Community-Based Course Guide

Community-Based Course Opportunities

The Center for Social Concerns offers the following kinds of community-based courses:

Experiential Learning (EL) classes put students in direct contact with some aspect of the issues being studied in their coursework. The off-campus area offers sites for learning, but students don't necessarily engage in service.

Community-Based Learning (CBL) courses give students the opportunity to contribute to the community beyond the campus. Their experiences are integrated into class like a reading assignment, providing them with an additional text for consideration during class discussions and in written assignments.

Community-Based Research (CBR) involves students in an investigation of a question of concern to a non-profit community organization. The results of the study are intended to assist the organization.

Spring Semester 2016 COURSE INDEX

Click on department name to view departmental course listings and descriptions.

 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS

AFRICANA STUDIES

AFST 43700 (CBL) Youth Empowerment, Literacy, and the Changing Urban Landscapes

AMERICAN STUDIES

AMST 13184 (CBL) History University Seminar: Sanctity and Society

AMST 30465 (CBL) Youth Empowerment, Literacy, and the Changing Urban Landscapes

AMST 30467 (CBL) History of American Indian Education: Sociology, Race, Class, Gender, and Schooling

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 34320 (CBL) Introduction to Ireland

  • Dublin Program / International

ARTS AND LETTERS (NON-DEPARTMENTAL)

AL 24006 (CBL) Memories and History

  • Toledo Program / International

AL 34002 (CBL) Toledo Internship

  • Toledo Program / International

ART, ART HISTORY AND DESIGN

ARHI 13182 (CBL) Fine Arts University Seminar

DESN 60201 (CBL/CBR) Collaborative Product Development

HISTORY

HIST 33613 (CBL) History of American Indian Education: Sociology, Race, Class, Gender, and Schooling

HIST 34430 (CBL) Introduction to Ireland

  • Dublin Program / International

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

LAST 34550 (CBL) Approaches to Poverty and Development

  • Santiago Program / International

MUSIC

MUS 20691 (CBL) Wind & Percussion Pedagogy

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 35901 (CBL/EL) Internships

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 23097 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar:  Engaging Resilience: A Lifespan Perspective on Human Potential

PSY 23271 (CBL) Autism Spectrum Disorder Practicum

PSY 23852 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Community

PSY 23855 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten

PSY 43271 (CBL) Autism Spectrum Disorder Practicum

PSY 44272 (CBL) Developmental Disabilities: Integrating Theory & Practice

  • London Program / International

ROMANCE LANGUAGES

LLRO 34600 (CBL) All Roads Lead to Rome 

  • Rome Program / International

ROMANCE LANGUAGES—FRENCH

ROFR 34910 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Women of Loire Valley from the Middle Ages through the 20th Century

  • Angers Program / International

ROMANCE LANGUAGES—SPANISH

ROSP 20201 (sec. 1-9) (CBL) Intermediate Spanish I

ROSP 20202 (sec. 1-9) (CBL) Intermediate Spanish II

ROSP 20237 (sec. 1-4) (CBL) Conversation and Writing

ROSP 20460 (sec. 2 & 3) (EL) Spanish for the Medical Profession

ROSP 20810 (CBL) Community-Based Spanish: Language, Culture, and Community

ROSP 27500 (CBL) Approaches to Hispanic Culture through Writing

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 20033 (CBL) Introduction to Social Problems

SOC 24400 (CBL) Spain and Immigrants: A Spanish Language and Culture Course based in Community Service

  • Toledo Program / International

SOC 24721 (CBL) Developmental Disabilities: Integrating Theory & Practice

  • London Program / International

SOC 30910 (EL) Environmental Sociology

SOC 33001 (CBL) Sociology, Self, and Catholic Social Tradition

SOC 33458 (CBL) Mexico - U.S. Border Immersion Seminar

SOC 34123 (CBL) Introduction to Ireland

  • Dublin Program / International

SOC 45000 (CBL) Sociology Internships

THEOLOGY

THEO 20625 (CBL) Discipleship: Loving Action

THEO 20643 (CBL) The Askesis of Nonviolence: Theology and Practice

THEO 20801 (CBL) Theology of Disability

THEO 33931 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Internship: Social Enterprise and Microfinance      Internship

THEO 33933 (CBL) Summer Service Learning: Cross-Cultural Leadership Intern Program

THEO 33936 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins

THEO 33937 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Directed Readings

THEO 33938 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues International

THEO 33950 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

THEO 33951 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: U.S. Healthcare

THEO 33952 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Topics in Social Change

THEO 33963 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Church and Social Action: Urban Plunge

THEO 33965 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing, Power and Hope

THEO 33967 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experiences

THEO 33968 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Communities

THEO 33970 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Global Issues

THEO 34202 (CBL) Approaches to Poverty and Development

  • Chile Program / International

THEO 34605 (CBL) Catholic Social Teaching and Internship

  • London Program / International

THEO 60695 (CBL) Church and State Dialogue for the Common Good in Cuba

 

SUPPLEMENTARY MAJORS, MINORS, AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TRADITION

CST 20625 (CBL) Discipleship: Loving Action

CST 20643 (CBL) The Askesis of Nonviolence: Theology and Practice

CST 23450 (CBL) Labor Colloquium: Labor and the Dignity of Work

CST 30505 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Social Entrepreneurship

CST 33301 (CBL) Sociology, Self, and Catholic Social Tradition

CST 33458 (CBL) México-U.S. Border Immersion Seminar

CST 33933 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Cross-Cultural Leadership Intern    Program

CST 33936 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins

CST 33938 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues: International

CST 33950 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

CST 33951 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: U.S. Healthcare

CST 33963 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Church and Social Action: Urban Plunge

CST 33965 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing Power and Hope

CST 33967 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experiences

CST 33968 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Communities

CST 33970 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Global Issues

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 

CAPP 45565 (Sec. 1) (CBL) Internship

CAPP 45565 (Sec. 2) (CBL) CAPP/TBS Community Service Internship

CONSTITUTIONAL STUDIES

CNST 30405 (CBL) Early Childhood Policy in the U.S.

EDUCATION

EDU 70120 (CBL) Cultural Influences on Children’s Lives

EDUCATION, SCHOOLING, AND SOCIETY 

ESS 30214 (CBL) Sociology, Self, and Catholic Social Tradition

ESS 30611 (CBL) Tutoring in the Community

ESS 30629 (CBL) Early Childhood Policy in the United States: Origins and Current Context

ESS 33613 (CBL) History of American Indian Education: Sociology, Race, Class, Gender, and Schooling

ESS 34353 (CBL) Developmental Disabilities: Integrating Theory & Practice

  • London Program / International

ESS 34360 (CBL) Toledo Internship

  • Toledo Program / International

ESS 40263 (CBL) Autism spectrum Disorder Practicum

ESS 43203 (CBL) Youth Empowerment, Literacy, and Changing Urban Landscapes

HESBURGH PROGRAM IN PUBLIC SERVICE 

HESB 30595 (CBL) Early Childhood Policy in the U.S. Tradition

HESB 30663 (CBL) Environmental Sociology

INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACE STUDIES

IIPS 20729 (CBL) The Askesis of Nonviolence: Theology and Practice

IIPS 30924 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Social Entrepreneurship

IIPS 33202 (CBL) Advocacy for the Common Good

IIPS 33702 (CBL) Sociology, Self, and Catholic Social Tradition

IIPS 50703 (CBL) Restorative Justice: Theory and Practice

IIPS 63205 (CBL) Restorative Justice: Theory and Practice

INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

IDS 30921 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Social Entrepreneurship

