty look like in modern media (news, books, films, theatre, etc.)? Who gets to tell that story? How can we contribute to that conversation? To what extent do these representations not only reflect but shape public opinion and public policy? These questions will be grounded in theories and research on the intersection of gender, poverty, race, and rhetoric. They will also be framed by students' original community-based research supported by local community partners whose social service addresses gender and poverty. Community engagement time is limited and flexible. Final projects may be composed as traditional research or creative works.
 

ENGL 40880 & 90880 / ESS 43561 / AFST 43783
The African Diaspora: Literacies, Literatures, and Liberation

Morrell, Ernest
Credit Hours: 3
For much of the past 500 years official, sanctioned literacies have been systematically denied to African Descendants in the Americas. How were these restrictions resisted and subverted? How did African Diaspora populations acquire literacy as an act of resistance? How were unsanctioned literacies developed and proliferated? How have counter-literacies and literatures served as a vibrant cultural practice over the past five centuries? Particularly how do African Diaspora literacies work within and against the sanctioned literacy practices of the former British Empire? Students in this class will examine public laws, literacy narratives, and various historic and contemporary cultural productions such as novels, plays, poems, sermons, reggae, calypso, and hip-hop lyrics, advertisements and film as they develop understandings of the complex relationships African Descendants have had with dominant literacies in the Americas as well as the untold ways that African Diaspora language and literacy practices have shaped official discourse. Finally, students in the class will examine the pedagogy and the possibility of literacy movements inside and outside of schools across the African Diaspora. 

 

FIRST YEAR OF STUDIES PROGRAM

FYS 13992 (CBL)
Ethical Leadership
Botting, Eileen
Credit Hours: 0-1
This year-long required course for first-year merit scholars is a lecture and discussion series on the meaning of ethical leadership and the intellectual relationship between interdisciplinary scholarship and effective public service. Scholars develop critical thinking and public speaking skills as they reflect on some of the most pressing problems and challenges of our time. The specific topics chosen for discussion - civic engagement and renewal, wealth disparity, racism, incarceration, gender inequality, environmental degradation, children's rights, etc. - often have a local as well as a global dimension. Scholars are assigned selected readings in advance of each lecture and discussion session. Scholars are also encouraged to share with their peers articles and essays that they deem especially pertinent to the lecture topic(s). Ideas and views discussed in the lecture series are meant to serve as stimuli or points of departure for the service initiatives and research projects that merit scholars typically undertake during their four years in their programs. This public lecture and discussion series featuring distinguished guest speakers from the university, senior merit scholars, the broader academy, and the local community is one of the many ways in which Notre Dame encourages its undergraduate scholars to become interdisciplinary thinkers and collaborative leaders across their diverse fields of study. Part of the course will involve "public service immersion" trips to organizations in the local community to learn about civic engagement, research, and internship opportunities. The course concludes with a self-designed final creative project, in which the scholar integrates what has been learned about leadership over the course of the semester.

 

 

 

GENDER STUDIES

GSC 33656 (CBL) / AFST 33706 (CBL) / PS 33400 (CBL) / ENGL 20171 (CBL) / HESB 33103 (CBL)
Rhetorics of Gender and Poverty
Mick, Connie
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the rhetorical history and dynamics of what has been called the feminization of poverty, comparing statistics and stories in scholarly and popular media that often tell conflicting narratives of who is poor and why. We will ask how the picture of poverty has evolved over time exploring such representations as: Dorothea Lange's 1936 documentary photograph of the Migrant Mother, Ronald Reagan's 1976 caricature of the Welfare Queen, the 2008 film Slumdog Millionaire, and Katherine Boo's 2012 book Behind the Beautiful Forevers. What does poverty look like in modern media (news, books, films, theatre, etc.)? Who gets to tell that story? How can we contribute to that conversation? To what extent do these representations not only reflect but shape public opinion and public policy? These questions will be grounded in theories and research on the intersection of gender, poverty, race, and rhetoric. They will also be framed by students' original community-based research supported by local community partners whose social service addresses gender and poverty. Community engagement time is limited and flexible. Final projects may be composed as traditional research or creative works.
 
GSC 35000 (CBL)
Internship
TBA
Credit Hours: 3
This course connects students with a community-based partner organization related to the student’s interests in career development and social justice. In collaboration with the Director of Undergraduate Studies, students choose a community partner organization for which they serve as an unpaid intern. In fall/spring semesters, students perform 6?8 hours of internship service per week for their chosen internship site, completing a minimum of 80 total hours. During summer session, students work 5?8 weeks full time, as defined by the internship site. Work on-site is overseen by a designated agency supervisor; coursework is supervised and evaluated by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are expected to complete a short set of readings before the internship begins. Additional assignments include: weekly journal entries; a final reflection paper that summarizes the internship experience and explores its connections to the student?s Gender Studies education; an updated resume that includes the internship. This course may be taken during any of the three academic sessions in junior or senior year, and may be counted as an elective towards any Gender Studies undergraduate degree.
 
GSC 41103 (CBL) / AMST 41402 (CBL) / ILS 41103 (CBL) / HESB 40110 (CBL) / ESS 45653 (CBL) / LLRO 31883 (CBL) / ANTH 41103 (CBL)
Service Mexican Immigration
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 1
This one credit course complements the classroom course, Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case study for students who wish to extend their learning through service in the community. (Enrollment in the classroom course is a requirement, but students in the classroom course are not required to add this course.) Students will volunteer as tutors, interpreters, translators, assistants and teachers at local organizations, clinics, law offices and community agencies. The schedules for service will vary accordingly.
 
GSC 43103 (CBR/CBL) / AMST 40402 (CBR/CBL) / ILS 43103 (CBR/CBL) / ESS 45652 (CBR/CBL) / ANTH 43305 (CBR/CBL) / HESB 40108 (CBR/CBL) / LLRO 30883 (CBR/CBL) / IDS 43270 43270 (CBR/CBL)
Mexican Immigration
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.

 

 

 

GLOBAL HEALTH

GH 60595 (CBL) / IDS 30513 (CBL)
International Development in Practice
Reifenberg, Stephen
Credit Hours: 3
This course on international development has three major purposes: I) to examine diverse approaches to thinking about international development and processes that bring about individual and societal change, II) to explore the role and constraints of development projects in areas such as poverty reduction, social development, health, education, the environment, and emergency relief, and III) to develop practical skills related to project planning and management, negotiations, communications, and the evaluation of international development projects. This class aspires to develop relevant knowledge and practical skill for students interested in engaging in bringing about positive change in a complex world. The class is particularly relevant for students planning international summer service internships, studying abroad, or for those considering careers in areas related to social and economic development. The course will make use of specific case studies from Haiti, Peru, Uganda, Mexico, Bangladesh, Pakistan, and Chile, among others, drawing lessons from instructive stories of failure and inspirational stories of change.
 
GH 68550 (CBL/CBR)
Capstone Seminar
Beidinger, Heidi
Credit Hours: 2
The Capstone Seminar is required for all MS in Global Health students. The capstone courses span the entire year and are designed to support students as they prepare for and complete their Capstone Project as required in the MS in Global Health program. This semester's course lays the foundation for the Capstone Project and guides students as they develop their project focus. We will discuss program requirements and deadlines with regard to your Capstone Project, including the field research component. There is a focus on scientific writing and students will submit a project proposal to an evaluation committee at the end of the semester. Students are responsible for working with an identified faculty supervisor on their projects during the semester to advance the project and meet all deadlines.

 

 

 

MUSIC

MUS 20691 (EL)
Wind and Percussion Pedagogy
Dye, Kenneth; Merten, Matthew
Credit Hours: 1
Notre Dame students will learn teaching techniques on their instruments through hands-on instruction of local students in the Bandlink program. Instruction will be in individual lessons and small group rehearsals.

 

 

 

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 43308 (CBL/CBR) / BIOS 50544 (CBL/CBR) / STV 43396 (CBL/CBR)
Environmental Justice
Shrader-Frechette, Kristin
Credit Hours: 3
Environmental injustice (EIJ) refers to the fact that children, minorities, and poor people receive higher exposures to environmental toxins that damage their health and kill them. This course is designed to understand and to address EIJ, and it is for people interested in environmental problems and the social injustices that they cause. It will cover flaws in scientific method and in ethics that cause EIJ. Course is hands-on, practical, and dedicated to showing students how to do environment-related social-justice analysis and how to analyze environmental-impact assessments. Students choose individual projects on which to work, and these projects determine most of the course grade. These projects also are designed to help influence environmental policy or to serve the needs of specific pollution-threatened poor or minority communities. For more information, see the syllabus at www.nd.edu/~kshrader/courses/ Course Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required if student is not a philosophy, pre-med, science, math, or engineering major (via email to kshrader@nd.edu) to register for course. Course Requirements: There are weekly quizzes; but no tests and no exams, 2 short, analytic papers; participation in classroom analysis, and one student-chosen project. Students each choose an EJ project on which to work, so that they can use techniques (learned in the course) to promote real-world social justice and improved use of scientific methods in specific poor or minority communities who are victimized by pollution. There are no exams. Course Texts include Peter Singer, One World; Shrader-Frechette, Environmental Justice; and a variety of articles from scientific and medical journals.

 

 

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 35901 (CBL/CBR)
Internship
Arroyo, Carolina
Credit Hours: 1
The goal of the internship program is to provide opportunities to integrate coursework with real work experience. Internships are available throughout the Notre Dame area with a variety of government offices, non-profit agencies and NGO's. Interns work with professionals in their own area of interest, explore career options, and gain real work experience. Permission required. Does not count for the Political Science Major.

 

 

 

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 23271 (CBL)
Autism Spectrum Disorder I
Wier, Kristin
Credit Hours: 3
This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct educational programs with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) while acquiring an in-depth knowledge of the individual, family, community, and cultural issues surrounding the diagnosis. For the practicum portion of the course, students will work within a structured program in a family home, on-average two times a weeks for at least four hours (50 hours over the course of the semester). For the in-class portion of the course, students will meet with the instructors to discuss current research/readings, important topics, and personal experiences related to ASD. It is our hope that through this course you will begin to gain an understanding of individuals with ASD and acquire the skills to support them and their families. In addition, you will continue to develop the communication skills (written and oral) that are crucial to be a successful professional in the field of developmental disabilities. Please note that a version of this course is offered at the 40000 level which has a significant writing requirement (and has additional required coursework, see listing). Other requirements: Unless other arrangements are made, students need to have a car or regular access to transportation. Access to a car can be arranged through the Center for Social Concerns.
 
PSY 33643 (CBL) / ESS 33627 (CBL)
CBL: Literacy Development and Children
Christensen, Andrea
Credit Hours: 3
For students who wish to integrate theory, practice, and empirical evidence in children's learning, this course combines community-based service learning and research. Students will meet 75 minutes/week on campus to discuss readings on topics including service learning, mentoring, children's learning and development, and research methods. In addition, students will spend at least two hours/week (3-4 p.m., two weekday afternoons [M/W or T/R] for a total of approximately 25 hours) working one-on-one with an elementary school child in a local after-school literacy program. Students will keep a journal with entries for each visit with their child, and they will conduct research comparing instructional techniques, materials, or behavioral management methods. Finally, students will integrate the theory and evidence from course material with their service experience and research findings. This seminar is offered only in the fall; however, students will be encouraged to continue their service to the after-school program during the spring semester through a one-credit ESS service-learning option. *Please note: students may need to provide their own transportation to/from the after-school program site, though every effort will be made to carpool or to include sites that are within walking distance of campus.
 
PSY 33685 & 60685 / ARCH 40312 & 60312
Social Factors & Sustainability
Rollings, Kimberly
Credit Hours: 3
This course focuses on the interaction between people and the physical environment on human health, well-being, behavior, and sustainability. Social and physical factors across multiple scales - from specific environments (residential, educational, work, health care, and commercial), urban and natural settings, to the planet - are explored. Issues of public health, environmental justice, universal design, and culture are included throughout. Lecture and discussion class with hands-on assignments and quizzes. Upper level undergraduate and graduate students from across the University and especially in architecture, the sustainability minor, design, pre-professional studies, social sciences, and business are encouraged to enroll.
 
PSY 33691 (CBL) / AMST 30812 (CBL) / CSC 33997 (CBL) / CST 33997 (CBL) / IIPS 33905 (CBL) / HESB 30302 (CBL)
Rethinking Crime and Justice
Sharpe, Susan; Brandenberger, Jay; Kelly, Edward
Credit Hours: 3
What are the causes and costs of criminal behavior? How are people and communities affected by incarceration? How can we make our criminal justice system as good as it can be for all stakeholders? This course brings together students from both sides of the prison wall to explore issues including why people commit crime, what prisons are for, realities of prison life and reentry, effects of victimization, and restorative justice perspectives. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Together they examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of criminal justice policy, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities.
 
PSY 43271 (CBL)
Autism Spectrum Disorder IW
Wier, Kristin
Credit Hours: 3
This course provides students with the opportunity to conduct educational programs with individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) while acquiring an in-depth knowledge of the individual, family, community, and cultural issues surrounding the diagnosis. For the practicum portion of the course, students will work within a structured program in a family home, on-average two times a weeks for at least four hours (50 hours over the course of the semester). For the in-class portion of the course, students will meet with the instructors to discuss current research/readings, important topics, and personal experiences related to ASD. It is our hope that through this course you will begin to gain an understanding of individuals with ASD and acquire the skills to support them and their families. In addition, you will continue to develop the communication skills (written and oral) that are crucial to be a successful professional in the field of developmental disabilities. Please note that a version of this course is offered at the 40000 level which has a significant writing requirement (and has additional required coursework, see listing). Other requirements: Unless other arrangements are made, students need to have a car or regular access to transportation. Access to a car can be arranged through the Center for Social Concerns.
 
PSY 43288 (CBL)
Practicum: Child Maltreatment
Valentino, Kristin
Credit Hours: 3
This course is intended to expose students to the child welfare system and the effects of child maltreatment and foster care on child development. The seminar portion of the course will include training on mandated reporting, and the child welfare system, and discussion of current research on child maltreatment, foster care, child development, and developmental psychopathology. The practicum portion of the course is designed to give students hands on experience with children in custody of the Department of Child Services in South Bend. Each student in the practicum will be paired with a child who is currently placed in foster care because of substantiated child maltreatment. The student will serve as a mentor to this child, and will spend 1-2 hours with the child twice weekly in the child's foster home.
 
