Pizza, Pop, & Politics: Peer to Peer Politics

Wednesday, April 24, 2019 - 5:00pm

 

Join ND Votes in the final Pizza, Pop, and Politics discussion of the semester as we feature three political science majors who will share their senior thesis research with their peers.

Soren Hansen will present her analysis of “Girl Power: A Tocquevillian Analysis of the Crisis of Gender Among Millennials.”

Abstract: In his sweeping analysis of the American republic, Alexis de Tocqueville attributed “the singular prosperity and growing strength of that people” to “the superiority of their women.” Beginning with an examination of Tocqueville’s own writings on women and gender in Democracy in America and applying his method of analysis to contemporary society, this project is a Tocquevillian one focused on analyzing the particular roles of gender, power, and women in the American political regime from the nineteenth century to today.

Prathm Juneja will discuss his research on “The Interstate Voter Registration Crosscheck Program and its Impact on Voter Turnout.”

Abstract: In 2005, the Kansas Secretary of State's Office created the Interstate Voter Registration Crosscheck Program (Crosscheck) as a means for states to collaborate on voter roll maintenance procedures. Despite membership from twenty-eight states, academic work on Crosscheck has only studied its false-positive rate and algorithmic biases. In my thesis, I study the potential impact of Crosscheck use on voter turnout rates, and whether its inaccuracy has an effect on elections.Jenna Wilson will speak on her thesis, “Going Alone or Going Along? A Study of the Competing Theories of Voting Motivation.”

Jenna Wilson will speak on her thesis, “Going Alone or Going Along? A Study of the Competing Theories of Voting Motivation”

Abstract: What motivates an individual to turn out to vote? I studied two competing theories of voting motivation: the “tipping the balance” theory, which argues that an individual votes to impact the outcome of an election and the “following the herd” theory, which argues that an individual turns out to vote due to social pressure. I conducted an original survey experiment where I pitted these two theories against one another, ultimately concluding that younger voters are more likely to vote to impact the outcome of an election, while older voters are more likely to vote due to social pressure.

Location:

Geddes Hall, Coffee House

Scheduled event for: 
Add to Calendar 04/24/2019 17:00:00 America/Indiana/Indianapolis Pizza, Pop, & Politics: Peer to Peer Politics   Join ND Votes in the final Pizza, Pop, and Politics discussion of the semester as we feature https://socialconcerns.nd.edu/events/pizza-pop-politics-peer-peer-politics
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