IRISH STUDIES

IRST 24208 (CBL) Introduction to Ireland

  • Dublin Program / International

POVERTY STUDIES

PS 35002 (EL) Experiential Learning: Internship

PS 43000 (CBL) Capstone Seminar

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND VALUES

STV 30310 (CBL) Environmental Sociology

WRITING AND RHETORIC

WR 13200 (Secs. 2-3) (CBL) Community Based Writing and Rhetoric

 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

ARCHITECTURE

ARCH 41121 (sec. 2) (CBR) Design VI

ARCH 53411 (EL) History of American Architecture 1630-1915

 

NOTRE DAME LAW SCHOOL

LAW SCHOOL

LAW 70726 (CBL) Applied Mediation

LAW 70728 (CBL) Applied Mediation II: Advanced Domestic Relations Mediation

LAW 70729 (CBL) Advanced Criminal Justice Externship

LAW 70730 (CBL) National Immigrant Justice Center Instruction

LAW 70736 (CBL) Lawyering Practice Instruction

LAW 75721 (sec. 1) (CBL) Economic Justice Clinic I

LAW 75721 (sec. 2) (CBL) Community Development Clinic I

LAW 75723 (sec. 1) (CBL) Economic Justice Clinic II

LAW 75724 (CBL) Intellectual Property and the Entrepreneur Clinic

LAW 75733 (CBL) Public Defender Externship

LAW 75734 (CBL) National Immigrant Justice Center Externship

LAW 75736 (CBL) Lawyering Externship Fieldwork

LAW 75800 (CBL) Appalachia Externship

LAW 75908 (CBL) Intercollegiate Athletics Externship

 

MENDOZA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

ACCOUNTANCY

ACCT 40660 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Tax Assistance Program

ACCT 40670 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Tax Assistance Program

ACCT 40790 (CBL) Accounting of Not-for-Profit Organizations

ACCT 70691 (CBL) Income Taxation of International Individuals

MANAGEMENT

MGT 40700 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Project Management

MGT 60900 (sec. 1 & 3) (CBL) Strategic Decision Making 

MGT 70730 Lean Six Sigma Project Management

MARKETING

MARK 30120 (sec. 2) (CBR) Marketing Research 

MARK 70600 (EL) Social Media

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION—ENTREPRENEURSHIP

BAEN 30505 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Social Entrepreneurship

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION—UNDERGRADUATE

BAUG 30299 Social Venturing Internship

BAUG 30505 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Social Entrepreneurship

BUSINESS ETHICS

BAET 30510 (CBL) Sustainable Development: The Role of Business

MASTERS OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

MBET 70540 (EL) The Business of Sustainability

 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

CIVIL ENGINEERING

CE 40702 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Senior Design

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

CSE 20600 (secs. 1 and 2) (CBR) CSE Service Projects

CSE 40613 (CBR) Web Applications

CSE 40943 (CBL) Autonomous Mobile Robots

CSE 60613 (CBR) Web Applications

CSE 60943 (CBL) Autonomous Mobile Robots

 

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

BIOLOGY

BIOS 40450 (CBL/EL) Clinical Research in Rare and Neglected Diseases

SCIENCE (NON-DEPARTMENTAL)

SC 33902 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Science Policy Ethics: Guiding Science through Regulation of Research and Funding

SC 41171 (CBL) Instrumentation and Science Education

SCIENCE PREPROFESSIONAL

SCPP 46397 Sec. 5 (CBL) Directed Readings – Poverty Medicine

 

CENTERS AND INSTITUTES

CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS

CSC 23855 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten

CSC 33300 (CBL) Community Based Research

CSC 33458 (CBL) Mexico-U.S. Border Immersion Seminar

CSC 33900 (CBL) Advocacy for the Common Good

CSC 33902 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Science Policy Ethics: Guiding Science through Regulation of Research and Funding

CSC 33931 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Internship: Social Enterprise & Microfinance Internship

CSC 33932 (CBL) Summer Service Learning: African American

CSC 33933 (CBL) Summer Service Learning: Cross-Cultural Leadership Intern Program

CSC 33936 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins

CSC 33938 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues: International

CSC 33950 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

CSC 33951 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: U.S. Healthcare

CSC 33952 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Topics in Social Change

CSC 33963 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Church and Social Action: Urban Plunge

CSC 33965 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing, Power and Hope

CSC 33967 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experiences

CSC 33968 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Communities

CSC 33970 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Global Issues

CSC 33971 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Engaging Resilience: A Lifespan Perspective on Human Potential

CSC 33972 (CBL) Restorative Justice Theory and Practice

CSC 33973 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Realities of Race

CSC 33974 (CBL) Prison Writing: Explorations of Freedom from the Inside Out

CSC 33981 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Leadership Training in Social Concerns Seminars

CSC 33991 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Recovering from Mental Illness through Work and Community

CSC 33992 (CBL) Ethical Leadership through Service and Civic Engagement

CSC 34604 (CBL) London Program Internship in Catholic Social Teaching

  • London Program / International

CSC 36991 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) Directed Readings

CSC 60695 (CBL) Church and State Dialogue for the Common Good in Cuba

CSC 63950 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

CSC 63953 (CBL) Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility

CSC 63970 (EL) Global Issues-Graduate

ECK INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL HEALTH

GH 68551 (CBL) Capstone Research

INSTITUTE FOR LATINO STUDIES

ILS 20912 (CBL) Community-Based Spanish: Language, Culture, and Community

ILS 33701 (CBL) Mexico – U.S. Border Immersion Seminar

ILS 33967 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experiences

ILS 35801 (CBL) Summer Service Learning: Cross-Cultural Leadership Intern Program

 

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COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS

 

 

 

 

AFRICANA STUDIES

AFST 43700 / AMST 30465 / ESS 43203 (CBL) 

Youth Empowerment, Literacy, and Changing Urban Landscapes 

Maria McKenna

Credit hours:  3

This course examines youth experiences in a changing urban landscape affected by gentrification, school choice, and disinvestment in low-income minority neighborhoods. We will examine how youth make sense of their lived environments, develop a sense of identity within the context of family and community, and struggle to find safe spaces where they can flourish. To understand key concepts in the course, we will read studies that focus on youth empowerment and the extent to which rich literate experiences and art provide youth with multiple opportunities to develop a sense of personal agency that can foster civic participation and action. To ground our critical analysis of urban landscapes, students will participate in an offsite community-based learning (CBL) project with local youth through a partnership with the Neighborhood Resource Corporation, Notre Dame’s new Center for Arts and Culture (http://artsandculture.nd.edu/), and the Robinson Community Learning Center. Please note: Additional out of class time will be required for this class .  During the spring 2014 semester students will need to be available from 3:30-6:30pm on Wednesdays to participate in the course. 

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AMERICAN STUDIES 

AMST 13184 (CBL) 

History University Seminar: Sanctity and Society

Kathleen Cummings

Credit Hours:  3

An introduction to the seminar method of instruction that explores the major methodologies of the historical discipline and which accents the organization and expression of arguments suggested by readings in historical topics.