PSY 61383 (CBL)
Adult Assessment Practicum I
Clark, Lee Anna
Credit Hours: 1-3
In this practicum, students will gain clinical experience providing psychological assessments for adults referred from a community mental-health center. They will learn to administer several semi-structured interviews, to interpret questionnaire scores, and to write comprehensive reports. Assessments will include taking a comprehensive psychosocial history, diagnosis of clinical symptoms and syndromes, assessment of personality and personality disorder, and psychosocial and daily functioning. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

LLRO 30883 (CBR/CBL) / AMST 40402 (CBR/CBL) / ILS 43103 (CBR/CBL) / ESS 45652 (CBR/CBL) / ANTH 43305 (CBR/CBL) / GSC 43103 (CBR/CBL) / HESB 40108 (CBR/CBL) / IDS 43270 43270 (CBR/CBL)
Mexican Immigration
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.
 
LLRO 31883 (CBL) / AMST 41402 (CBL) / ILS 41103 (CBL) / HESB 40110 (CBL) / ESS 45653 (CBL) / GSC 41103 (CBL) / ANTH 41103 (CBL)
Service Mexican Immigration
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 1
This one-credit course complements the classroom course, Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case study for students who wish to extend their learning through service in the community. (Enrollment in the classroom course is a requirement, but students in the classroom course are not required to add this course.) Students will volunteer as tutors, interpreters, translators, assistants and teachers at local organizations, clinics, law offices and community agencies. The schedules for service will vary accordingly.

 

 

 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

ROSP 20201 (sec. 1 - sec. 11) (CBL/EL)
Intermediate Spanish I
Various Professors
Credit Hours: 3
This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts. Student must have a Language Exam Score between 341 and 394 to register for this class.
 
ROSP 20202 (sec. 1 - sec. 6) (CBL/EL)
Intermediate Spanish II
Various Professors
Credit Hours: 3
This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts. Students must have a Language Exam Score between 395 and 439 to enroll in this class.
 
ROSP 20450 (EL)
Spanish for Business
Menes, Ivis
Credit Hours: 3
This course is designed for the student who wants to learn and study Spanish terminology, phrases, and cultural conventions used in business situations in Spain and Latin America.
 
ROSP 20810 (CBL) / ILS 25911 (CBL)
CBL: Language, Culture, and Community
Coloma, Maria
Credit Hours: 3
This fifth-semester language and culture course is designed for students who want to improve their communication skills in Spanish and broaden their understanding of the Hispanic world through connecting with the local Spanish speaking community. Each section may focus on different topics, such as health care, education, social services, history of immigration, and intercultural competence. The course has a required Community-Based-Learning component in which students engage with the Latino community through placements in such areas as health care, youth mentoring or tutoring programs, English as a New Language (ENL) classes, and facilitating educational workshops with parents. In this course, students integrate their service experiences with the academic components of the class through readings, research, reflective writing, and discussion.
 
ROSP 30051 (CBL) / ILS 20913 (CBL) / ESS 30670 (CBL)
CBL Once Upon a Time
Parroquin, Rachel
Credit Hours: 3
Students will be introduced to Literatura Infantil y Juvenil (LIJ) in the Spanish-speaking world through a combination of considerable reading of LIJ across genres and levels and a critical perspective of LIJ via academic text and articles. Authors will include prolific writers of LIJ like Alma Flor Ada, as well as widely known writers like Cortazar, Paz, Perez Reverte, Poniatowska, and Vargas LLosa who have also begun writing children's books. Among genres read will be folklore, narrative, fiction (contemporary, realistic, historical, multicultural), fantasy, short story, poetry, and non-fiction. Students will also learn about various LIJ book awards and their evolution over time. In addition, students will develop criteria for evaluating quality LIJ. Finally, there is a Community-Based Learning (CBL) component where students will share LIJ with the local Latino community through CBL projects and/or a reading program with Latino youth. Pre-requiste: ROSP 20202 or above or placement by exam. This course can count as an advanced elective towards the major.
 
ROSP 30320 (sec. 1 & sec. 2)  (EL)
Advanced Grammar and Writing
Coloma, Maria
Credit Hours: 3
A further refinement of Spanish speaking and writing skills, this course is designed for students returning from abroad who wish to improve their proficiency in Spanish, and for students already in upper division- courses who seek additional assistance with writing skills and grammar.
 
ROSP 40876 / AFST 43575 / ILS 40910
Race & Ethnicity in U.S.
Moreno, Marisel
Credit Hours: 4
If something has become clear following the recent termination of Mexican-American studies courses by the Tucson Unified School District (AZ) is that race and ethnicity matter when considering the condition of Latinos/as in the US. In this course students will begin by examining the events related to the AZ law and will explore how these issues are played out in Latino literature and our local Latino community. Literature by Afro-Latina/o, Andean-Latina/o (and other Latinos of indigenous descent), and Asian-Latina/o authors will provide a lens through which to explore the racial and ethnic complexities that are erased by the umbrella term "Latino." Tutoring/mentoring at La Casa de Amistad will provide an opportunity for students to see the issues studied at work in the "real world," while also fostering stronger ties between Notre Dame and the South Bend community. For the Community-Based Learning segment of the course, students will spend two hours per week volunteering and will participate in a local immersion weekend. This course will be conducted in Spanish. Spanish heritage speakers are welcome.

 

 

 

RUSSIAN

RU 40101 (EL)
Advanced Russian I
Miller, Melissa
Credit Hours: 3
This year-long course is designed to significantly improve students' comprehension and self-expression skills in Russian, serving as a preparation for Russian literature courses in the original. The course will include an intensive review of Russian grammar; Russian stylistics, syntax, and grammar at the advanced level; reading and analysis of a wide range of 19th-century Russian literary texts; writing essays in Russian; and extensive work on vocabulary building and advanced conversation skills.

 

 

 

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 20033 (CBL) / AFST 20703 (CBL) / HESB 20220 (CBL) / ESS 20203 (CBL)
Intro to Social Problems
Williams, Richard
Credit Hours: 3
Analysis of selected problems in American society such as crime, narcotic addiction, alcoholism, delinquency, racial and ethnic conflict, prostitution, and others. Discussions, debates, films, tapes, and readings.
 

SOC 30145 (CBL) / ANTH 30115 (CBL) / AMST 30145 (CBL) / ILS 30145 (CBL)
Immigrant America

Huynh, Jennifer
Credit Hours: 3
This course offers a critical examination of what it means to be an immigrant or child of immigrants through scholarly works, memoirs, blogs, and popular journalism. Since the liberalization of immigration policy in 1965, immigrants from Latin America and Asia are becoming an increasing and emergent demographic of American society. In major American cities such as Los Angeles and New York, they comprise over 50% of the population. This course focuses on how immigrants and the children of immigrants experience the United States. How are immigrants changing the US racial and ethnic structure? How do their experiences differ given varying legal statuses? How is the second generation becoming American? We will explore these questions through readings that focus on family, religion, education, dating and sexuality. This course will include a community based learning component where students will work with immigrant serving organizations. Students will have the option to teach citizenship classes or to work with immigrant children. Service will be 2-3 hours per week outside of class. 
 
 
SOC 33458 (CBL) / CST 33458 (CBL) / ILS 33701 (CBL) / CSC 33458 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminars: Border Immersion
Beyerlein, Kraig
Credit Hours: 2
This seminar and experiential-learning course is broken into two parts. In the fall (for two credits), students will participate in a seminar that will expose them to various perspectives about immigration issues, especially those related to the Mexico-U.S. border. During our in-class meetings in the fall, (approximately 1 hr. & 40 min. per week), we will discuss scholarly and journalistic accounts of why migrants leave their home countries, the struggles they face during the journey, how U.S. citizens are responding, and possible policy solutions. In the spring (for one credit), students will participate in an immersion trip to the Southern Arizona borderlands during the first week of January and in follow-up classroom meetings (approximately 50 min. per week) during the spring semester to process the immersion experience. During the immersion trip, we will observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, be trained for and participate in humanitarian efforts, tour a Border Patrol and detention facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from faith leaders about their current and past border activism, and visit Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community. Throughout the course, particular focus will be given to the intersection of religion - especially Catholic Social Teachings - and border and immigration issues. To be eligible, students must complete an application. Enrollment is competitive. The 15 available spots will be chosen based on the application responses, with preference given to those submitting earliest. Students will be notified about their status within a week of submitting the application. There are fees associated with this seminar (also see CSC website for information). This is a graded course. Department approval is required. [Note: Due to the overlap in content, students who have completed the one-credit version (CSC 33966/SOC 33066/ILS 30804/THEO 33966) cannot take this course.]

SOC 40200 (CBL/CBR) / STV 20603 (CBL/CBR) / KSGA 40200 (CBL/CBR) / MGA 40806 (CBL/CBR) / ANTH 40200 (CBL/CBR) / IIPS 30304 (CBL/CBR) / IDS 40830 (CBL/CBR)
Visualizing Global Change

Kay, Tamara
Credit Hours: 3
The goal of the course is to compare the processes by which social scientists and filmmakers/photographers engage in social documentation. Students explore how global social problems such as rural and urban poverty, race and gender inequalities, immigration, and violence are analyzed across the social sciences, and depicted in a variety of documentary film and photography genres. The course also explores the role that documentary photography and film play in promoting rights and advocating for social change, particularly in the realm of human rights and global inequality. It examines the history of documentary film and photography in relationship to politics, and to the development of concerns across the social sciences with inequality and social justice. It also looks at how individual documentarians, non-profit organizations and social movements use film and photography to further their goals and causes, and issues of representation their choices raise. The course is also unique because it requires students to engage in the process of visual documentation themselves by incorporating an activity-based learning component. For their final project, students choose a human rights or social problem that concerns or interests them (and which they can document locally, no travel is required), prepare a documentary exhibit on the chosen topic (10-12 photographs), and write a 12-15 page paper analyzing how 2-3 social scientists construct and frame the given problem. Students also have the option to produce a short documentary film.
 
SOC 45000 (CBL)
Sociology Internship
Thomas, Mim
Credit Hours: 1-3
The Sociology Internship[ is a community-based learning course designed to give students some practical experience in the area of urban affairs, social welfare, education, health care, or business, in order to test their interest, complement their academic work, or acquire work experience preparatory to future careers. Students are placed in a community agency in the South Bend area and normally work seven hours per week as interns under the supervision of an experienced practitioner. Scheduling hours is a flexible process in order to accommodate the intern's availability and the needs of the host agency. While there are no prerequisites, preference is given to Sociology majors, ALPP or SCPP majors, PSIM minors, and students who have had course work in an area related to social concerns. This is a graded course. In addition to field work, academic work includes reading scholarly works related to the field placement, periodic group meetings with the instructor and others in the course, periodic short reports, and a final paper. Departmental approval is required. The following is a list of agencies that have accepted interns. Students may also request placement in an agency they find on their own (subject to approval by the instructor). La Casa de Amistad Salvation Army of St. Joseph County (Social Services) Sex Offense Services of St. Joseph County (must complete paper work and training a semester in advance) Early Childhood Development Center Good Shepherd Montessori School Robinson Community Learning Center Upward Bound College Preparatory Program, UND AIDS Assist Center for Hospice & Palliative Care, St. Joseph County (usually requires two-semester commitment) Sr. Maura Brannick Health Center at Chapin Street The CASIE Center (Child Abuse Services, Investigation & Education) Family Justice Center Indiana Legal Services

 

 

 

THEOLOGY

THEO 20625 (CBL) / CST 20625 (CBL)
Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice
Pfeil, Margaret
Credit Hours: 3
This course is designed for students who have completed a Summer Service Project Internship (SSLP or ISSLP) or Social Enterprise Microfinance Internship (SEMI). It affords students the opportunity to re-engage their immersion experiences. Students will employ tools of social analysis, theological reflection, and rhetoric relative to both topics such as hunger, homelessness, poverty, incarceration, and immigration, and themes such as freedom, solidarity, mimesis, power, and the preferential option for the poor. The goal of the course is to develop a theology of discipleship to which justice is integral, including considerations of worship, sustainability, social reconciliation and restorative justice.
 
THEO 20643 (CBL) / IIPS 20729 (CBL) / CST 20643 (CBL)
The Askesis of Nonviolence
Pfeil, Margaret
Credit Hours: 3
This course will explore the theology and practice of nonviolence as a form of askesis, or spiritual discipline. The material will include readings from Scripture, the early Christian tradition, and Catholic social teaching. Religious sources outside the Christian tradition will include Gandhi, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Badshah Khan. This course will use the method of community-based learning and will require 20 hours of service at particular sites in the South Bend area.
 
THEO 30047 (CBL) / CSC 33977
Social Concerns Seminar: Hands of St. Andre
Marley Bonnichsen, Melissa
Credit Hours: 1
This seminage (seminar/pilgrimage) will examine the life and spirit of St. Andre Bessette and the multiple ways in which humanity is impoverished (financial and spiritual). Students will have the opportunity to travel to Andre House in Phoenix AZ over fall break and bear witness to the Gospel and spirit of Brother Andre by serving the local community through the Andre hospitality houses, reflecting upon our own internal poverty through prayer and reflection, and engaging in a larger conversation around systemic poverty and the need for communal, internal, and societal healing.
 
THEO 30350 (sec. 1 & sec. 3) (CBL) / SUS 20350 (CBL) / CST 23470 (CBL)
Sustainability at Notre Dame
Pfeil, Margaret
Credit Hours: 2
This course will address sustainability in the context of the local academic community and its institutions. In light of the recent papal encyclical, Laudato Si', On Care for Our Common Home, this course will provide students interdisciplinary opportunities to explore the challenges of sustainability and to develop collaborative strategies for making our common campus homes more sustainable. This course will be offered concurrently at ND, SMC, and HCC, and will be co-taught by faculty from all three campuses. It will meet in rotation on each of the three campuses once per week for two hours. Students will be invited to examine the course materials in conversation with the mission of the Congregation of Holy Cross through immersion at each of the campuses and encounters with the sisters, brothers, and priests of Holy Cross and with sustainability professionals.
 
THEO 33858 (CBL) / CSC 33858 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: International Issues
Tomas Morgan, Rachel
Credit Hours: 1
This course revolves around international experiential learning opportunities, examining the culture, community, and life of the people encountered, including the poor. Students participate in preparation and follow-up sessions.
 
THEO 33933 (CBL) / ILS 33800 (CBL) / CSC 33933 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning (CCLP) (Chicago)
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 3
This is a leadership internship for Cross-cultural/Urban studies working 8 weeks in a multicultural area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will work with ILS to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved. Students will complete academic requirements including readings, reflection sessions, and a presentation of a synthesis paper at the end of the internship. Application and interview necessary for participation.
 
THEO 33936 (CBL) / CSC 33936 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins
Wilson, Benjamin
Credit Hours: 3
Immersion: Eight-week summer service-learning placements This three-credit course of the Summer Service Learning Program takes place before, during, and after student participation in the eight consecutive week summer immersion sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Notre Dame Alumni Association. The goal of the course is to reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through experiential learning, reading, writing and discussions. Writing assignments include journal assignments and a final paper. The course is completed during the first five weeks of fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. Acceptance is based on the student's application and interview. Contact the Center for Social Concerns for more information.
 
THEO 33938 (CBL) / CSC 33938 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar, International Issues
Tomas Morgan, Rachel
Credit Hours: 3
This course and internship is synonymous with the Center for Social Concerns International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP). The course seeks to challenge students who have domestic service-learning experiences to encounter international realities, and to provide them the opportunity to work with persons and grass roots groups working to address the needs of the poor internationally. The learning goals of the course are to gain and understanding of the multi- dimensionality of poverty in the developing world; analyze root causes, and identify strategies for social development (poverty alleviation); to gain an understanding of international social issues in light of Catholic social teaching; and to strengthen cross-cultural competencies.Academic requirements include a journal, reading and writing assignments during the summer months, a mandatory day retreat on Monday, August 20, 2018, four re-entry classes meeting on Thursdays 6:30 - 7:45 pm on August 23, 30 and September 6 and 13, and a final paper/project. Apply online via the Center for Social Concerns website: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic/
 
THEO 33950 (CBL) / CSC 33950 & 63950 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia
Lantz, Kyle
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.
 
THEO 33952 (CBL/EL) / CSC 33952 (CBL/EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Social Change
Marley Bronnichsen, Melissa
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar allows students to participate in an experiential opportunity designed to examine contemporary social problems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.
 
THEO 33961 (EL) / CSC 33961 (EL)
Discernment
Hebbeler, Michael
Credit Hours: 1
The Discernment Seminar provides undergraduate students an opportunity to reflect on their encounters and discover how and where God is inviting them to be their authentic selves. Whether considering a change in major or deciding on postgraduate plans, navigating a relationship or seeking greater intentionality in daily life, students in this class will accompany each other as they explore their respective vocations and develop disciplines to listen and respond to these callings. Content will include Catholic Social Teaching, cultural critique, narrative theology, spiritual direction and the arts.
 
THEO 33962 (CBL) / CSC 33962 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Gospel of Life
Marley Bonnichsen, Melissa
Credit Hours: 1
The goal of the Gospel of Life Seminar is to provide students with the opportunity to read and reflect on a consistent ethic of life through experiential learning. Exploration begins in the orientation classes where students will become familiar with various life issues through readings, lectures, and by meeting people who work on life-related issues. Fall break will be spent on immersion, most likely DC but location TBA for fall 2015. The seminar participants will meet with various organizations that can speak to a consistent ethic of life (government offices, NGO's, advocacy groups, etc) as well as participating in serving the local community as students engage in honoring the life of all, including those on the margins. The follow-up classes facilitate analysis and synthesis of insights gained during the week of experiential learning. For more information on the course please see: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic/fall/gospeloflife.shtml
 
THEO 33965 / CSC 33965 / CST 33965
Social Concerns: Organizing Power & Hope
Marley Bonnichsen, Melissa; Caponigro, Jerome
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar focuses on diverse church, school, leadership, and community-organizing initiatives to improve life in Chicago neighborhoods. Participants will be challenged to examine perceptions of power, service and social action.
 
THEO 33975 (CBL) / CSC 33975 (CBL)
Poverty and Development in Chile
Holguin, Jimena
Credit Hours: 1
THEO 33975/CSC 33975 (1.0 credit) serves as the required orientation course for all students who will participate in the Approaches to Poverty and Development course offered through the Universidad Alberto Hurtado in Santiago, Chile as part of the Santiago study abroad program. The course will provide students with information regarding many of the themes and topics that will be explored further in the UAH course. This one-credit preparatory course will provide the necessary information to facilitate a richer and more meaningful experience while in Chile. Students must first be accepted into the Santiago semester abroad program through the Office of International Studies before being able to apply for this course.
 
THEO 40632 (CBL/EL)
Heart’s Desire and Social Change
Groody, Daniel
Credit Hours: 3
Beyond financial prosperity and material gain, many people today speak about the hunger to find purpose and meaningful work that has lasting impact on society, culture, and the global community. We not only want to find lucrative employment but to discover a way of life that resonates with the deepest part of ourselves. When we experience a consistent flow between our life's energies and our daily tasks, we are the most alive, engaged and at peace. But how can we find a way to integrate our inner and outer lives? This course will help students clarify their deepest passions in life that facilitate personal formation and social transformation. At its core it will explore the process of self-awareness and self-development that lead ultimately to self-gift. Some of the major themes we will look at include: values, spirituality, discernment, identity, true self/false self, justice, flow, freedom, Catholic Social Teaching and mission.

 

 

 

WRITING AND RHETORIC

WR 13200 (sec, 1- sec. 8) (CBL)
Community Writing and Rhetoric
Various Professors
Credit Hours: 3
In cooperation with the Center for Social Concerns, these sections of composition place students in learning situations in the wider community where they are in contact with people who are dealing with the specific content issue of their section. We welcome students with commitment to social justice and community service to enroll.

 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

 

 

AEROSPACE & MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

AME 30362 (CBL)
Design Methodology
Schmiedeler, James
Credit Hours: 3
Modeling and analysis of mechanical systems. Automated design decision process, introduction to statistical methods, material engineering, requirements definition, and product specifications. 

 

 

 

CIVIL ENGINEERING

CE 35620 (CBL/EL)
Engineering Design Projects
Brockman, Jay
Credit Hours: 3
The most critical engineering challenges of our time require innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to create human-centered solutions. Through this project-based course, students will learn different methods to approach these problems and will gain real engineering experience by tackling current challenges here in South Bend. Students will work on semester long projects with Notre Dame faculty and leaders in the South Bend community in a small, collaborative environment, providing opportunities for mentorship and professional development. Project topics may include, but are not limited to, water management, data analytics, internet of things, and app development. At the end of the semester, students will use feedback on the pilot project to make recommendations to the partner organization for project execution on a larger scale. Please contact Maria Krug at mkrug1@nd.edu for more details about the course.
 
CE 40701 (EL)
Principles of Practice
Kerr, Elizabeth; Horvath, Eric
Credit Hours: 1
An integrated, multi-disciplinary civil engineering design experience. The course will include a review of the civil engineering design process, professional considerations and preliminary design aspects.

 

 

 

COLLEGE SEMINAR

CSEM 23101  (sec. 3 & sec. 4)
Common Good Defining Community
Purcell, William; Sedmak, Clemens
Credit Hours: 3
We all need communities. The common good is what society seeks to achieve. Community is where the common good is developed, nurtured and achieved. The concept of the common good is challenging: which good(s) and why? Who's good and for what purpose?  This seminar will explore the concept of the common good with a special emphasis on community building, including various theories and forms of community.

The course seeks to connect theoretical insights with experiences on the ground; it is a community-based seminar: Community-based learning offers the opportunity to integrate learning and service. Classroom discussions and course readings should inform how students approach their service and interactions in the community, and their service should inform classroom discussions and the reading of articles and essays. In the context of this course, community-based learning is intended to provide a structured way for students to understand and experience communities, efforts to build communities and to contribute to the common good.

Students will make a commitment to participate weekly (from weeks 2-14 of the semester) in a service activity at one of four sites in the South Bend area. The usual time commitment at these sites is 2 hours per visit, not including transportation time. These organizations are in partnership with the Center for Social Concerns, providing community-based learning coordinators who work with ND students to support learning and service experiences on-site.

The community-based nature of the course will ensure that there will be experience-guided discussions on community-building and the common good.

 

 

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

CSE 20600 & 40600 (sec. 2, sec. 3, sec. 4, &  sec. 28)  (CBL/CBR)
CSE Service Projects
Various Professors
Credit Hours: 1-3
Engineering projects in community service.
 
CSE 30246 (EL)
Database Concepts
Weninger, Timothy
Credit Hours: 3
Effective techniques in managing, retrieving and updating information from a database system. Focusing primarily on relational databases, the course presents the entity-relationship model, query processing, and normalization. Topics such as relational calculus and algebra, integrity constraints, distributed databases, and data security will also be discussed. A final project will consist of the design and the implementation of a database system with a Web interface.
 
CSE 40586 (CBL/CBR)
Low Vision Mentorship Project in Computer Science Education
McMillan, Collin
Credit Hours: 3
In this course, Notre Dame students will be paired with students at the Illinois School for the Visually Impaired (ISVI) who are learning computer programming. ND students will work with the ISVI students to teach computer science, as well as to learn about the barriers to entry faced by low vision students to technology careers. Mentorship activities will be directed and supervised by ND faculty, and course/grade objectives align with outcomes for the ISVI students.

 

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

 

 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

BIOS 40202 (sec. 1 & sec. 2) (CBR)
Developmental Neuroscience
Michael, Nancy
Credit Hours: 3
This is an upper level seminar that is intended provide a deep dive into the field of developmental neuroscience, while challenging you to apply complex developmental principles to real life situations. We begin our exploration of developmental principles in the adolescent brain, rooting the student as the primary stakeholder in the content. From the very beginning of the semester, you will be challenged to consider all of the events (genetic, environmental, etc.) that have created your brain. Through discussions based in primary literature, we will then work backward through sensitive and critical periods of early childhood brain development, finishing the semester with classical cellular and molecular developmental neuroscience. Through analysis and discussion of primary literature, regular writing assignments and a strong community based learning component, the work of this course emphasizes critical review of primary literature and translation of scientific principles to individuals outside of the neuroscience field. The semester long community-based learning component will culminate with a brain-health capstone presentation to your community partner organization. The capstone design aims to have you apply all of the skills you have practiced during the semester by creating an engaging developmental neuroscience activity that requires 1) analysis and synthesis of primary literature 2) translation of that primary literature to a non-science audience that distills the information in such a way that it 3) informs and 4) motivates positive behavioral change.
 
BIOS 50544 (CBL/CBR) / PHIL 43308 (CBL/CBR) / STV 43396 (CBL/CBR)
Environmental Justice
Shrader-Frechette, Kristin
Credit Hours: 3
Environmental injustice (EIJ) refers to the fact that children, minorities, and poor people receive higher exposures to environmental toxins that damage their health and kill them. This course is designed to understand and to address EIJ, and it is for people interested in environmental problems and the social injustices that they cause. It will cover flaws in scientific method and in ethics that cause EIJ. Course is hands-on, practical, and dedicated to showing students how to do environment-related social-justice analysis and how to analyze environmental-impact assessments. Students choose individual projects on which to work, and these projects determine most of the course grade. These projects also are designed to help influence environmental policy or to serve the needs of specific pollution-threatened poor or minority communities. For more information, see the syllabus at www.nd.edu/~kshrader/courses/ Course Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required if student is not a philosophy, pre-med, science, math, or engineering major (via email to kshrader@nd.edu) to register for course. Course Requirements: There are weekly quizzes; but no tests and no exams, 2 short, analytic papers; participation in classroom analysis, and one student-chosen project. Students each choose an EJ project on which to work, so that they can use techniques (learned in the course) to promote real-world social justice and improved use of scientific methods in specific poor or minority communities who are victimized by pollution. There are no exams. Course Texts include Peter Singer, One World; Shrader-Frechette, Environmental Justice; and a variety of articles from scientific and medical journals.

 

 

 

CHEMISTRY & BIOCHEMISTRY

CHEM 30331 (CBL/CBR)
Chemistry in Service of the Community
Lieberman, Marya
Credit Hours: 2
Addressing the problem of lead contamination in the community, students will visit area homes and collect paint, dust, and soil samples. After analyzing these samples in CHEM 31333, students will help homeowners reduce the health risks associated with exposing young children to lead.

 

 

 

SCIENCE PRE-PROFESSIONAL

SCPP 46397 (CBL/CBR)
Directed Readings
Vachon, Dominic; Foster, James
Credit Hours: 1-3
Permission required. Readings focus on learning how patients, families, and healthcare professionals experience illness and healing, how the stories that patients tell become the basis for diagnosis and therapeutic response, what it's like to go through medical training and grow in identity as a physician, and the nature of the doctor-patient relationship and how it is changing. Fall and spring. Note: This course counts as a general elective.

 

 

 

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND VALUES

STV 20603 (CBL/CBR) / KSGA 40200 (CBL/CBR) / MGA 40806 (CBL/CBR) / ANTH 40200 (CBL/CBR) / IIPS 30304 (CBL/CBR) / IDS 40830 (CBL/CBR) / SOC 40200 (CBL/CBR)
Visualizing Global Change
Kay, Tamara
Credit Hours: 3
The goal of the course is to compare the processes by which social scientists and filmmakers/photographers engage in social documentation. Students explore how global social problems such as rural and urban poverty, race and gender inequalities, immigration, and violence are analyzed across the social sciences, and depicted in a variety of documentary film and photography genres. The course also explores the role that documentary photography and film play in promoting rights and advocating for social change, particularly in the realm of human rights and global inequality. It examines the history of documentary film and photography in relationship to politics, and to the development of concerns across the social sciences with inequality and social justice. It also looks at how individual documentarians, non-profit organizations and social movements use film and photography to further their goals and causes, and issues of representation their choices raise. The course is also unique because it requires students to engage in the process of visual documentation themselves by incorporating an activity-based learning component. For their final project, students choose a human rights or social problem that concerns or interests them (and which they can document locally, no travel is required), prepare a documentary exhibit on the chosen topic (10-12 photographs), and write a 12-15 page paper analyzing how 2-3 social scientists construct and frame the given problem. Students also have the option to produce a short documentary film.
 