AMST 30465 / ESS 43203 / AFST 43700 (CBL) 

Youth Empowerment, Literacy, and Changing Urban Landscapes 

Maria McKenna

Credit Hours:  3

This course examines youth experiences in a changing urban landscape affected by gentrification, school choice, and disinvestment in low-income minority neighborhoods. We will examine how youth make sense of their lived environments, develop a sense of identity within the context of family and community, and struggle to find safe spaces where they can flourish. To understand key concepts in the course, we will read studies that focus on youth empowerment and the extent to which rich literate experiences and art provide youth with multiple opportunities to develop a sense of personal agency that can foster civic participation and action. To ground our critical analysis of urban landscapes, students will participate in an offsite community-based learning (CBL) project with local youth through a partnership with the Neighborhood Resource Corporation, Notre Dame’s new Center for Arts and Culture (http://artsandculture.nd.edu/), and the Robinson Community Learning Center. Please note: Additional out of class time will be required for this class. During the spring 2014 semester students will need to be available from 3:30-6:30pm on Wednesdays to participate in the course.

AMST 30467 / ESS 33613 / HIST 33613 (CBL) 

History of American Indian Education: Sociology, Race, Class, Gender, and Schooling Brian Collier

Credit hours: 3

This course blends the History of Education and American Indian History and is open (by invitation only) to students interested in action research on these two topics. The course may include an opportunity to collaborate on a project with a school that is part of the Native mission network schools and may include travel to a Native community. The course is by invitation only as it has an outcome opportunity of a conference in September 2016.  

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ANTHROPOLOGY 

​ANTH 34320 / HIST 34430 / IRST 24208 / SOC 34123 (CBL)

Introduction to Ireland

  • Dublin Program / International

Kevin Whelan / Margaret Weber

Credit hours: 3

ND Keough Ctr Course: Prof. Kevin Whelan. Evolution of Irish culture from the eighteenth century to the contemporary period; It aims to give students a foundational understanding of the cultural inheritance of the island. While organized in broadly chronological terms, it will also examine crucial thematic concerns—landscape, history, languages, economy, society, politics and government, literature, music, sport. 

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ART, ART HISTORY, AND DESIGN 

ARHI 13182 (CBL)

Fine Arts University Seminar

Robert Glass

Credit hours: 3

University seminars will address a variety of topics in the history of art depending on the interests of the professor. These courses require several short papers as well as a final written exercise appropriate to the material.

DESN 61201 (CBL/CBR)

Industry Practice

Michael Elwell

Credit hours: 3
This cross-disciplinary course will develop and harness useful innovation through an association of expertise from business/marketing, management entrepreneurship, chemistry, engineering, anthropology, graphic design, and industrial design. Collaborating teams of graduate and undergraduate students will engage several product development cycles, beginning with an identification of need or opportunity and concluding with comprehensive proof of concept, tests of function, specified manufacturing processes, and an appropriately resolved, asthetically pleasing product or system. All collaborative team members will be engaged throughout the research and developmental process. Each participant will share in rotating leadership responsibilities, providing direction within their specific areas of expertise and in the context of a sequential course outline.

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ARTS AND LETTERS (NON-DEPARTMENTAL)

AL 24006 (CBL)
Memory and History 

  • Toledo Program / International

Anne Hayes

Credit hours: 3

Taught at a host institution. The purpose of this service-learning course is for students to gain Spanish language competency and gain knowledge of the past through the study of history and memory of our elders. The ultimate goal is to create an Archive of Memory by recording interviews with elderly residents in Toledo. The project will be conducted entirely in Spanish, with improved language skills of students involved. As a Service-Learning course, the project will result in a significant involvement of students with Toledo society. 

AL 34002 (CBL)
Toledo Internship 

  • Toledo Program / International

Anne Hayes
Credit hours: 3

This course must be pre-approved by a Notre Dame department for specific departmental credit within a major. 

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HISTORY

HIST 33613 / AMST 30467 / ESS 33613 (CBL)

History of American Indian Education: Sociology, Race, Class, Gender, and Schooling

Brian Collier

Credit hours: 3

This course blends the History of Education and American Indian History and is open (by invitation only) to students interested in action research on these two topics. The course may include an opportunity to collaborate on a project with a school that is part of the Native mission network schools and may include travel to a Native community. The course is by invitation only as it has an outcome opportunity of a conference in September 2016.

HIST 34430 / ANTH 34320 / IRST 24208 / SOC 34123 (CBL)

Introduction to Ireland

  • Dublin Program / International

Kevin Whelan / Margaret Weber

Credit hours: 3

ND Keogh CT Course: Prof. Kevin Whelan. Evolution of Irish culture from the eighteenth century to the contemporary period; it aims to give students a foundational understanding of the cultural inheritance of the island. While organized in broadly chronological terms, it will also examine crucial thematic concerns—landscape, history, languages, economy, society, politics and government, literature, music, sport.

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LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

LAST 34550 / THEO 34202 (CBL)
Approaches to Poverty and Development
Santiago Program / International
Anne Hayes
Credit hours: 3
Seminar format: Study of meaning and significance of poverty in Latin America, from theological and social science perspective.

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MUSIC

MUS 20691 (CBL)

Wind & Percussion Pedagogy

Kenneth Dye / Alison Thigpen

Credit hours: 1

Notre Dame students will learn teaching techniques on their instruments through hands-on instruction of local students in the Bandlink program. Instruction will be in individual lessons and small group rehearsals.

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POLITICAL SCIENCE                                                                                          

POLS 35901 (CBR/EL)

Internships

Carolina Arroyo

Credit hours: varies 1 to 3

The goal of the internship program is to integrate academic learning with the world beyond the classroom. Internships are available throughout the Notre Dame area with a variety of government offices, non-profit agencies, and NGOs. Interns work with professionals in their area of interest, explore career options, and gain real work experience. Interns are required to work six to eight hours per week. All internships are unpaid. Internship credits are elective and do not fulfill any major requirements.  

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PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 23079 / CSC 33971 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Engaging Resilience: A Lifespan Perspective on Human Potential

Jessica Blaxton / Jay Brandenberger / Hallie Nuzum / Amber Shoaib

Credit hours:  3

This course is a unique opportunity for students to examine interacting factors (i.e. parenting, social connections, poverty) that either promote or inhibit optimal human development. Students will learn through classroom preparation (readings of empirical literature, seminar discussion, and written reflection), community engagement (spending two hours per week at an organization in the South Bend community), and participating in a spring break class immersion to New York City. Topics will include a broad review of human resilience, early intervention for youth, and prevention-oriented public policy. In preparation for the New York immersion, students will explore the current state of urban, at-risk individuals from multiple perspectives (sub-topics include: violence, health care, mental health, welfare, homelessness, food insecurity). The issues discussed during the first half of the course will prepare students for visits with organizations and public leaders in New York City. During the week in NYC, supported by the Center for Social Concerns, students will experience first-hand the realities of living in urban, low-income communities, augmented by learning opportunities unique to New York. Theory and research in the second half of the course will further explore salient concept of resilience in the context of risk and potential, with an eye toward future potentials for prevention in multiple contexts. The course will engage participants both intellectually and personally, with reciprocal potentials for learning and future contribution. Approval Required via Center for Social Concerns. Apply by November 20th (for optimal consideration) via Center for Social Concerns: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/social-concerns-seminars

PSY 23271 / PSY 43271 / ESS 40263 (CBL)

Autism Spectrum Disorder Practicum

Kristin Wier / Joshua Diehl

Credit hours: 3

This practicum/seminar is the logical outgrowth of a long informal relationship that student volunteers have had with families in the Michiana community who have autistic and other special needs children. The practicum aspect of the course will involve students going into a family home and working in a structured program with an autistic child - on average about two times a week for about a total of four to five hours. In addition, students will meet in class once a week for discussion of a range of topics relating to autism, including issues regarding its definition, assessment, etiology, and treatment, as well as topics regarding the impact of autism on the family, community resources, and social policy. A number of classes will feature discussions led by parents of autistic children. This class is particularly recommended for students interested in child clinical psychology, education, developmental psychology, medicine, social work, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. The course is open to non-majors as well as majors.