STV 43396 (CBL/CBR) / PHIL 43308 (CBL/CBR) / BIOS 50544 (CBL/CBR)
Environmental Justice
Shrader-Frechette, Kristin
Credit Hours: 3
Environmental injustice(EIJ) refers to the fact that children, minorities, and poor people receive higher exposures to environmental toxins that damage their health and kill them. This course is designed to understand and to address EIJ, and it is for people interested in environmental problems and the social injustices that they cause. It will cover flaws in scientific method and in ethics that cause EIJ. Course is hands-on, practical, and dedicated to showing students how to do environment-related social-justice analysis and how to analyze environmental-impact assessments. Students choose individual projects on which to work, and these projects determine most of the course grade. These projects also are designed to help influence environmental policy or to serve the needs of specific pollution-threatened poor or minority communities. For more information, see the syllabus at www.nd.edu/~kshrader/courses/ Course Prerequisites: Instructor's permission required if student is not a philosophy, pre-med, science, math, or engineering major (via email to kshrader@nd.edu) to register for course. Course Requirements: There are weekly quizzes; but no tests and no exams, 2 short, analytic papers; participation in classroom analysis, and one student-chosen project. Students each choose an EJ project on which to work, so that they can use techniques (learned in the course) to promote real-world social justice and improved use of scientific methods in specific poor or minority communities who are victimized by pollution. There are no exams. Course Texts include Peter Singer, One World; Shrader-Frechette, Environmental Justice; and a variety of articles from scientific and medical journals.

 

LAW SCHOOL

LAW SCHOOL

LAW 70365 (EL)
Federal Criminal Practice
Blakey, John; Berg, Leslie; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 3
Taught by a former federal prosecutor and present white-collar defense attorney, and a former state and federal prosecutor and present U.S. District Court Judge, this course focuses on strategic thinking and structural case planning in federal criminal litigation, as well as topical and ethical issues facing federal-criminal practitioners today. In particular, the course focuses on critical substantive issues in federal criminal law, and further analyzes the chronology of complicated federal-criminal investigations beginning with issues relating to the start of investigations by federal authorities, continuing with grand-jury proceedings and indictment, and finishing with strategic issues relating trial and sentencing. With regard to these stages, the instructors will present issues that the government, corporate counsel, and criminal-defense counsel face, such as the propriety of various undercover techniques, charging considerations, and decision regarding the joint representation of targets and relating to joint-defense agreements, and strategies regarding plea negotiations. This course also includes real-world case studies, and federal court observation and videotaped student presentations and discussion, based upon a pending case in Chicago, Illinois.
 
LAW 70720 (CBL)
Corporate Counsel Externship - Instruction
Hays, Michael; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 1
The Corporate Counsel Externship course allows students to perform 8-12 hours of legal work per week in in an in-house corporate counsel office while participating in a companion weekly seminar. Placements include private sector, non-profit, and governmental corporate counsel. Students earn three credits (two of which are fieldwork credits) for an eight hour weekly field placement or four credits (three of which are fieldwork credits) for a 12 hour weekly field placement. Placements must involve substantial legal work under the careful supervision of an attorney. Placements are typically in the Michiana area, but students are free to choose placements in other regional cities including Chicago and Indianapolis. All placements must be approved by the instructor and must be finalized before a student may enroll in the course.
 
LAW 70726 (CBL)
Applied Mediation
Jenuwine, Michael; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 5
This course is open to second- and third-year law students interested in providing mediation services to individuals currently litigating disputes in the courts of St. Joseph and surrounding counties. Through this course, students will have the opportunity to serve as mediators in actual cases involving both civil and domestic relations matters, including child custody, support, parenting time, landlord-tenant disputes, contract disputes, and other matters referred by the courts for mediation. The classroom component of the course will focus on the development of mediation skills and exploration of advanced mediation topics.
 
LAW 70728 (CBL)
Applied Mediation II
Jenuwine, Michael; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 1-3
Allows students who have satisfactorily completed Applied Mediation to progress to more advanced mediation skills as specifically applied to domestic relations cases. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.
 
LAW 70730 (CBL)
Immigration Externship - Instruction
Koop, Lisa; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 1
Four NDLS students will have the opportunity to practice immigration law under the supervision of an experienced NIJC immigration attorney by providing immigration legal services to low-income immigrants in Indiana through NIJC. NIJC will select, screen and house all cases handled through this externship. Students will meet as a class once a week for one hour of instruction on substantive immigration law and lawyering skills, guided discussion and case review. Students will spend an additional eight hours each week conducting case work. Students will handle the representation of one or more NIJC clients and seek immigration benefits before federal agencies and courts. Students will conduct initial intake interviews, identify client eligibility for immigration benefits, complete immigration applications, compile supporting documentation and write legal memoranda. There are no required courses students must take in advance of participating in this externship. However, Administrative Law (70315), Advanced Legal Research (70207), Appellate Advocacy Seminar (73314), Immigration Law (70301), and Introduction to International Human Rights (70417) are recommended. Registration is by permission only. Interested students should submit a cover letter, resume and informal transcript to Lisa Koop at LKoop@heartalliance.org.
 
LAW 70733 (CBL)
Public Defender Externship - Instruction
Bradley, Gerard; Hamilton, Anne; Krull, Gloria
Credit Hours: 1
Involves assisting actual public defenders in representing indigent clients at the St. Joseph County Courthouse - Trial and Misdemeanor Division. Students can expect to represent clients in many capacities, some of which include negotiating plea bargains with prosecutors; preparing and conducting bench trials; interviewing and subpoenaing witnesses; writing and filing discovery motions; and other activities within the administration of justice. Students are expected to work at the courthouse one full morning or afternoon each week. Besides the courtroom experience, students must attend class sessions that feature prosecutors, police officers, public defenders, judges, and probation officers lecturing on their duties as officers of the court. Enrollment: limited each semester at the discretion of the instructor.
 
LAW 70736 (CBL)
Lawyering Practice Instruction
Jones, Robert; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 1
The Lawyering Practice Externship Course allows students to perform 8-12 hours of legal work per week in any court, governmental agency, nonprofit organization, or in-house corporate counsel office while participating in a companion weekly seminar. Students earn three credits (two of which are fieldwork credits) for an eight hour weekly field placement or four credits (three of which are fieldwork credits) for a 12 hour weekly field placement. Placements must involve substantial legal work under the careful supervision of an attorney or judge. Placements are typically in the Michiana area, but students are free to choose placements in other regional cities including Chicago and Indianapolis. Students may not choose placements already offered in existing local externship courses (St. Joseph County Public Defender, South Bend office of the National Immigrant Justice Center, Notre Dame Athletic Department or athletics compliance within Notre Dame's General Counsel's Office). All placements must be approved by the instructor and must be finalized before a student may enroll in the course.
 
LAW 70908 (CBL)
Intercollegiate Athletic Externship - Instruction
Edmonds, Edmund; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 1
The Intercollegiate Externship will provide an opportunity for law students to gain practical experience and academic credit in intercollegiate athletics administration through a classroom component taught by Law School faculty and senior-level administrator-attorneys from Athletics and via non-classroom externship work. Potential duties include reviewing contracts; assisting in the creation and revision of departmental policy; researching legal issues related to athletics; researching compliance issues; drafting, reviewing and revising compliance education materials; and auditing eligibility and other compliance-related forms.
 
LAW 75605 (CBL)
Tax Clinic
Thomas, Patrick; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 5
Students in the Tax Clinic represent low income clients in controversies with the Internal Revenue Service and in litigation in the United States Tax Court and possibly other federal courts. The clinic is located in the Clinical Law Center at 725 Howard Street. Students play a "first chair" role interviewing and counseling clients, conducting factual investigations, determining alternatives for resolving disputes, advocating on the client's behalf, and negotiating agreements with the IRS. Students may also participate in community outreach and education on taxpayer issues. The classroom portion of the course covers tax procedure and relevant substantive law along with basic lawyering skills necessary to effective representation of taxpayers. Pre-requisite: Federal Income Taxation (70605). Additional pre-requisite or co-requisite: Professional Responsibility (70807 or 70808).
 
LAW 75606 (CBL)
Tax Clinic II
Thomas, Patrick
Credit Hours: 1-3
Variable credit and letter-graded course open to students who have satisfactorily completed Tax Clinic I. Tax Clinic II allows students to progress to more advanced lawyering skills as applied to federal tax controversies. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.
 
LAW 75720 (CBL)
Corporate Counsel Externship - Fieldwork
Hays, Michael; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 2-3
The Corporate Counsel Externship course allows students to perform 8-12 hours of legal work per week in in an in-house corporate counsel office while participating in a companion weekly seminar. Placements include private sector, non-profit, and governmental corporate counsel. Students earn three credits (two of which are fieldwork credits) for an eight hour weekly field placement or four credits (three of which are fieldwork credits) for a 12 hour weekly field placement. Placements must involve substantial legal work under the careful supervision of an attorney. Placements are typically in the Michiana area, but students are free to choose placements in other regional cities including Chicago and Indianapolis. All placements must be approved by the instructor and must be finalized before a student may enroll in the course.
 
LAW 75721 ( Sec. 1 & sec. 2)  (CBL)
Economic Justice Clinic I
Fox, Judith; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 5
This is a 5-credit, letter-graded course providing training in basic lawyering skills, including interviewing and counseling, as well as ethics, substantive law and procedural law relevant to the representation of clients in litigation and transactions. Students represent clients under the close supervision of a clinical faculty member. The case types vary somewhat among the sections, as described below. The classroom component of the course uses a combined lecture and mock exercise format. Students are sometimes required to participate in a community education presentation. Pre- or co-requisite: Professional Responsibility (LAW 70807 or LAW 70808)
 
LAW 75724 (CBL)
Intellectual Property and the Entrepreneurial Law Clinic
Clifford, Joanne; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 5
The Intellectual Property and Entrepreneurship Clinic is a 5-credit, letter-graded course providing training in basic lawyering skills, including interviewing and counseling, as well as substantive law. The classroom component of the course uses an interactive approach including lectures and mock lawyering exercises. Through this course student will work directly with clients on intellectual property issues, such as patentability searches and provisional patent applications, trademark searches and registration, as well as intellectual property license issues and agreements.
 
LAW 75728 (CBL)
Intellectual Property and the Entrepreneurial Law Clinic II
Clifford, Joanne; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 1-3
The Intellectual Property Clinic is a letter-graded course providing training in basic lawyering skills, including interviewing and counseling, as well as substantive law. The classroom component of the course uses an interactive approach including lectures and mock lawyering exercises. Through this course student will work directly with clients on intellectual property issues, such as patentability searches and provisional patent applications, trademark searches and registration, as well as intellectual property license issues and agreements.
 
LAW 75731 (CBL)
Legal Externship - Summer
Jones, Robert; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 1
One unit of cocurricular academic credit may be awarded for student volunteer legal work of six weeks or more undertaken during the summer months in any court, governmental agency, nonprofit organization, public law office or in-house corporate counsel office. The work must be conducted under faculty supervision, conform to the approved standards of the faculty, and have the advance approval of the associate dean for academic affairs. This one unit of cocurricular credit may count toward graduation requirements as one of the six maximum allowable cocurricular credits, but cannot count toward the minimum hours required during any semester for residency. The credit will be reflected on a student's transcript.
 
LAW 75732 (CBL)
Street Law (Co-Curricular)
Robinson, John; Hamilton, Anne; Sumption, Debbie
Credit Hours: 2
Students taking this course teach portions of an American Government Course at a local high school twice a week for twelve weeks. Prior to the beginning of their teaching, and again a few weeks into their teaching, they receive some guidance on how best to teach contemporary high-school students. Towards the end of their teaching, they submit a paper that they have written on the successes and failures that they have experienced over the course of the semester in question.
 
LAW 75733 (CBL)
Public Defender Externship
Bradley, Gerard; Monterrosa, Rodolfo; Hamilton, Anne; Krull, Gloria
Credit Hours: 1
Involves assisting actual public defenders in representing indigent clients at the St. Joseph County Courthouse-Trial and Misdemeanor Division. Students can expect to represent clients in many capacities, some of which include: negotiating plea bargains with prosecutors; preparing and conducting bench trials; interviewing and subpoenaing witnesses; writing and filing discovery motions; and other activities within the administration of justice. Students are expected to work at the courthouse one full morning or afternoon each week. Besides the courtroom experience, students must attend class sessions once per week that feature prosecutors, police officers, public defenders, judges and probation officers lecturing on their duties as officers of the court. Enrollment: limited each semester at the discretion of the instructor.
 
LAW 75734 (CBL/EL)
Immigration Externship
Koop, Lisa; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 2
Four NDLS students will have the opportunity to practice immigration law under the supervision of an experienced NIJC immigration attorney by providing immigration legal services to low-income immigrants in Indiana through NIJC. NIJC will select, screen and house all cases handled through this externship. Students will meet as a class once a week for one hour of instruction on substantive immigration law and lawyering skills, guided discussion and case review. Students will spend an additional eight hours each week conducting case work. Students will handle the representation of one or more NIJC clients and seek immigration benefits before federal agencies and courts. Students will conduct initial intake interviews, identify client eligibility for immigration benefits, complete immigration applications, compile supporting documentation and write legal memoranda. There are no required courses students must take in advance of participating in this externship. However, Administrative Law (70315), Advanced Legal Research (70207), Appellate Advocacy Seminar (73314), Immigration Law (70301), and Introduction to International Human Rights (70417) are recommended. Registration is by permission only. Interested students should submit a cover letter, resume and informal transcript to Lisa Koop at LKoop@heartalliance.org.
 
LAW 75735 (CBL)
Legal Externship Public Defender (Co-Curricular)
Bradley, Gerard; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 1
Students who have completed the externship requirements of LAW 592A may enroll for additional cocurricular credit. Students may work in the Trial and Misdemeanor division at the St. Joseph County Courthouse, or may assist felony public defenders. Those who work for the felony public defenders must agree to work at least 60 hours over the course of the semester.
 
LAW 75736 (CBL/EL)
Lawyering Externship Fieldwork
Jones, Robert; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 1-3
The Lawyering Practice Externship Course allows students to perform 8-12 hours of legal work per week in any court, governmental agency, nonprofit organization, or in-house corporate counsel office while participating in a companion weekly seminar. Students earn three credits (two of which are fieldwork credits) for an eight hour weekly field placement or four credits (three of which are fieldwork credits) for a 12 hour weekly field placement. Placements must involve substantial legal work under the careful supervision of an attorney or judge. Placements are typically in the Michiana area, but students are free to choose placements in other regional cities including Chicago and Indianapolis. Students may not choose placements already offered in existing local externship courses (St. Joseph County Public Defender, South Bend office of the National Immigrant Justice Center, Notre Dame Athletic Department or athletics compliance within Notre Dame's General Counsel's Office). All placements must be approved by the instructor and must be finalized before a student may enroll in the course.
 