Requirements: Regular attendance (practicum setting and class), completion of practicum diary, active class participation, a paper on some topic related to autism. Students must have access to a car in order to attend their practicum.

PSY 23852 / CSC 33968 / CST 33968 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Community

Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

This seminar centers around travel to a L'Arche community (e.g., Toronto, Canada) to share community life with developmentally challenged persons. Students draw from the philosophy of Jean Vanier, the works of theologian Henri Nouwen, and other spiritual writings to augment this participatory learning experience.

PSY 23855 / CSC 23855 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten

Jay Brandenberger / Ellen Kyes

Credit hours: 1

Take Ten is a research-based violence prevention program and curriculum designed at the Robinson Community Learning Center. Volunteers work on a weekly basis with schoolchildren of all grades to teach them the skills needed to resolve conflict peacefully. Take Ten's mission is to provide youth with positive alternatives to violence and build their capacity to make more informed choices when faced with conflict. Students participating in the Take Ten seminar will serve as Take Ten volunteers during the semester (February through April with training in January),being part of a team that works at a school in the area one time per week. Additionally, the readings and reflections will allow students to focus on understanding issues of youth and violence from various perspectives. Contact: Ellen Kyes at epaul@nd.edu. Approval required. Apply at Robinson Community Learning Center.

PSY 43271 / ESS 40263 / PSY 23271 (CBL)

Autism Spectrum Disorder Practicum

Kristin Wier / Joshua Diehl

Credit hours: 3

This practicum/seminar is the logical outgrowth of a long informal relationship that student volunteers have had with families in the Michiana community who have autistic and other special needs children. The practicum aspect of the course will involve students going into a family home and working in a structured program with an autistic child - on average about two times a week for about a total of four to five hours. In addition, students will meet in class once a week for discussion of a range of topics relating to autism, including issues regarding its definition, assessment, etiology, and treatment, as well as topics regarding the impact of autism on the family, community resources, and social policy. A number of classes will feature discussions led by parents of autistic children. This class is particularly recommended for students interested in child clinical psychology, education, developmental psychology, medicine, social work, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. The course is open to non-majors as well as majors.

Requirements: Regular attendance (practicum setting and class), completion of practicum diary, active class participation, a paper on some topic related to autism. Students must have access to a car in order to attend their practicum.

PSY 44272 / ESS 34353 /S OC 24271 (CBL)

Developmental Disabilities: Integrating Theory & Practice

  • London Program / International

Gemma Bencini / Nicholas Brill / Vivian Hinchcliffe / Alice Tyrell / Warren von Eschenbach

Credit hours: 3

In this course, students learn how knowledge and understanding of developmental psychology inform professional practice in schools for pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorders and Learning Difficulties. The course examines how children with Autism come to understand their world and how teachers and other school-based professionals devise programs to meet children and young people's very individual needs. The course is based at Drumbeat School, a state school for children and young people with ASD. Each week, students spend time with pupils and professionals in classrooms. This practical focus is followed by lectures on the Autistic Spectrum; Language and Communication; Challenging Behavior; Sensory Perception Difficulties, Multidisciplinary Therapeutic Practice and Inclusion, etc. Students have opportunities to meet with parents and families of young people with Autistic Spectrum Disorders. Special Notes: London Undergraduate Program permission required. Application before departure. Course fees: Travel to Drumbeat School will be partially subsidized. The level of travel costs to be paid by the students will be confirmed before the start of the semester. Textbooks: No textbook assigned.

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ROMANCE LANGUAGES

LLRO 34600 (CBL)  

All Roads Lead to Rome

  • Rome Program / International

Theodore Cachey / Silvia Dall’Olio

Credit hours: 3

Is it possible to understand the immense phenomenon of Rome in a semester of site visits, historical studies, literary readings, film viewings and lectures? Of course not. Nevertheless, students in this course will start to understand Rome by experiencing the complexity of its urban network; by studying the ruins of antiquity and the splendors of Renaissance, Baroque and 18th Century Rome; by tracing the epic adventure that reunited Italy and led to the establishment of Rome as its capital after twenty centuries (so that today, Rome is at the heart of two states: the Italian Republic and of Vatican); by revisiting the tragedies of modern times, including fascism and the civil war; and by learning about the Rome of postwar and contemporary Italy.

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ROMANCE LANGUAGES—FRENCH

ROFR  34910 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL)  

Women of the Loire Valley from the Middle Ages through the 20th Century

  • Angers Program / International

TBD/Odette Menyard

Credit hours: 3

In this course, we will be researching the role and the image of women of the Loire Valley from the early Middle Ages to the 21st century. Attention will be given to the influence and/or active participation of some major figures in politics, religion, literary production and the arts. Our chronological survey will encompass "femmes fortes", « muses et favorites » , « femmes engagées , « salonières et épistolières », « féministes avant la lettre », and two contemporaries. A special place will be reserved for Jeanne d'Arc, viewed as a patriotic warrior, sorcerer, saint, laic saint and current emblem of the far-right political party in France. We will observe artistic representations of these figures (painting, sculpture, music, film), and read a selection of texts by them, or about them. While analyzing their achievements and failures, and the judgment of their peers and History, we will attempt to find a common denominator to answer the question: how did the expectations of and from the women evolve through the centuries? Some film screenings and on-site visits will be required. Assiduous preparation for class and active participation in discussions are expected. Requirements: one oral presentation, a 6-7 page research paper, a final examination. May replace Survey I or Survey II for French minors. Serves as an elective for French majors.

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ROMANCE LANGUAGES—SPANISH 

ROSP 20201 (sec. 1-9) (CBL / EL)

Intermediate Spanish I 

Beatriz Cobeta / Heather Jones / Elena Mangione-Lora / Rachel Parroquin / Andrea Topash-Rios

Credit hours: 3

This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts.

ROSP 20202 (sec. 1-9) (CBL / EL)

Intermediate Spanish II 

Tatiana Botero / Beatriz Cobeta / Heather Jones / Monica Jancha

Credit hours: 3

This is an intermediate second-year language sequence with equal focus on oral and writing skills. It includes a review of basic grammar and then transitions into more difficult features of Spanish. Students learn to discuss and write about Hispanic cultural topics, current events, and literary texts.

ROSP 20237 (sec. 1-4) (CBL / EL)

Conversation and Writing 

Elena Mangione-Lora / Andrea Topash-Rios

Credit hours: 3

Intended to develop writing proficiency through literary and nonliterary texts from Spain and Spanish America while continuing to promote the development of oral skills in Spanish.

ROSP 20460 (sec. 2 & 3) (EL)

Spanish for the Medical Profession

Maria Coloma

Credit hours: 3

This course introduces students who have mastered the rudiments of Spanish grammar to a vocabulary allowing them to discuss medicine and health care with the Spanish-speaking population in the United States.