LAW 75737 (CBL/EL)
Seventh Circuit Practice Externship Fieldwork
Jones, Robert; Palmer, Robert; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 1-3
Students will work on Seventh Circuit cases in this fieldwork course.
 
LAW 75760 (CBL)
ND Law in Chicago Field Placement Externship
Jones, Robert
Credit Hours: 8
Students in the Chicago Program will earn 8 academic credits for working 32 hours per week in a Chicago-area non-profit legal agency, governmental law office, judicial chambers, or in-house corporate counsel office. Students will engage in substantive legal work under the careful supervision of an attorney or judge who commits to serving in a mentoring role. Some placements will offer the opportunity to engage in client representation pursuant to an Illinois student practice license, commonly known as a 711 license. Enrollment is by permission only. Students who enroll in this course must also enroll in the companion two-credit, graded Chicago Program: Seminar, which meets weekly in Chicago. In addition to the ten credits earned through the field placement and associated seminar, participating students must earn 4 additional credits through non-externship courses offered in either South Bend or Chicago. 
 
 
LAW 75800 (CBL/EL)
Appalachia Externship
Jones, Robert; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 1
The Appalachia Externship is a one credit academic externship. Students spend their fall break or spring break providing pro bono legal services at the Appalachian Research and Defense Fund of Kentucky (AppalReD), which is the federal and state-funded low income legal services provider for the Appalachian region of Kentucky. Students also participate in the Appalachia Seminar sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns, which involves several classroom sessions, reading assignments, and written assignments exploring the culture and social issues of the Appalachia region, as well as Catholic Social Teaching. This course does not meet the Skills Requirement.
 
LAW 75908 (CBL/EL)
Intercollegiate Athletics Externship
Edmonds, Edmund; Hamilton, Anne
Credit Hours: 2
The Intercollegiate Externship will provide an opportunity for law students to gain practical experience and academic credit in intercollegiate athletics administration through a classroom component taught by Law School faculty and senior-level administrator-attorneys from Athletics and via non-classroom externship work. Potential duties include reviewing contracts; assisting in the creation and revision of departmental policy; researching legal issues related to athletics; researching compliance issues; drafting, reviewing and revising compliance education materials; and auditing eligibility and other compliance-related forms.

 

MENDOZA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

 

 

 

ACCOUNTANCY

ACCT 40790 & 76791 (CBL)
Accounting and Reporting for Not-for-Profit Organizations
Kroll, Douglas
Credit Hours: 3
To introduce students to the accounting practices of fund accounting as it relates to governmental and not-for-profit organizations. The class will also provide a basic understanding of these entities to students who will either work in the not-for-profit sector or who will be exposed to them in public accounting. The class will be both theory and practice oriented.

 

 

 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION-SC

BASC 20200 (sec. 1 -  sec. 5) (EL) / MGTO 20100 (EL)
Principles of Management
Stevens, Christopher
Credit Hours: 3
A study of the management process, including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. Emphasis is placed on executive leadership, organizational behavior, and management theory.
 
BASC 20250 (sec. 7 - sec. 10)  (EL) / MARK 20100 (EL)
Principles of Marketing
Garbinsky, Emily
Credit Hours: 3
A study of markets, institutions, and the environment in which business firms operate with attention to the effect these facets, forces, and issues have on the firm's overall marketing strategy.

 

 

 

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, ANALYTICS, AND OPERATIONS

ITAO 40660 (sec. 1 &  sec. 2)  (EL)
IT Project Management
Corrente, Christopher
Credit Hours: 1.5
Whether you become a high-profile real estate developer, an investment banker, or an entrepreneur, in any career you'll need some project management skills to get your job done. Everyone tries to get projects finished on time and under budget, but many critical business projects fail anyway. We'll learn the steps associated with successful project management, examine some optimization techniques, learn how to use the software tools that enhance productivity, and discuss how to avoid the implementation pitfalls that cause good people doing good projects to fail.

 

 

 

MANAGEMENT

MGTO 20100 (EL) / BASC 20200 (sec. 1 -  sec. 5) (EL)
Principles of Management
Stevens, Christopher
Credit Hours: 3
A study of the management process, including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. Emphasis is placed on executive leadership, organizational behavior, and management theory.
 
MGTO 30510 (sec. 1 & sec 2) CBL) / CST 30505 (CBL) / HESB 30303 (CBL) / IIPS 30925 (CBL)
Social Entrepreneurship
Hurst, Charlice
Credit Hours: 3
Social Entrepreneurship (formerly MicroVenturing I) explores the innovative concepts, practices and strategies associated with building, sustaining, and replicating social impact organizations in less developed countries (LDCs) and here in the United States. Many dynamic organizations are aspiring to a "double" or "triple bottom line" - beneficial human impact, environmental sustainability, and profitability. This course exposes students to a new and growing trend in leadership, venture creation, product design, and service delivery which uses the basic entrepreneurial template to transform the landscape of both for-profit and not-for-profit ventures. In addition, students will analyze various social enterprise business models, including microfinance, microenterprise development, bottom of the pyramid, etc., and will devise strategies and tactics to improve the efficacy of these ventures, as well as engage in research seeking to advance the field of social enterprise at Notre Dame.
 
MGTO 70550 (CBL)
Social Innovation
Hurst, Charlice
Credit Hours: 2
Social innovation is defined as "a novel solution to a social problem that is more effective, efficient, sustainable, or just than current solutions." This course will ground students in the theory and practice of social innovation while also developing skills through field work with South Bend partners on issues related to economic insecurity. The in-class portion of the course will utilize cases, guest speakers, articles, self-assessments, and discussion. For the field work portion, teams of students will (1) examine and strengthen processes within an organization that affect its ability to engage in social innovation and (2) assist in building organizations' capacities to leverage relationships with other entities, particularly businesses, to generate and implement innovative solutions to problems related to economic insecurity. Students will be taught to approach their work through the lens of appreciative inquiry, which is an approach to organizational development that emphasizes discovery of and capitalization upon the strengths of an organization or organizational ecosystem.

 

 

 

MARKETING

MARK 20100 (EL) / BASC 20250 (sec. 7, 8 ,9 )  (EL)
Principles of Marketing
Garbinsky, Emily
Credit Hours: 3
A study of markets, institutions, and the environment in which business firms operate with attention to the effect these facets, forces, and issues have on the firm's overall marketing strategy.
 
MARK 30120 (CBR)
Marketing Research
Wilkie, James
Credit Hours: 3
Required for all marketing majors. A study of the application of scientific method to the definition and solution of marketing problems with attention to research design, sampling theory, methods of data collection and the use of statistical techniques in the data analysis.

 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

 

 

ARCHITECTURE

ARCH 40312 / PSY 33685 & 60685
Soc. Factors & Sustainability
Rollings, Kimberly
Credit Hours: 3
This course focuses on the interaction between people and the physical environment on human health, well-being, behavior, and sustainability. Social and physical factors across multiple scales - from specific environments (residential, educational, work, healthcare, and commercial), urban and natural settings, to the planet - are explored. Issues of public health, environmental justice, universal design, and culture are included throughout. Lecture and discussion class with hands-on assignments and quizzes. Upper level undergraduate and graduate students from across the University and especially in architecture, the sustainability minor, design, pre-professional studies, social sciences, and business are encouraged to enroll.
 
ARCH 41111 (sec. 2, 3 ,4) (CBL)
Design V
Steil, Lucien 
Credit Hours: 6
Design V involves the design of buildings within urban settings, with a special emphasis on building types in relation to cultural, ethnic, and civic priorities.
 
ARCH 81151 (EL)
Urban Design II
Bess, Philip 
Credit Hours: 6
Part two of a two-studio sequence for students concentrating in urban design, entailing an on-site real-world charrette to create a neighborhood or town plan and the graphic documents and legal mechanisms needed to implement it.

 

CENTERS AND INSTITUTES

 

 

 

CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS

CSC 33000 (CBL/CBR) / CST 33000 (CBL/CBR)
Social Change Fellows 
Brandenberger, Jay; Marley Bonnichsen,  Melissa
Credit Hours: 2
The Leadership for Social Change Course is the key course for the McNeill Leadership Fellows in the Center for Social Concerns. Working together as a learning community, these students will consider foundations to leadership in the 21st century, the dynamics of the most pressing problems our world has ever considered, and the role of vocation, discernment, catholic social teaching, and innovative leadership for social change necessary to tackle these issues upon graduation from Notre Dame. The yearlong course, offered in two sections, seeks to engage students in a rich interdisciplinary learning space to consider the multi-dimensional realities of 21st century social concerns and the skills and vocational needs necessary to bring about creative solutions and problem solving. Cohort students will form a shared learning community engaged in scholarship, research, and service. Each student is paired with a mentor who will guide them in active discernment as they reflect on the relationship between their vocation and their work for the common good. At the end of the program McNeill Fellows will be equipped with enhanced leadership skills that allow them to recognize and respond to injustice, motivate others towards works of mercy, and work toward the common good in their professional lives. For more information on becoming a McNeill Fellow please see the fellows webpage at: https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/mcneillfellows
 
CSC 33301 (EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Sports & Social Concerns
Lantz, Kyle
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar will explore the vast intersections of sports and social concerns, utilizing a Catholic Social Tradition lens as a framework for discussion, analysis, and action. In U.S. culture, and one could argue global society, there are few activities more all-encompassing and engaging of diverse peoples, resources, and issues as the arena of sports. This thing we call "sports" offers a unique space to think about social concerns. The reality that sports involves vast amounts of media, time, money, people, industries, etc. creates intersections that put various social concerns at the front and center. In recent years sports have crossed paths in significant ways with issues of domestic violence, sexual assault, gender and sexuality, the role of media, the role of protest, religion, collective bargaining, racial justice, ethics, university scandals, and many more. This seminar will explore questions such as: How do sports contribute to our society's common good? How do they threaten our common good? Where does human dignity reside or get compromised in the various arenas of sports? What case studies in sports present interesting and important opportunities for social analysis and reflection? Sports ethics: What tough questions should the public and the sports industries, organizations, and schools be asking themselves in order to move toward a more just and ethical structure? How has sports culture promoted unhealthy societal norms and social concerns? How has sports culture challenged these patterns? For example, one might ask what sports has meant for people experiencing poverty? Course will involve 1 or 2 day trips where we will engage these questions with those directly in the sports industry. Apply online via the Center for Social Concerns website: https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic
 
CSC 33458 (CBL) / SOC 33458 (CBL) / CST 33458 (CBL) / ILS 33701 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Mexico-U.S. Border Immersion Seminar
Beyerlein, Kraig
Credit Hours: 2
This seminar and experiential-learning course is broken into two parts. In the fall (for two credits), students will participate in a seminar that will expose them to various perspectives about immigration issues, especially those related to the Mexico-U.S. border. During our in-class meetings in the fall, (approximately 1 hr. & 40 min. per week), we will discuss scholarly and journalistic accounts of why migrants leave their home countries, the struggles they face during the journey, how U.S. citizens are responding, and possible policy solutions. In the spring (for one credit), students will participate in an immersion trip to the Southern Arizona borderlands during the first week of January and in follow-up classroom meetings (approximately 50 min. per week) during the spring semester to process the immersion experience. During the immersion trip, we will observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, be trained for and participate in humanitarian efforts, tour a Border Patrol and detention facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from faith leaders about their current and past border activism, and visit Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community. Throughout the course, particular focus will be given to the intersection of religion - especially Catholic Social Teachings and border and immigration issues. To be eligible, students must complete an application. Enrollment is competitive. The 15 available spots will be chosen based on the application responses, with preference given to those submitting earliest. Students will be notified about their status within a week of submitting the application. There are fees associated with this seminar (see  website for information). This is a graded course. Department approval is required. [Note: Due to the overlap in content, students who have completed the one-credit version (CSC 33966/SOC 33066/ILS 30804/THEO 33966) cannot take this course.]
 
CSC 33858 (CBL) / THEO 33858 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: International Issues
Tomas Morgan, Rachel
Credit Hours: 1
This course revolves around international experiential learning opportunities, examining the culture, community and life of the people encountered, including the poor. Students participate in preparation and follow-up sessions.
 
CSC 33933 (CBL) / THEO 33933 (CBL) / ILS 33800 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Internship: Cross-Cultural Learning Program (Chicago)
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 3
This is a leadership internship for Cross-cultural/Urban studies working 8 weeks in a multicultural area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will work with ILS to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved. Students will complete academic requirements including readings, reflection sessions, and a presentation of a synthesis paper at the end of the internship. Application and interview necessary for participation.
 
CSC 33936 (CBL) / THEO 33936 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins
Wilson, Benjamin
Credit Hours: 3
Immersion: Eight week summer service-learning placements This three-credit course of the Summer Service Learning Program takes place before, during, and after student participation in the eight consecutive week summer immersion sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Notre Dame Alumni Association. The goal of the course is to reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through experiential learning, reading, writing and discussions. Writing assignments include journal assignments and a final paper. The course is completed during the first five weeks of fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. Acceptance is based on the student's application and interview. Contact the Center for Social Concerns for more information.
 
CSC 33938 (CBL) / THEO 33938 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues: International
Tomas Morgan, Rachel
Credit Hours: 3
This course and internship is synonymous with the Center for Social Concerns International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP). The course seeks to challenge students who have domestic service-learning experiences to encounter international realities, and to provide them the opportunity to work with persons and grass roots groups working to address the needs of the poor internationally. The learning goals of the course are to gain and understanding of the multi-dimensionality of poverty in the developing world; analyze root causes, and identify strategies for social development (poverty alleviation); to gain an understanding of international social issues in light of Catholic social teaching; and to strengthen cross-cultural competencies.Academic requirements include a journal, reading and writing assignments during the summer months, a mandatory day retreat on Monday, August 20, 2018, four re-entry classes meeting on Thursdays 6:30 - 7:45 pm on August 23, 30 and September 6 and 13, and a final paper/project. Apply online via the Center for Social Concerns website: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic/
 
CSC 33950 & CSC 63950 (CBL) / THEO 33950 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia
Lantz, Kyle
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.
 
CSC 33952 (EL) / THEO 33952 (EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Topics in Social Change
Marley Bonnichsen, Melissa
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar allows students to participate in an experiential opportunity designed to examine contemporary social problems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.
 
CSC 33961 (EL) / THEO 33961 (EL)
Discernment
Hebbeler, Michael
Credit Hours: 1
The Discernment Seminar provides undergraduate students an opportunity to reflect on their encounters and discover how and where God is inviting them to be their authentic selves. Whether considering a change in major or deciding on postgraduate plans, navigating a relationship or seeking greater intentionality in daily life, students in this class will accompany each other as they explore their respective vocations and develop disciplines to listen and respond to these callings. Content will include Catholic Social Teaching, cultural critique, narrative theology, spiritual direction and the arts.
 