ROSP 20810 / ILS 20912 (CBL)

Community-Based Spanish: Language, Culture and Community

Tatiana Botero

Credit hours: 3

This fifth-semester language and culture course is designed for students who want to improve their communication skills in Spanish and broaden their understanding of the Hispanic world through connecting with the local Spanish speaking community. Each section may focus on different topics, such as health care, education, social services, history of immigration, and intercultural competence. The course has a required Community-Based-Learning component in which students engage with the Latino community through placements in such areas as health care, youth mentoring or tutoring programs, English as a New Language (ENL) classes, and facilitating educational workshops with parents. In this course, students integrate their service experiences with the academic components of the class through readings, research, reflective writing, and discussion.

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SOCIOLOGY 

SOC 20033 (CBL)

Introduction to Social Problems 

David Sikkink

​Credit hours: 3

Today's society is beset by many serious social problems, for example, crime and deviance, drug abuse and addiction, domestic violence, hunger and poverty, and racial/ethnic discrimination. How do we think about these problems in ways that lead to helpful solutions? In what ways does one's own social background and role in society affect his/her views of these problems? In this course, students will learn to take a sociological perspective not only in examining the causes, consequences, and solutions to some of society's most troubling social problems, but also in taking a critical look at their own perceptions of the problems.

SOC 24400 (CBL)

Spain and Immigrants: A Spanish Language and Culture Course based in Community Service 

  • Toledo Program / International

Claudia Ramirez

Credit hours: 3

In this course, students will participate in several Toledo institutions related to the immigration phenomenon in Spain, collaborating directly either with the immigrant population or with the Spaniards who are working with them (each student's profile and availability will determine that student's placement). This ongoing exchange and collaboration will continue in the classroom, since the language and culture contents will be built by the students and teacher from readings, work experience, and constant debate. At the end of the course, a workshop day will be held to which collaborating institutions, students, and anyone from Toledo who wants to participate will be invited.

SOC 24721 / ESS 34353 / PSY 44272 (CBL)

Developmental Disabilities: Integrating Theory & Practice

  • London Program / International

Vivian Hinchcliffe / Emily Grassby / Christina Pehlivanos / Alice Tyrell / Warren von Eschenbach

​Credit hours: 3

In this course, students learn how knowledge and understanding of developmental psychology inform professional practice in schools for pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorders and Learning Difficulties. The course examines how children with Autism come to understand their world and how teachers and other school-based professionals devise programs to meet children and young people's very individual needs. The course is based at Drumbeat School, a state school for children and young people with ASD. Each week, students spend time with pupils and professionals in classrooms. This practical focus is followed by lectures on the Autistic Spectrum; Language and Communication; Challenging Behavior; Sensory Perception Difficulties, Multidisciplinary Therapeutic Practice and Inclusion, etc. Students have opportunities to meet with parents and families of young people with Autistic Spectrum Disorders. Special Notes: London Undergraduate Program permission required. Application before departure. Course fees: Travel to Drumbeat School will be partially subsidized. The level of travel costs to be paid by the students will be confirmed before the start of the semester. Textbooks: No textbook assigned.

SOC 30910 / HESB 30663 / STV 30310 (EL)

Environmental Sociology

Daniel Escher

Credit hours: 3

Environmental factors shape social phenomena, and human societies alter the natural environment. In many cases, these alterations have become crises that are receiving increasing attention: climate change, deforestation, and pollution. This course will investigate these back-and-forth dynamics between the environmental and the social, gaining insights from major thinkers from around the world. We will then combine diverse case studies with theories of production and consumption, culture and power, and organizations and institutions. The course will conclude by studying social movements aimed at protecting local and national environments and populations. Readings will draw from a range of authors, including sociologists and other social scientists, biologists, lawyers, journalists, and novelists.

SOC 33001 / CST 33301 / ESS 30214 / IIPS 33702 (CBL)

Sociology, Self, and Catholic Social Tradition

Andrew Weigert

​Credit hours: 3

What's Catholic about sociology? What’s sociological about Catholic Social Tradition? What does all this mean for sociology majors, what they study, and how this may affect their careers and lives after graduation? This course is a critical examination of the links between Catholic social thought and sociology as a discipline. We will engage these ideas through an experimental, team-taught seminar format. Readings will include core statements of Catholic social tradition, critiques thereof, and autobiographical essays written by sociologists and others who are dedicated to social justice. An experiential community-based learning dimension is a requirement for this course. All students are to make at least 10 two-hour weekly visits to the Center for the Homeless in South Bend and write a seven page account of their experiences indicating what they learned or wish they had learned and how their experiences impacted their thinking about Catholic Social Tradition.

SOC 33458 / CSC 33458 / CST 33458/ILS 33701 (CBL)

Mexico–U.S. Border Immersion Seminar

Kraig Beyerlein

Credit hours: 1

This seminar and experiential-learning course is broken into two parts. In the fall (for two credits), students will participate in a seminar that will expose them to various perspectives about immigration issues, especially those related to the México-U.S. border. During our in-class meetings in the fall, (approximately 1 hr. & 40 min. per week), we will discuss scholarly and journalistic accounts of why migrants leave their home countries, the struggles they face during the journey, how U.S. citizens are responding, and possible policy solutions. In the spring (for one credit), students will participate in an immersion trip to the Southern Arizona borderlands during the first week of January and in follow-up classroom meetings (approximately 50 min. per week) during the spring semester to process the immersion experience. During the immersion trip, we will observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, be trained for and participate in humanitarian efforts, tour a Border Patrol and detention facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from faith leaders about their current and past border activism, and visit Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community. Throughout the course, particular focus will be given to the intersection of religion?especially Catholic Social Teachings?and border and immigration issues. To be eligible, students must complete an application, posted here: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic/winter/BorderIssuesSeminar.shtml. Enrollment is competitive. The 15 available spots will be chosen based on the application responses, with preference given to those submitting earliest. Students will be notified about their status within a week of submitting the application. There are fees associated with this seminar (see CSC website for information). This is a graded course. Department approval is required.[Note: Due to the overlap in content, students who have completed the one-credit version (CSC 33966/SOC 33066/ILS 30804/THEO 33966) cannot take this course.]

SOC 34123 / ANTH 34320 / HIST 34430 / IRST 24208 (CBL)

Introduction to Ireland

  • Dublin Program / International

Kevin Whelan / Margaret Weber

Credit hours: 3

ND Keough Ctr Course: Prof. Kevin Whelan. Evolution of Irish culture from the eighteenth century to the contemporary period; It aims to give students a foundational understanding of the cultural inheritance of the island. While organized in broadly chronological terms, it will also examine crucial thematic concerns—landscape, history, languages, economy, society, politics and government, literature, music, sport.

SOC 45000 (CBL)

Sociology Internships

Ann R. Power   

Credit hours: varies 1 to 3                                                  

This is an experiential course designed to give students some practical experience in the area of urban affairs, social welfare, education, health care, or business, in order to test their interest, complement their academic work, or acquire work experience preparatory to future careers. Students are placed in a community agency in the South Bend area and normally work eight hours per week as interns under the supervision of an experienced practitioner. Hours are flexible, usually set to accommodate the intern's availability and the needs of the host agency. While there are no prerequisites, preference is given to Sociology majors, ALPP or SCPP majors, PSIM minors, and students who have had course work in an area related to social concerns. This is a graded course. In addition to field work, academic work includes reading scholarly works related to the field placement, periodic group meetings with the instructor and others in the course, periodic short reports, and a final paper. For more information and/or an application, contact Ann Power at Power.4@nd.edu.

The following is a list of agencies that have accepted interns. Students may also request placement in an agency they find on their own (subject to approval by the instructor).