CSC 33962 (CBL) / THEO 33962 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Gospel of Life
Marley Bonnichsen, Melissa 
Credit Hours: 1
The goal of the Gospel of Life Seminar is to provide students with the opportunity to read and reflect on a consistent ethic of life through experiential learning. Exploration begins in the orientation classes where students will become familiar with various life issues through readings, lectures, and by meeting people who work on life-related issues. Fall break will be spent on immersion, most likely DC but location TBA for fall 2015. The seminar participants will meet with various organizations that can speak to a consistent ethic of life (government offices, NGO's, advocacy groups, etc) as well as participating in serving the local community as students engage in honoring the life of all, including those on the margins. The follow-up classes facilitate analysis and synthesis of insights gained during the week of experiential learning. For more information on the course please see: socialconcerns.nd.edu/content/gospel-life-seminar
 
CSC 33965 / THEO 33965 / CST 33965
Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing Power & Hope
Marley Bonnichsen, Melissa; Caponigro, Jerome
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar focuses on diverse church, school, leadership, and community-organizing initiatives to improve life in Chicago neighborhoods. Participants will be challenged to examine perceptions of power, service and social action.
 
CSC 33975 (CBL) / THEO 33975 (CBL)
Poverty & Development in Chile
Holguin, Jimena
Credit Hours: 1
THEO 33975/CSC 33975 (1.0 credit) serves as the required orientation course for all students who will participate in the Approaches to Poverty and Development course offered through the Universidad Alberto Hurtado in Santiago, Chile as part of the Santiago study abroad program. The course will provide students with information regarding many of the themes and topics that will be explored further in the UAH course. This one-credit preparatory course will provide the necessary information to facilitate a richer and more meaningful experience while in Chile. Students must first be accepted into the Santiago semester abroad program through the Office of International Studies before being able to apply for this course.
 
CSC 33977 (CBL) / THEO 30047 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Hands of St. Andre
Credit Hours: 1
Marley Bonnichsen, Melissa 
This seminage (seminar/pilgrimage) will examine the life and spirit of St. Andre Bessette and the multiple ways in which humanity is impoverished (financial and spiritual). Students will have the opportunity to travel to Andre House in Phoenix AZ over fall break and bear witness to the Gospel and spirit of Brother Andre by serving the local community through the Andre hospitality houses, reflecting upon our own internal poverty through prayer and reflection, and engaging in a larger conversation around systemic poverty and the need for communal, internal, and societal healing.
 
CSC 33985 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Energy, Climate, and Social Change
Lantz, Kyle
Credit Hours: 1
This course will integrate the complex narratives surrounding energy policy and climate change and pursue questions about how these narratives integrate with social change. Students will explore the scientific, environmental, economic, geopolitical, and social implications of current energy technologies, climate adaptation policies, and how these affect the environment - understand as multifaceted in its definition (human life, water, animals, soil, air, etc.). The framing question for the course: How are people and communities affected by energy and climate policies? And, what sorts of efforts and opportunities are there for raising this question to the surface? The course will utilize selected readings, writing assignments, class lectures and discussions, a day long field trip to Chicago (tentative), and a week-long immersion in Washington, DC. During their time in D.C., students will learn to assess the strengths and weaknesses of alternative energy technologies (wind, solar, geothermal, fuel cells, ethanol, improving fossil fuel utilization, etc.), and of the various policies and economics surrounding energy and climate. During the week in Washington, D.C. students will identify the limitations of current energy policies and environmental regulation through visits to industry lobbying groups, policy makers and government officials, environmental organizations, and federal regulatory bodies. Finally, students will begin to understand the relationship between energy consumption and environmental ethics, especially as understood in Catholic social tradition.
 
CSC 33990 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Winter Service Learning
Mick, Connie; Marley Bonnichsen, Melissa 
Credit Hours: 1
Only for students who applied to and were accepted into a Winter Social Concerns Seminar and who study abroad that spring semester immediately following the winter immersion.
 
CSC 33991 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Recovering from Mental Illness through Work & Community
Brandenberger, Jay; Anderson, Lisa
Credit Hours: 1
While it is estimated that one in four adults experience some form of mental illness in any given year, the reality is that only 40% of those seek treatment. For those with serious mental illness, finding on-going support is crucial to their recovery, but difficult to find. The Clubhouse is an organization that promotes the recovery of adults living with serious mental illness by providing them with a welcoming community, meaningful work, and supported employment. This seminar will examine the US mental healthcare system and the Clubhouse model. Students will learn about these topics by reading relevant literature and meeting social workers, administrators, and people living with mental illness. In addition, students will actively participate in a week-long immersion experience by visiting the Carriage House in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, to observe and contribute to its daily operations and to meet members. This seminar is a one-credit hour course graded "Satisfactory" or "Unsatisfactory".
 
CSC 33997 (CBL) / CST 33997 (CBL) / PSY 33691 (CBL) / IIPS 33905 (CBL) / AMST 30812 (CBL) / HESB 30302 (CBL)
Rethinking Crime and Justice
Sharpe, Susan; Brandenberger, Jay; Kelly, Edward
Credit Hours: 3
What are the causes and costs of criminal behavior? How are people and communities affected by incarceration? How can we make our criminal justice system as good as it can be for all stakeholders? This course brings together students from both sides of the prison wall to explore issues including why people commit crime, what prisons are for, realities of prison life and reentry, effects of victimization, and restorative justice perspectives. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Together they examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of criminal justice policy, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities.
 
CSC 36991 (sec. 1 - sec. 4) (CBL/CBR/EL)
Directed Readings
Mick, Connie
Credit Hours: 1-3
Research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.
 
CSC 36992 (CBL/CBR/EL)
Directed Readings - SSLP
Sharpe, Sharpe
Credit Hours: 1-3
Research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.
 
CSC 60696 / THEO 60972
Common Good Institute: Jerusalem
Sandberg, Kevin
Credit Hours: 2
This immersion seminar to Jerusalem enables students to engage with Israelis and Palestinians over joint efforts to foster an adoption of the common good-a foundational principle of Catholic social teaching-as a principal means to overcome the violence, distrust, and enmity that plagues progress toward peace in the Middle East. While on immersion, students will meet with diverse groups, including NGO's and Church-based ministries in the Holy Land after having been prepared during pre-departure sessions that include an introduction to the histories, religions, literatures, and cultures of the peoples at the center of the conflicts. The course objective is to understand the notion of the common good as it functions in Israeli/Palestinian societies, and as it might facilitate reconciliation and peace as these can be construed interpersonally and internationally. Apply online via the Center for Social Concerns website: socialconcerns.nd.edu
 
CSC 63953 (EL)
Civic Engagement & Social Responsibility
Tomas Morgan, Rachel; Marley Bonnichsen, Melissa; Mick, Connie
Credit Hours: 1-3
This seminar allows graduate students to participate in an experiential learning opportunity designed to concentrate on civic engagement and social responsibility. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.
 
CSC 63955 (CBL) / CSLC 6300 (CBL)
Globalizing Perley
O’Conchubhair, Brian
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar allows graduate students to participate in an experiential learning opportunity designed to concentrate on civic engagement and social responsibility. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.

 

 

 

Center for Study of Language and Cultures

CSLC 6300 (CBL) / CSC 63955 (CBL)
Globalizing Perley
O’Conchubhair, Brian
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar allows graduate students to participate in an experiential learning opportunity designed to concentrate on civic engagement and social responsibility. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.

 

 

 

Institute for Latino  Studies

ILS 20913 (CBL) / ESS 30670 (CBL) / ROSP 30051 (CBL)
CBL Once Upon a Time
Parroquin, Rachel
Credit Hours: 3
Students will be introduced to Literatura Infantil y Juvenil (LIJ) in the Spanish-speaking world through a combination of considerable reading of LIJ across genres and levels and a critical perspective of LIJ via academic text and articles. Authors will include prolific writers of LIJ like Alma Flor Ada, as well as widely known writers like Cortazar, Paz, Perez Reverte, Poniatowska, and Vargas LLosa who have also begun writing children's books. Among genres read will be folklore, narrative, fiction (contemporary, realistic, historical, multicultural), fantasy, short story, poetry, and non-fiction. Students will also learn about various LIJ book awards and their evolution over time. In addition, students will develop criteria for evaluating quality LIJ. Finally, there is a Community-Based Learning (CBL) component where students will share LIJ with the local Latino community through CBL projects and/or a reading program with Latino youth. Pre-requiste: ROSP 20202 or above or placement by exam. This course can count as an advanced elective towards the major.
 
ILS 25911 (CBL) / ROSP 20810 (CBL)
CBL: Language, Culture, and Community
Coloma, Maria
Credit Hours: 3
This fifth-semester language and culture course is designed for students who want to improve their communication skills in Spanish and broaden their understanding of the Hispanic world through connecting with the local Spanish speaking community. Each section may focus on different topics, such as health care, education, social services, history of immigration, and intercultural competence. The course has a required Community-Based-Learning component in which students engage with the Latino community through placements in such areas as health care, youth mentoring or tutoring programs, English as a New Language (ENL) classes, and facilitating educational workshops with parents. In this course, students integrate their service experiences with the academic components of the class through readings, research, reflective writing, and discussion.
 
ILS 33701 (CBL) / CST 33458 (CBL) / SOC 33458 (CBL) / CSC 33458 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminars: Border Immersion
Beyerlein, Kraig
Credit Hours: 2
This seminar and experiential-learning course is broken into two parts. In the fall (for two credits), students will participate in a seminar that will expose them to various perspectives about immigration issues, especially those related to the Mexico-U.S. border. During our in-class meetings in the fall, (approximately 1 hr. & 40 min. per week), we will discuss scholarly and journalistic accounts of why migrants leave their home countries, the struggles they face during the journey, how U.S. citizens are responding, and possible policy solutions. In the spring (for one credit), students will participate in an immersion trip to the Southern Arizona borderlands during the first week of January and in follow-up classroom meetings (approximately 50 min. per week) during the spring semester to process the immersion experience. During the immersion trip, we will observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, be trained for and participate in humanitarian efforts, tour a Border Patrol and detention facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from faith leaders about their current and past border activism, and visit Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community. Throughout the course, particular focus will be given to the intersection of religion - especially Catholic Social Teachings - and border and immigration issues. To be eligible, students must complete an application, linked here:https://www3.nd.edu/~csc/application/sem_application.php?s=Fall&y=2017. Enrollment is competitive. The 15 available spots will be chosen based on the application responses, with preference given to those submitting earliest. Students will be notified about their status within a week of submitting the application. There are fees associated with this seminar (also see CSC website for information). This is a graded course. Department approval is required. [Note: Due to the overlap in content, students who have completed the one-credit version (CSC 33966/SOC 33066/ILS 30804/THEO 33966) cannot take this course.]
 
ILS 33800 (CBL) / THEO 33933 (CBL) / CSC 33933 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning (CCLP) (Chicago)
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 3
This is a leadership internship for Cross-cultural/Urban studies working 8 weeks in a multicultural area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will work with ILS to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved. Students will complete academic requirements including readings, reflection sessions, and a presentation of a synthesis paper at the end of the internship. Application and interview necessary for participation.
 
ILS 40910 / AFST 43575 / ROSP 40876 
Race & Ethnicity in U.S.
Moreno, Marisel
Credit Hours: 4
If something has become clear following the recent termination of Mexican-American studies courses by the Tucson Unified School District (AZ) is that race and ethnicity matter when considering the condition of Latinos/as in the US. In this course students will begin by examining the events related to the AZ law and will explore how these issues are played out in Latino literature and our local Latino community. Literature by Afro-Latina/o, Andean-Latina/o (and other Latinos of indigenous descent), and Asian-Latina/o authors will provide a lens through which to explore the racial and ethnic complexities that are erased by the umbrella term "Latino." Tutoring/mentoring at La Casa de Amistad will provide an opportunity for students to see the issues studied at work in the "real world," while also fostering stronger ties between Notre Dame and the South Bend community. For the Community-Based Learning segment of the course, students will spend two hours per week volunteering and will participate in a local immersion weekend. This course will be conducted in Spanish. Spanish heritage speakers are welcome.
 
ILS 41103 (CBL) / AMST 41402 (CBL) / HESB 40110 (CBL) / ESS 45653 (CBL) / GSC 41103 (CBL) / LLRO 31883 (CBL) / ANTH 41103 (CBL)
Service Mexican Immigration
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 1
This one credit course complements the classroom course, Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case study for students who wish to extend their learning through service in the community. (Enrollment in the classroom course is a requirement, but students in the classroom course are not required to add this course.) Students will volunteer as tutors, interpreters, translators, assistants and teachers at local organizations, clinics, law offices and community agencies. The schedules for service will vary accordingly.
 
ILS 43103 (CBR/CBL) / ESS 45652 (CBR/CBL) / AMST 40402 (CBR/CBL) / ANTH 43305 (CBR/CBL) / GSC 43103 (CBR/CBL) / HESB 40108 (CBR/CBL) / LLRO 30883 (CBR/CBL) / IDS 43270 43270 (CBR/CBL)
Mexican Immigration
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.

 

 

 

Institute for International Peace Studies

IIPS 20101(CBL)
Introduction to Peace Studies
Cortright, David or Lopez, George
Credit Hours: 3
Although the Cold War ended in 1989, civil war, genocide and state repression continue to occur across the globe, while millions barely have the means to survive in the face of overwhelming poverty. Nevertheless, we have also witnessed the emergence of sophisticated civil society networks and social movements to address these challenges, as well as governmental and transnational institutions committed to promoting justice and peace in the aftermath of political violence. This course is designed to introduce students to the various ways scholars and activists define peace and the challenges faced in securing peace. This course surveys: (1) the major causes of direct and structural violence; (2) various definitions of "peace" and the conditions under which it occurs and is sustained; and (3) the comparative success of various strategies such as building peace movements and promoting nonviolent social change.
 
IIPS 20729 (CBL) / THEO 20643 (CBL) / CST 20643 (CBL)
The Askesis of Nonviolence
Pfeil, Margaret
Credit Hours: 3
This course will explore the theology and practice of nonviolence as a form of askesis, or spiritual discipline. The material will include readings from Scripture, the early Christian tradition, and Catholic social teaching. Religious sources outside the Christian tradition will include Gandhi, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Badshah Khan. This course will use the method of community-based learning and will require 20 hours of service at particular sites in the South Bend area.
 
IIPS 30304 (CBL/CBR) / STV 20603 (CBL/CBR) / KSGA 40200 (CBL/CBR) / MGA 40806 (CBL/CBR) / ANTH 40200 (CBL/CBR) / IDS 40830 (CBL/CBR) / SOC 40200 (CBL/CBR)
Visualizing Global Change
Kay, Tamara
Credit Hours: 3
The goal of the course is to compare the processes by which social scientists and filmmakers/photographers engage in social documentation. Students explore how global social problems such as rural and urban poverty, race and gender inequalities, immigration, and violence are analyzed across the social sciences, and depicted in a variety of documentary film and photography genres. The course also explores the role that documentary photography and film play in promoting rights and advocating for social change, particularly in the realm of human rights and global inequality. It examines the history of documentary film and photography in relationship to politics, and to the development of concerns across the social sciences with inequality and social justice. It also looks at how individual documentarians, non-profit organizations and social movements use film and photography to further their goals and causes, and issues of representation their choices raise. The course is also unique because it requires students to engage in the process of visual documentation themselves by incorporating an activity-based learning component. For their final project, students choose a human rights or social problem that concerns or interests them (and which they can document locally, no travel is required), prepare a documentary exhibit on the chosen topic (10-12 photographs), and write a 12-15 page paper analyzing how 2-3 social scientists construct and frame the given problem. Students also have the option to produce a short documentary film.
 
IIPS 30924 / CST 30505 (CBL) / MGTO 30510 (CBL) / HESB 30303 (CBL)
Social Entrepreneurship
Hurst, Charlice
Credit Hours: 3
Social Entrepreneurship (formerly MicroVenturing I) explores the innovative concepts, practices and strategies associated with building, sustaining, and replicating social impact organizations in less developed countries (LDCs) and here in the United States. Many dynamic organizations are aspiring to a "double" or "triple bottom line" - beneficial human impact, environmental sustainability, and profitability. This course exposes students to a new and growing trend in leadership, venture creation, product design, and service delivery which uses the basic entrepreneurial template to transform the landscape of both for-profit and not-for-profit ventures. In addition, students will analyze various social enterprise business models, including microfinance, microenterprise development, bottom of the pyramid, etc., and will devise strategies and tactics to improve the efficacy of these ventures, as well as engage in research seeking to advance the field of social enterprise at Notre Dame.
 
IIPS 33905 (CBL) / AMST 30812 (CBL) / CSC 33997 (CBL) / CST 33997 (CBL) / PSY 33691 (CBL) / HESB 30302 (CBL)
Rethinking Crime and Justice
Sharpe, Susan; Brandenberger, Jay; Kelly, Edward
Credit Hours: 3
What are the causes and costs of criminal behavior? How are people and communities affected by incarceration? How can we make our criminal justice system as good as it can be for all stakeholders? This course brings together students from both sides of the prison wall to explore issues including why people commit crime, what prisons are for, realities of prison life and reentry, effects of victimization, and restorative justice perspectives. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Together they examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of criminal justice policy, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities.

 

SUPPLEMENTARY MAJORS, MINORS, AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS

 

 

 

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TRADITION

CST 20625 (CBL) / THEO 20625 (CBL)
Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice
Pfeil, Margaret
Credit Hours: 3
This course is designed for students who have completed a Summer Service Project Internship (SSLP or ISSLP) or Social Enterprise Microfinance Internship (SEMI). It affords students the opportunity to re-engage their immersion experiences. Students will employ tools of social analysis, theological reflection, and rhetoric relative to both topics such as hunger, homelessness, poverty, incarceration, and immigration, and themes such as freedom, solidarity, mimesis, power, and the preferential option for the poor. The goal of the course is to develop a theology of discipleship to which justice is integral, including considerations of worship, sustainability, social reconciliation and restorative justice.
 
CST 20643 (CBL) / THEO 20643 (CBL) / IIPS 20729 (CBL)
The Askesis of Nonviolence
Pfeil, Margaret
Credit Hours: 3
This course will explore the theology and practice of nonviolence as a form of askesis, or spiritual discipline. The material will include readings from Scripture, the early Christian tradition, and Catholic social teaching. Religious sources outside the Christian tradition will include Gandhi, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Badshah Khan. This course will use the method of community-based learning and will require 20 hours of service at particular sites in the South Bend area.
 
CST 23470 (CBL) / THEO 30350 (sec. 1 & sec. 3) (CBL) / SUS 20350 (CBL)
Sustainability at Notre Dame
Pfeil, Margaret
Credit Hours: 2
This course will address sustainability in the context of the local academic community and its institutions. In light of the recent papal encyclical, Laudato Si', On Care for Our Common Home, this course will provide students interdisciplinary opportunities to explore the challenges of sustainability and to develop collaborative strategies for making our common campus homes more sustainable. This course will be offered concurrently at ND, SMC, and HCC, and will be co-taught by faculty from all three campuses. It will meet in rotation on each of the three campuses once per week for two hours. Students will be invited to examine the course materials in conversation with the mission of the Congregation of Holy Cross through immersion at each of the campuses and encounters with the sisters, brothers, and priests of Holy Cross and with sustainability professionals.
 
CST 30505 (CBL) / MGTO 30510 (CBL) / HESB 30303 (CBL) / IIPS 30924 (CBL)
Social Entrepreneurship
Hurst, Charlice
Credit Hours: 3
Social Entrepreneurship (formerly MicroVenturing I) explores the innovative concepts, practices and strategies associated with building, sustaining, and replicating social impact organizations in less developed countries (LDCs) and here in the United States. Many dynamic organizations are aspiring to a "double" or "triple bottom line" - beneficial human impact, environmental sustainability, and profitability. This course exposes students to a new and growing trend in leadership, venture creation, product design, and service delivery which uses the basic entrepreneurial template to transform the landscape of both for-profit and not-for-profit ventures. In addition, students will analyze various social enterprise business models, including microfinance, microenterprise development, bottom of the pyramid, etc., and will devise strategies and tactics to improve the efficacy of these ventures, as well as engage in research seeking to advance the field of social enterprise at Notre Dame.
 
CST 33458 (CBL) / SOC 33458 (CBL) / ILS 33701 (CBL) / CSC 33458 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminars: Border Immersion
Beyerlein, Kraig
Credit Hours: 2
This seminar and experiential-learning course is broken into two parts. In the fall (for two credits), students will participate in a seminar that will expose them to various perspectives about immigration issues, especially those related to the Mexico-U.S. border. During our in-class meetings in the fall, (approximately 1 hr. & 40 min. per week), we will discuss scholarly and journalistic accounts of why migrants leave their home countries, the struggles they face during the journey, how U.S. citizens are responding, and possible policy solutions. In the spring (for one credit), students will participate in an immersion trip to the Southern Arizona borderlands during the first week of January and in follow-up classroom meetings (approximately 50 min. per week) during the spring semester to process the immersion experience. During the immersion trip, we will observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, be trained for and participate in humanitarian efforts, tour a Border Patrol and detention facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from faith leaders about their current and past border activism, and visit Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community. Throughout the course, particular focus will be given to the intersection of religion - especially Catholic Social Teachings - and border and immigration issues. To be eligible, students must complete an application. Enrollment is competitive. The 15 available spots will be chosen based on the application responses, with preference given to those submitting earliest. Students will be notified about their status within a week of submitting the application. There are fees associated with this seminar (also see CSC website for information). This is a graded course. Department approval is required. [Note: Due to the overlap in content, students who have completed the one-credit version (CSC 33966/SOC 33066/ILS 30804/THEO 33966) cannot take this course.]
 
THEO 33965 / CSC 33965 / CST 33965
Social Concerns: Organizing Power & Hope
Marley Bonnichsen, Melissa; Caponigro, Jerome
Credit Hours: 1
This seminar focuses on diverse church, school, leadership, and community-organizing initiatives to improve life in Chicago neighborhoods. Participants will be challenged to examine perceptions of power, service and social action.
 
CST 33997 (CBL) / AMST 30812 (CBL) / CSC 33997 (CBL) / PSY 33691 (CBL) / IIPS 33905 (CBL) / HESB 30302 (CBL)
Rethinking Crime and Justice
Sharpe, Susan; Brandenberger, Jay; Kelly, Edward
Credit Hours: 3
What are the causes and costs of criminal behavior? How are people and communities affected by incarceration? How can we make our criminal justice system as good as it can be for all stakeholders? This course brings together students from both sides of the prison wall to explore issues including why people commit crime, what prisons are for, realities of prison life and reentry, effects of victimization, and restorative justice perspectives. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Together they examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of criminal justice policy, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities.

 

 

 

EDUCATION

EDU 75630 (CBL)
Internship & Practice I
Dallavis, Christian; Garcia, April; Watson, William; Zelenka, Michael
Credit Hours: 2
This course engages candidates in the application and implementation of the skills and concepts of the domains of school culture, instructional leadership and executive management. Participants are given opportunities to gain leadership experience within the context of their school. As part of this course, candidates complete a leadership internship at their school, increasing their leadership capacity while receiving guided support from their instructors through performance assessments designed to deepen their professional growth and develop best practices as school leaders. Participants will also receive direct support from their on-site supervisor and regular mentoring from experienced professionals in the field.
 
EDU 75632 (CBR)
Inquiry & Intervention I
Sorkin, David; Dallavis, Christian; Morten, Sandria; Wyttenbach, Melodie
Credit Hours: 2
This course requires candidates to Participants identify and address a particular challenge facing their school related to student achievement. Over the course of the second year, candidates will use methods from the field of action research to identify an issue, research the literature and best practice, devise an intervention, collect data, conduct an analysis of the findings, and prepare a recommendation for school leaders.

 

 

 

EDUCATION, SCHOOLING, AND SOCIETY

ESS 20203 (CBL) / AFST 20703 (CBL) / SOC 20033 (CBL) / HESB 20220 (CBL)
Intro to Social Problems
Williams, Richard
Credit Hours: 3
Analysis of selected problems in American society such as crime, narcotic addiction, alcoholism, delinquency, racial and ethnic conflict, prostitution, and others. Discussions, debates, films, tapes, and readings.
 
ESS 30401 (CBL) / ENGL 20023 (CBL)
Writing Center Theory and Practice
Capdevielle, Matthew
Credit Hours: 3
A three-credit course in writing pedagogy for students working as tutors in the University Writing Center.
 
ESS 30611 (CBL)
Tutoring in the Community
Masters, Nancy
Credit Hours: 1
ESS 30611 is a one credit seminar for students who are tutoring in the South Bend community. This seminar will provide tutors with an opportunity to explore the social, economic, and cultural forces that influence the lives of their students. Tutoring in the Community will give tutors the tools they need to analyze beliefs and pedagogy, improve instruction, and foster development in South Bend school children in need.
 
ESS 30629 (CBR) / CNST 30405 (CBR) / HESB 30405 (CBR)
Early Childhood Ed Policy
Fulcher-Dawson, Rachel
Credit Hours: 3
This course covers the various issues relevant to the current early childhood education landscape. This includes theories of early learning and child development, policy development in the United States, the issues of inequality and the achievement gap (particularly related to K-12 Education Reform) and research on interventions or "what works" in early childhood programming. The advantage to understanding the theories of child development, the policy context and the intervention research is that it gives future teachers and future policymakers a foundational premise upon which to grow, analyze, learn and teach. Topics covered will include: Theories of Child Development (Infant Schools to Present), Head Start and the CCDBG, State Preschool, Inequality and the Achievement Gap in the Early Years and Interventions in Early Childhood (HighScope/Perry Preschool, Abecedarian and Chicago Parent Studies, Head Start Research). The goal of this class is to come away with a greater understanding of the language, the history, the goals and the possibilities in this policy area as well as its connections to other social welfare programs and to K-12 schooling. Students will become more fluent in the language of early childhood education and will gain the foundational knowledge of past and current theories, laws, policies and educational interventions.
 
ESS 30670 (CBL) / ROSP 30051 (CBL) / ILS 20913 (CBL)
CBL Once Upon a Time
Parroquin, Rachel
Credit Hours: 3
Students will be introduced to Literatura Infantil y Juvenil (LIJ) in the Spanish-speaking world through a combination of considerable reading of LIJ across genres and levels and a critical perspective of LIJ via academic text and articles. Authors will include prolific writers of LIJ like Alma Flor Ada, as well as widely known writers like Cortazar, Paz, Perez Reverte, Poniatowska, and Vargas LLosa who have also begun writing children's books. Among genres read will be folklore, narrative, fiction (contemporary, realistic, historical, multicultural), fantasy, short story, poetry, and non-fiction. Students will also learn about various LIJ book awards and their evolution over time. In addition, students will develop criteria for evaluating quality LIJ. Finally, there is a Community-Based Learning (CBL) component where students will share LIJ with the local Latino community through CBL projects and/or a reading program with Latino youth. Pre-requiste: ROSP 20202 or above or placement by exam. This course can count as an advanced elective towards the major.
 
ESS 33627 (CBL) / PSY 33643 (CBL)
CBL: Literacy Development and Children
Christensen, Andrea
Credit Hours: 3
For students who wish to integrate theory, practice, and empirical evidence in children's learning, this course combines community-based service learning and research. Students will meet 75 minutes/week on campus to discuss readings on topics including service learning, mentoring, children's learning and development, and research methods. In addition, students will spend at least two hours/week (3-4 p.m., two weekday afternoons [M/W or T/R] for a total of approximately 25 hours) working one-on-one with an elementary school child in a local after-school literacy program. Students will keep a journal with entries for each visit with their child, and they will conduct research comparing instructional techniques, materials, or behavioral management methods. Finally, students will integrate the theory and evidence from course material with their service experience and research findings. This seminar is offered only in the fall; however, students will be encouraged to continue their service to the after-school program during the spring semester through a 1-credit ESS service-learning option. *Please note: students may need to provide their own transportation to/from the after-school program site, though every effort will be made to carpool or to include sites that are within walking distance of campus.
 