CASIE Center (Child Abuse Services, Investigation and Education)

Center for Hospice and Palliative Care, St. Joseph County

Early Childhood Development Center

Family Justice Center

Good Shepherd Montessori School

Indiana Legal Services

La Casa de Amistad

Near Northwest Neighborhood Inc.

Neighborhood Development Association

Robinson Community Learning Center

Safe Station (Youth Runaway Shelter)

Salvation Army of St. Joseph County (Social Services)

Sex Offense Services, Madison Center

Sr. Maura Brannick Health Center at Chapin Street

Upward Bound

Washington High School, South Bend 

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THEOLOGY

THEO 20625 / CST 20625 (CBL)

Discipleship: Loving Action

Kevin Sandberg, CSC

Credit hours: 3

This course is for students returning from summer service internships or other service experiences who desire an extended opportunity for reflection and analysis. Some of the major themes to be discussed are: Christian compassion, discipleship, and Catholic social teaching. The course culminates with a comprehensive research project on a theological question or issue that emerges from the summer and/or other service experiences and is explored with other academic disciplines. More information about the course format, the experiential learning method and the process of evaluation is explained in the Learning Agreement and Application, available at the Center for Social Concerns.

THEO 20643 / IIPS 20729 / CST 20643 (CBL)

The Askesis of Nonviolence: Theology and Practice

Margaret Pfeil

Credit hours: 3

This course will explore the theology and practice of nonviolence as a form of askesis, or spiritual discipline. The material will include readings from Scripture, the early Christian tradition, and Catholic social teaching. Religious sources outside the Christian tradition will include Gandhi, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Badshah Khan. This course will use the method of community-based learning and will require 20 hours of service at particular sites in the South Bend area.

THEO 20801 (CBL)

Theology of Disability

Miguel Romero

Credit hours: 3

This course explores theological understandings of and approaches to physical and mental disability. On the one hand, it explores ways in which an attentiveness to disability and those with disabilities might allow for richer and deeper theological reflection. At the same time, it explores ways in which theological concepts and insights might contribute to our understanding of disability. For this course students will be required to write several short reflections, a major paper, and take a midterm and final exam. The course will also include a practical component facilitated by the Center for Social Concerns.

THEO 33931 / CSC 33931 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Internship: Social Enterprise & Microfinance Internship

Benjamin Wilson

1 Credit THEO, 2 Credits BA 

Application and interview required—10 week internship program

Taken with BAUG 30200

Students who are completing their junior year in the Mendoza College of Business or who have completed courses in Social Venturing are eligible for this course. After classroom sessions in the spring semester, students work for 8-10 weeks of the summer with social enterprise organizations, for-profit or not-for-profit organizations that attend to a financial, social and/or environmental bottom line. Students use their business skills to promote economic development initiatives, assist with feasibility or business planning for a new social enterprise, or guide future growth of an ongoing initiative through capacity building and other strategic activities. The experiential learning is complimented with readings from Catholic social thought. Course requirements include classroom sessions in April, reading and writing assignments during the summer, classroom discussions and a presentation in the fall semester.

THEO 33933 / CSC 33933 / CST 33933 / ILS 35801 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning: Cross-Cultural Leadership Intern Program

Andrea Shappell / Felicia Johnson-O’Brien

Credit hours: 3

This is a leadership internship for Hispanic studies working 10-12 weeks in a Hispanic/Latino area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will complete the requirements of THEO 33931 and work with the Center for Social Concerns to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved.

THEO 33936 / CSC 33936 / CST 33936 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins

Andrea Smith Shappell / Margaret Pfeil

Credit hours: 3

Immersion: Eight-week summer service-learning placements

This three-credit course of the Summer Service Learning Program takes place before, during, and after student participation in the eight consecutive week summer immersion sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Notre Dame Alumni Association. The goal of the course is to reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through experiential learning, reading, writing and discussions. Writing assignments include journal assignments and a final paper. The course is completed during the first five weeks of fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. Acceptance is based on the student's application and interview. Contact the Center for Social Concerns for more information.

THEO 33937 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Program: Directed Readings

Andrea Shappell / Margaret Pfeil

Credit hours: 3

Students who are theology majors or minors and second-time participants in the Summer Service Learning Program are eligible for this course. Students work individually with a professor in the theology department integrating theological study with questions that arise from the work at the SSLP site. This is a graded course that counts as an elective toward the major or minor. Permission required from the Center for Social Concerns.

THEO 33938 / CSC 33938 / CST 33938 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues: International

Rachel Tomas Morgan / Paul Kollman

Credit hours: 3

This course and internship is synonymous with the Center for Social Concerns International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP). The course seeks to challenge students who have domestic service-learning experiences to encounter international realities, and to provide them the opportunity to work with persons and grass roots groups working to address the needs of the poor internationally. The learning goals of the course are to gain and understanding of the multidimensionality of poverty in the developing world; analyze root causes, and identify strategies for social development (poverty alleviation); to gain an understanding of international social issues in light of Catholic social teaching; and to strengthen cross-cultural competencies. Academic requirements include a journal, reading and writing assignments during the summer months, a re-entry weekend retreat, four re-entry classes meeting on Thursdays 6:30-7:45 p.m. in September and October, and a final paper/project.

THEO 33950 / CSC 33950 / CST 33950 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

Melissa Marley Bonnichsen / Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes (e.g., rural health care, environmental issues) at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.

THEO 33951 / CSC 33951 / CST 33951 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: U.S. Health Care Policy

Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

U.S. health care policy and reform has increasingly been at the center of public debate and discussion in recent years. Furthermore, the Catholic social tradition invites persons of good will to pursue a health care system that raises the dignity of each person. This seminar invites participants to examine and assess our current and evolving healthcare system, explore the possibilities and direction of the future of U.S. healthcare, and investigate how modifications might move us toward a society that reflects care for the common good. As a point of comparison, this seminar will also evaluate international health care systems and challenges. In preparation, students will look at the complexities of integrating economics, policy, and health-related outcomes into a system that works toward the common good and especially toward those in poverty. Students will travel to Washington, D.C., during Spring Break to spend time with policy makers, health care advocacy groups, medical professionals, and researchers. 

THEO 33952 / CSC 33952 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Social Change

Connie Mick / Melissa Marley Bonnichsen

Credit hours: 1

This seminar allows students to participate in an experiential opportunity designed to examine contemporary social problems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.

THEO 33963 / CSC 33963 / CST 33963 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Church and Social Action: Urban Plunge

Melissa Marley Bonnichsen / Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

The Urban Plunge is a one-credit experiential learning course designed to expose students to the sights and sounds of poverty in most major cities in the United States in close proximity to their home town. During the 48-hour immersion each student will have the opportunity to meet people affected by poverty as well as those working to eradicate it. The plunge is scheduled for two consecutive days in early January.

THEO 33965 / CSC 33965 / CST 33965 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing, Power and Hope

Jay Caponigro / Melissa Marley Bonnichsen

Credit hours: 1

Students with previous urban experience are invited to develop new perspectives on the role of neighborhood churches and community organizations responding to injustice in Chicago. By meeting with diverse community organizers, pastors, and leaders, this seminar will engage participants to sharpen their social analysis, challenge their perceptions of power, and learn new forms of ministry for adults committed to social justice. Because of the unique partnership between the Sisters of St. Casimir and the Center for Social Concerns, there will be an element of spirituality and reflection on Catholic Social Tradition throughout the seminar.