ESS 33633 (CBL)
CBL: Literacy at the Library
Morrell, Jodene
Credit Hours: 3
This community based learning course provides an opportunity for students to participate in the co-construction of two communities: (1) as literacy tutors at the main branch of the St. Joseph County Public Library (SJCPL) and (2) as members of the research team (students enrolled in the course) on campus. We will meet 75 minutes/week on campus to discuss readings related to literacy instruction and ethnographic qualitative research methods. Students will also spend up to two hours per week (M-TH; day to be determined based on students? schedules) at the SJCPL working with one to two children. Students will develop an extensive understanding of evidence-based best practices in literacy instruction (Gambrell & Morrow, 2015) for elementary aged children to provide weekly tutoring and guide children in literacy focused project-based learning (Dewey, 1938). Students will also develop knowledge and skills as qualitative ethnographic researchers to contribute to the development of programming at the library to best serve the literacy needs and interests of the children and families in the community. The semester will conclude with a presentation of individual and team research findings and a mini-conference with the children to share their projects with the wider community. Our work will be framed by a Vygotskian sociocultural theory of learning, align with Catholic Social Teaching, and maintain a mutually beneficial relationship with the SJCPL and the families it serves.
 
ESS 40531 / THEO 40874
Intro to Catechesis
O’Malley, Timothy
Credit Hours: 3
This course provides an introduction to the historical, theoretical, and practical foundations to the art of catechesis both in parishes and in Catholic schools. Students in the course will become acquainted with historical models of catechesis from the patristic era to the present. They will study the theological, pastoral, cultural, and pedagogical foundations of catechesis relative to both parishes and schools through attention to ecclesial documents, as well as works of catechetical theory. Lastly, students will have an occasion to practice the art of catechesis through involvement in a parish or school setting. This class is affiliated with the outreach of the McGrath Institute for Church Life in catechesis. It is important for those who are interested in teaching in a Catholic school or developing capacities to do catechesis in a pastoral setting either professionally or personally.
 
ESS 43640 (sec. 1- sec. 3) (CBR)
Seminar Educational Research
Christensen, Andrea
Credit Hours: 3
Students will learn about both methods and topics in educational research. Students will design and execute an original research study.
 
ESS 45652 (CBR/CBL) / AMST 40402 (CBR/CBL) / ILS 43103 (CBR/CBL) / ANTH 43305 (CBR/CBL) / GSC 43103 (CBR/CBL) / HESB 40108 (CBR/CBL) / LLRO 30883 (CBR/CBL) / IDS 43270 43270 (CBR/CBL)
Mexican Immigration
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.
 
ESS 45653 (CBL) / AMST 41402 (CBL) / ILS 41103 (CBL) / HESB 40110 (CBL) / GSC 41103 (CBL) / LLRO 31883 (CBL) / ANTH 41103 (CBL)
Service Mexican Immigration
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 1
This one-credit course complements the classroom course, Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case study for students who wish to extend their learning through service in the community. (Enrollment in the classroom course is a requirement, but students in the classroom course are not required to add this course.) Students will volunteer as tutors, interpreters, translators, assistants and teachers at local organizations, clinics, law offices and community agencies. The schedules for service will vary accordingly.

 

 

 

HESBURGH PROGRAM IN PUBLIC SERVICE

HESB 20220 (CBL) / AFST 20703 (CBL) / SOC 20033 (CBL) / ESS 20203 (CBL)
Intro to Social Problems
Williams, Richard
Credit Hours: 3
Analysis of selected problems in American society such as crime, narcotic addiction, alcoholism, delinquency, racial and ethnic conflict, prostitution, and others. Discussions, debates, films, tapes, and readings.

 

HESB 30302 (CBL) / AMST 30812 (CBL) / CSC 33997 (CBL) / CST 33997 (CBL) / PSY 33691 (CBL) / IIPS 33905 (CBL)
Rethinking Crime and Justice
Sharpe, Susan; Brandenberger, Jay; Kelly, Edward
Credit Hours: 3
What are the causes and costs of criminal behavior? How are people and communities affected by incarceration? How can we make our criminal justice system as good as it can be for all stakeholders? This course brings together students from both sides of the prison wall to explore issues including why people commit crime, what prisons are for, realities of prison life and reentry, effects of victimization, and restorative justice perspectives. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Together they examine myths and realities related to crime and to punishment, explore the effects of criminal justice policy, and develop ideas for responding more effectively to crime in our communities.
 
HESB 30303 (CBL) / CST 30505 (CBL) / MGTO 30510 (CBL) / IIPS 30924 (CBL)
Social Entrepreneurship
Hurst, Charlice
Credit Hours: 3
Social Entrepreneurship (formerly MicroVenturing I) explores the innovative concepts, practices and strategies associated with building, sustaining, and replicating social impact organizations in less developed countries (LDCs) and here in the United States. Many dynamic organizations are aspiring to a "double" or "triple bottom line" - beneficial human impact, environmental sustainability, and profitability. This course exposes students to a new and growing trend in leadership, venture creation, product design, and service delivery which uses the basic entrepreneurial template to transform the landscape of both for-profit and not-for-profit ventures. In addition, students will analyze various social enterprise business models, including microfinance, microenterprise development, bottom of the pyramid, etc., and will devise strategies and tactics to improve the efficacy of these ventures, as well as engage in research seeking to advance the field of social enterprise at Notre Dame.

 

HESB 30595 (CBR) / CNST 30405 (CBR) / ESS 30629 (CBR)
Early Childhood Ed Policy
Fulcher-Dawson, Rachel
Credit Hours: 3
This course covers the various issues relevant to the current early childhood education landscape. This includes theories of early learning and child development, policy development in the United States, the issues of inequality and the achievement gap (particularly related to K-12 Education Reform) and research on interventions or "what works" in early childhood programming. The advantage to understanding the theories of child development, the policy context and the intervention research is that it gives future teachers and future policymakers a foundational premise upon which to grow, analyze, learn and teach. Topics covered will include: Theories of Child Development (Infant Schools to Present), Head Start and the CCDBG, State Preschool, Inequality and the Achievement Gap in the Early Years and Interventions in Early Childhood (HighScope/Perry Preschool, Abecedarian and Chicago Parent Studies, Head Start Research). The goal of this class is to come away with a greater understanding of the language, the history, the goals and the possibilities in this policy area as well as its connections to other social welfare programs and to K-12 schooling. Students will become more fluent in the language of early childhood education and will gain the foundational knowledge of past and current theories, laws, policies and educational interventions.
 
HESB 34092 (CBL)
Foundations of Public Policy - Public Policy Visits
Kellenberg, Thomas
Credit Hours: 3
Public Policy visits. This course is taken in conjunction with HESB 34091 "Foundations Of Public Policy." 
 
HESB 34093 (CBL)
Washington DC Internship
Kellenberg, Thomas
Credit Hours: 3
While in Washington, all students participate in experiential education through an internship. Internships are selected and secured by the students, with the assistance of the ND campus director of the Washington Program and the ND Career Center. 
 
 
HESB 40108 (CBR/CBL) / AMST 40402 (CBR/CBL) / ILS 43103 (CBR/CBL) / ESS 45652 (CBR/CBL) / ANTH 43305 (CBR/CBL) / GSC 43103 (CBR/CBL) / LLRO 30883 (CBR/CBL) / IDS 43270 43270 (CBR/CBL)
Mexican Immigration
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 3
This course uses experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. The course begins with readings in social science and fiction about transnationalism, Mexican-U.S. migration and the history and sociology of the local community. Next we learn ethical fieldwork methods in preparation for community research. Students working in two-person teams will gather data on local and transnational households and kin networks, gender relations, political involvement, employment, consumption practices, cultural activities and religious life, working through contacts with social service agencies, the Mexican consulate, and Mexican- or Latino-run media, businesses, food stores, and sports leagues. We will document the innovative adaptations of this migrant community, especially the growth of an ethnic enclave of small businesses that both unite Mexicans as an ethnic group and sustain their ties to their homeland. We intend to compile the research in a volume published by Latino Studies to be given to those who shared their lives with us and to entities that are committed to helping them.
 
HESB 40110 (CBL) / AMST 41402 (CBL) / ILS 41103 (CBL) / ESS 45653 (CBL) / GSC 41103 (CBL) / LLRO 31883 (CBL) / ANTH 41103 (CBL)
Service Mexican Immigration
Richman, Karen
Credit Hours: 1
This one-credit course complements the classroom course, Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case study for students who wish to extend their learning through service in the community. (Enrollment in the classroom course is a requirement, but students in the classroom course are not required to add this course.) Students will volunteer as tutors, interpreters, translators, assistants and teachers at local organizations, clinics, law offices and community agencies. The schedules for service will vary accordingly.

 

 

 

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

IDS 30513 (CBL) / GH 60595 (CBL)
International Development in Practice
Reifenberg, Stephen
Credit Hours: 3
This class aspires to develop relevant knowledge and practical skills for students interested in engaging in positive change in a complex world. In this course on international development, students will: 1) examine the processes that bring about individual and societal change in an international context;2) explore the roles, complexities, opportunities and constraints of development projects in areas such as poverty reduction, social development, health and education; and, 3) develop practical skills related to project design, planning, management, negotiations, communications, and the evaluation of international development projects. A central theme of the course is to understand what have we learned over the past decades from systematic research and from experience in the field about "what works." The course makes use of cases studies and draws lessons from instructive stories of failure as well as inspirational stories of change. The course focuses significant attention on "bright spots" in development- specific interventions that have made meaningful contributions. The course aspires to help train students to think like creative, effective, and thoughtful development professionals. A central feature of the course will be the opportunity to work throughout the semester as a member of a "Development Advisory Team" directly with an international development organization client who has identified a specific problem or opportunity. Development clients for the class are organizations in Bangladesh, Chile, Haiti, and India, among others.
 
IDS 40900 (CBL/EL) / DESN 40100  (CBL/EL)
VCD 8: Social Design
Verma, Neeta
Credit Hours: 3
VCD1 (DESN 20101) is recommended, but not required MATERIALS FEE. This advanced course in visual communication illustrates how design can make a demonstrable difference by informing and educating the public. Class projects focus on design's ability to affect positive social change. The class also benefits students who intend to pursue the field of graphic design after graduation, preparing them both creatively and technically for professional practice by focusing on research-based assignments. These projects will allow students to address various issues affecting contemporary society while simultaneously building their portfolio.

 

 

 

POVERTY STUDIES

PS 33400 (CBL) / AFST 33706 (CBL) / ENGL 20171 (CBL) / GSC 33656 (CBL) / HESB 33103 (CBL)
Rhetorics of Gender and Poverty
Mick, Connie
Credit Hours: 3
This course explores the rhetorical history and dynamics of what has been called the feminization of poverty, comparing statistics and stories in scholarly and popular media that often tell conflicting narratives of who is poor and why. We will ask how the picture of poverty has evolved over time exploring such representations as: Dorothea Lange's 1936 documentary photograph of the Migrant Mother, Ronald Reagan's 1976 caricature of the Welfare Queen, the 2008 film Slumdog Millionaire, and Katherine Boo's 2012 book Behind the Beautiful Forevers. What does poverty look like in modern media (news, books, films, theatre, etc.)? Who gets to tell that story? How can we contribute to that conversation? To what extent do these representations not only reflect but shape public opinion and public policy? These questions will be grounded in theories and research on the intersection of gender, poverty, race, and rhetoric. They will also be framed by students' original community-based research supported by local community partners whose social service addresses gender and poverty. Community engagement time is limited and flexible. Final projects may be composed as traditional research or creative works.
 
PS 35002 (CBR/EL)
Experiential Learning-Internship
Mick, Connie
Credit Hours: 1-3
Students electing to fulfill the experiential learning requirement through internships in the community (Option B) may do so by enrolling in PS 35002. Students must complete 3 credits total, but may do so in one, two, or three separate internships with corresponding credit, enrolling in PS 35002 each semester they are participating in an internship, or in the Fall semester if the internship takes place over the summer. Students will determine credit value with their internship advisor and a Poverty Studies director. For 3 credits, a student must complete 80 to 100 hours total during one semester or approximately 8 to 10 hours per week for 10 weeks, including time at the site and with the internship advisor. A 2-credit internship requires 50 to 70 total hours (or 5-7 hours for 10 weeks) and a 1-credit internship would involve 30 to 50 total hours (or 3-5 hours for 10 weeks). Students may arrange to intern for more or less than 10 weeks during the semester they are enrolled in PS 35002 and can adjust the weekly hours to correspond to the required total.
 
PS 43000 (CBR)
Capstone Seminar
Warlick, Jennifer
Credit hours: 3
The Capstone Seminar will be topic-oriented drawing on literature from multiple disciplines. The students themselves will be from different majors and will share both the perspectives of their major disciplines as well as their varied experiences in the field thus ensuring that interdisciplinary nature of the inquiry. Experts with diverse perspectives and professional experiences will join the seminar as special guests.

 

 

 

SUSTAINABILITY

SUS 20350 (CBL) / CST 23470 (CBL) / THEO 30350 (sec. 1 & sec. 3) (CBL)
Sustainability at Notre Dame
Pfeil, Margaret
Credit Hours: 2
This course will address sustainability in the context of the local academic community and its institutions. In light of the recent papal encyclical, Laudato Si', On Care for Our Common Home, this course will provide students interdisciplinary opportunities to explore the challenges of sustainability and to develop collaborative strategies for making our common campus homes more sustainable. This course will be offered concurrently at ND, SMC, and HCC, and will be co-taught by faculty from all three campuses. It will meet in rotation on each of the three campuses once per week for two hours. Students will be invited to examine the course materials in conversation with the mission of the Congregation of Holy Cross through immersion at each of the campuses and encounters with the sisters, brothers, and priests of Holy

 

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Upcoming Events

January 2019

15
16
Information Session: Spring 2019 Social Concerns Seminars
Wednesday, January 16, 2019 - 4:00pm
17
Information Session: SSLP
Thursday, January 17, 2019 - 5:00pm to 5:30pm
23
2019 Social Concerns Fair
Wednesday, January 23, 2019 - 6:00pm to 8:00pm

March 2019

21
Pre-Conference Workshop: Restorative Justice on Catholic Campuses
Thursday, March 21, 2019 - 12:30pm to 4:00pm
21
2019 Catholic Social Tradition Conference
Thursday, March 21, 2019 - 7:00pm to 9:00pm
22
2019 Catholic Social Tradition Conference
Friday, March 22, 2019 - 7:30am to 9:30pm
23
2019 Catholic Social Tradition Conference
Saturday, March 23, 2019 - 8:00am to 4:30pm

April 2019

05
Been & Seen Series
Friday, April 5, 2019 - 12:00pm to 1:00pm

June 2019

04
Community Engagement Faculty Institute
Tuesday, June 4, 2019 (All day) to Thursday, June 6, 2019 (All day)