THEO 33967 / ILS 33967 / CSC 33967 / CST 33967 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experiences

Melissa Marley Bonnichsen

Credit hours: 1

The goal of the Migrant Seminar is to introduce students to the cultural and social issues surrounding migrant farm labor through experiential learning. Such learning creates a strong foundation of knowledge through direct participation, allowing the development of relationships capable of revealing the diversity, culture, and life challenges of migrant farm workers. Exploration into the plight of migrant farm workers begins in the mandatory preparatory class sessions involving presentations, discussions, videos, and selected readings. The Seminar centers on a week-long trip to Immokalee, Florida during the semester break.

THEO 33968 / CSC 33968 / CST 33968 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Communities

Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

L'Arche communities were created by Jean Vanier (winner of the Notre Dame Award for international humanitarian service) to provide places where people with disabilities and people without disabilities can live and work together in the spirit of the beatitudes. There are over 110 communities in 30 countries. The mission of L'Arche is to create homes where the unique value of each individual is realized and celebrated. L'Arche began in 1964 in Trosly-Breuil, France when founder Jean Vanier invited three men with developmental disabilities to live with him. He named the home L'Arche in reference to Noah's Ark—to be a place of refuge and new beginnings. L'Arche USA is comprised of 13 communities and two projects throughout the United States. Please visit the websites of L'Arche USA.

Each of the communities across North America is different. The Washington, D.C. community is home to 15 people. All of the residents seek to create communities where people with disabilities ("Core Members") can actualize their potential through a full life that guarantees their fundamental human rights—to a home, to meaningful relationships, to an education, to satisfying work, and to enjoyment.
Despite the fact that the individual homes are interspersed throughout the city and nearby suburbs, a strong sense of community life and contact among households prevails. The Core Members live family style with people without disabilities ("Assistants"). Numerous assistants come from across the globe, and these varying nationalities and stories enrich the community. Some assistants reside in the community for a year or two, but others have made it their long-term home—even marrying and raising their family in L'Arche.

A central tenant of L'Arche is that core members have a unique gift for communicating deep spiritual values due to their simplicity and vulnerability. Assistants, visitors and volunteers from all over the world can bear witness to the deep and lasting impact that core members have had on their lives.

The goal of the L'Arche Seminar is to introduce students to the philosophy of Jean Vanier and to the model of service that his writings inspired. Students will also witness how living in a L'Arche community has influenced the lives of the core members, assistants, and others. Students will likely have some opportunity to communicate with other organizations about their advocacy and policy work that relates to people with disabilities. There will be many opportunities to observe, reflect, and learn through this experience.

THEO 33970 / CSC 33970 / CST 33970 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Global Issues

Rachel Tomas Morgan

Credit hours: 1

This seminar serves as the required orientation course for all THEO 33938: International Service-learning Program participants. It will provide students with an introduction to international issues in developing countries through the lens of Catholic social tradition, guidance in independent country/area study, preparation and tools for cross-cultural service, opportunities for theological reflection, logistical information necessary for international programs and travel, and general support within the context of a community of colleagues. Other students doing summer internships in developing countries may take the seminar with permission from the instructor.

THEO 34202 / LAST 34550 (CBL)

Approaches to Poverty and Development

  • Santiago Program / International

Anne Hayes

Credit hours: 3

Seminar format: Study of meaning and significance of poverty in Latin America, from theological and social science perspective. Mandatory 2 credit field work component.

THEO 34605 / CSC 34604 (CBL)

Catholic Social Teaching and Internship

  • London Program / International

James Ashley / Katherine Moore / Christina Pehlivanos / Alice Tyrell / Warren von Eschenbach

​Credit hours: 3

This semester-long internship in Catholic social teaching comprises two parts:(1) practical work experience in campaigning for social justice through a network of inner-city Catholic parishes in London(2) six one-on-one tutorials providing an introduction to the social teaching of the Catholic Church. The practical work experience of this internship is arranged through London Citizens, a charitable organization working mostly through Catholic parishes in London devoted to building community in London's poorest neighbourhoods. Its goal is to bring people into a mutually beneficial working relationship to pursue the common good. It seeks to identify problems in neighbourhoods and then offers the appropriate training to develop leadership skills at the grass-roots level to promote change.

THEO 60695 (CBL)

Church and State Dialogue for the Common Good in Cuba

Kevin Sandberg, CSC

Credit hours: 2

This course, which includes immersion in Cuba from March 4-10, 2016, will enable students to engage with Cubans over Cuban efforts to foster an adoption of the common good - a foundational principal of Catholic social teaching - as a principal aim of public conversation and artistic expression in Cuba. Student will meet with a diverse body of Cubans while in Cuba after having been prepared during pre-departure sessions that include an introduction to Cuban history and culture, especially the work of Felix Valera. The objective of the course is to understand the principle of the common good as it function in Cuban society, and as it might facilitate reconciliation between residents of Cuban and Cuban exiles. Toward that end, the course will also enable students to understand the present situation and aspirations of the Catholic Church in Cuba. The course's learning goals include: awareness of beliefs, values, and interests; analysis of complex social realities and points of view; the synthesis and integration of experientially- and textually-based knowledge; and critical reflection on Catholic social tradition.

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SUPPLEMENTARY MAJORS, MINORS, AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS

 

 

 

 

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TRADITION

CST 20625 / THEO 20625 (CBL)

Discipleship: Loving Action

Kevin Sandberg

Credit hours: 3

This course is for students returning from summer service internships or other service experiences who desire an extended opportunity for reflection and analysis. Some of the major themes to be discussed are: Christian compassion, discipleship, and Catholic social teaching. The course culminates with a comprehensive research project on a theological question or issue that emerges from the summer and/or other service experiences and is explored with other academic disciplines. More information about the course format, the experiential learning method and the process of evaluation is explained in the Learning Agreement and Application, available at the Center for Social Concerns.

CST 20643 / IIPS 20729 / THEO 20643 (CBL)

The Askesis of Nonviolence: Theology and Practice

Margaret Pfeil

Credit hours: 3

This course will explore the theology and practice of nonviolence as a form of askesis, or spiritual discipline. The material will include readings from Scripture, the early Christian tradition, and Catholic social teaching. Religious sources outside the Christian tradition will include Gandhi, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Badshah Khan. This course will use the method of community-based learning and will require 20 hours of service at particular sites in the South Bend area.

CST 23450 (CBL)

Labor Colloquium: Labor and the Dignity of Work

Daniel Graff

Credit hours: 1

This one-credit colloquium will examine the place of labor in the Catholic Social Tradition. We will explore work and its evolution in the modern world (especially in the United States), the development of Catholic social teaching documents on labor questions since the late nineteenth century, and Catholic and non-Catholic perspectives on contemporary controversies such as the desirability of labor unions, the role of gender in the market and the family, and the virtues and vices of capitalism.

CST 30505/ BAEN 30505 / IDS 30921 / IIPS 30924 / BAUG 30505 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL)

Social Entrepreneurship

Melissa Paulsen

Credit hours: 3

Social Entrepreneurship (formerly MicroVenturing I) explores the innovative concepts, practices and strategies associated with building, sustaining, and replicating social impact organizations in less developed countries (LDCs) and here in the United States. Many dynamic organizations are aspiring to a "double" or "triple bottom line"—beneficial human impact, environmental sustainability, and profitability. This course exposes students to a new and growing trend in leadership, venture creation, product design, and service delivery which uses the basic entrepreneurial template to transform the landscape of both for-profit and not-for-profit ventures. In addition, students will analyze various social enterprise business models, including microfinance, microenterprise development, bottom of the pyramid, etc., and will devise strategies and tactics to improve the efficacy of these ventures, as well as engage in research seeking to advance the field of social enterprise at Notre Dame.

CST 33301 / ESS 30214 / IIPS 33702 / SOC 33001 (CBL)

Sociology, Self, and Catholic Social Tradition

Andrew Weigert

Credit hours: 3

What's Catholic about sociology? What’s sociological about Catholic Social Tradition? What does all this mean for sociology majors, what they study, and how this may affect their careers and lives after graduation? This course is a critical examination of the links between Catholic social thought and sociology as a discipline. We will engage these ideas through an experimental, team-taught seminar format. Readings will include core statements of Catholic social tradition, critiques thereof, and autobiographical essays written by sociologists and others who are dedicated to social justice. An experiential community-based learning dimension is a requirement for this course. All students are to make at least 10 two-hour weekly visits to the Center for the Homeless in South Bend and write a seven page account of their experiences indicating what they learned or wish they had learned and how their experiences impacted their thinking about Catholic Social Tradition.

CST 33458 / ILS 33701 / SOC 33458 / CSC 33458 (CBL)

Mexico–U.S. Border Immersion Seminar

Kraig Beyerlein

Credit hours: 1

This seminar and experiential-learning course is broken into two parts. In the fall (for two credits), students will participate in a seminar that will expose them to various perspectives about immigration issues, especially those related to the México-U.S. border. During our in-class meetings in the fall, (approximately 1 hr. & 40 min. per week), we will discuss scholarly and journalistic accounts of why migrants leave their home countries, the struggles they face during the journey, how U.S. citizens are responding, and possible policy solutions. In the spring (for one credit), students will participate in an immersion trip to the Southern Arizona borderlands during the first week of January and in follow-up classroom meetings (approximately 50 min. per week) during the spring semester to process the immersion experience. During the immersion trip, we will observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, be trained for and participate in humanitarian efforts, tour a Border Patrol and detention facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from faith leaders about their current and past border activism, and visit Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community. Throughout the course, particular focus will be given to the intersection of religion?especially Catholic Social Teachings?and border and immigration issues. To be eligible, students must complete an application, posted here: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic/winter/BorderIssuesSeminar.shtml. Enrollment is competitive. The 15 available spots will be chosen based on the application responses, with preference given to those submitting earliest. Students will be notified about their status within a week of submitting the application. There are fees associated with this seminar (see CSC website for information). This is a graded course. Department approval is required.[Note: Due to the overlap in content, students who have completed the one-credit version (CSC 33966/SOC 33066/ILS 30804/THEO 33966) cannot take this course.]

CST 33933 / CSC 33933 / ILS 35801 / THEO 33933 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning: Cross-Cultural Leadership Intern Program

Andrea Shappell / Felicia Johnson-O’Brien

Credit hours: 3

This is a leadership internship for Hispanic studies working 10-12 weeks in a Hispanic/Latino area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will complete the requirements of THEO 33931 and work with the Center for Social Concerns to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved.

CST 33936 / CSC 33936 / THEO 33936 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins

Andrea Smith Shappell

Credit hours: 3

Immersion: Eight-week summer service-learning placements

This three-credit course of the Summer Service Learning Program takes place before, during, and after student participation in the eight consecutive week summer immersion sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Notre Dame Alumni Association. The goal of the course is to reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through experiential learning, reading, writing and discussions. Writing assignments include journal assignments and a final paper. The course is completed during the first five weeks of fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. Acceptance is based on the student's application and interview. Contact the Center for Social Concerns for more information.

CST 33938 / CSC 33938 / THEO 33938 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues: International

Rachel Tomas Morgan / Paul Kollman

Credit hours: 3

This course and internship is synonymous with the Center for Social Concerns International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP). The course seeks to challenge students who have domestic service-learning experiences to encounter international realities, and to provide them the opportunity to work with persons and grass roots groups working to address the needs of the poor internationally. The learning goals of the course are to gain and understanding of the multidimensionality of poverty in the developing world; analyze root causes, and identify strategies for social development (poverty alleviation); to gain an understanding of international social issues in light of Catholic social teaching; and to strengthen cross-cultural competencies. Academic requirements include a journal, reading and writing assignments during the summer months, a re-entry weekend retreat, four re-entry classes meeting on Thursdays 6:30–7:45 p.m. in September and October, and a final paper/project.

CST 33950 / CSC 33950 / THEO 33950 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

Melissa Marley Bonnichsen / Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes (e.g., rural health care, environmental issues) at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.

CST 33951 / CSC 33951 / THEO 33951 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: U.S. Health Care

Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

U.S. health care policy and reform has increasingly been at the center of public debate and discussion in recent years. Furthermore, the Catholic social tradition invites persons of good will to pursue a health care system that raises the dignity of each person. This seminar invites participants to examine and assess our current and evolving healthcare system, explore the possibilities and direction of the future of U.S. healthcare, and investigate how modifications might move us toward a society that reflects care for the common good. As a point of comparison, this seminar will also evaluate international health care systems and challenges. In preparation, students will look at the complexities of integrating economics, policy, and health-related outcomes into a system that works toward the common good and especially toward those in poverty. Students will travel to Washington, D.C., during Spring Break to spend time with policy makers, health care advocacy groups, medical professionals, and researchers. 

CST 33963 / CSC 33963 / THEO 33963 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Church and Social Action: Urban Plunge

Melissa Marley Bonnichsen / Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

The Urban Plunge is a one-credit experiential learning course designed to expose students to the sights and sounds of poverty in most major cities in the United States in close proximity to their home town. During the 48-hour immersion each student will have the opportunity to meet people affected by poverty as well as those working to eradicate it. The plunge is scheduled for two consecutive days in early January.

CST 33965 / CSC 33965 / THEO 33965 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing, Power and Hope

Jay Caponigro / Melissa Marley Bonnichsen

Credit hours: 1

Students with previous urban experience are invited to develop new perspectives on the role of neighborhood churches and community organizations responding to injustice in Chicago. By meeting with diverse community organizers, pastors, and leaders, this seminar will engage participants to sharpen their social analysis, challenge their perceptions of power, and learn new forms of ministry for adults committed to social justice. Because of the unique partnership between the Sisters of St. Casimir and the Center for Social Concerns, there will be an element of spirituality and reflection on Catholic Social Tradition throughout the seminar.

CSC 33967 / CST 33967 / ILS 33967 / THEO 33967 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experiences

Melissa Marley Bonnichsen

Credit hours: 1

The goal of the Migrant Seminar is to introduce students to the cultural and social issues surrounding migrant farm labor through experiential learning. Such learning creates a strong foundation of knowledge through direct participation, allowing the development of relationships capable of revealing the diversity, culture, and life challenges of migrant farm workers. Exploration into the plight of migrant farm workers begins in the mandatory preparatory class sessions involving presentations, discussions, videos, and selected readings. The Seminar centers on a week-long trip to Immokalee, Florida during the semester break.

CST 33968 / CSC 33968 / THEO 33968 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Communities

Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

L'Arche communities were created by Jean Vanier (winner of the Notre Dame Award for international humanitarian service) to provide places where people with disabilities and people without disabilities can live and work together in the spirit of the beatitudes. There are over 110 communities in 30 countries. The mission of L'Arche is to create homes where the unique value of each individual is realized and celebrated. L'Arche began in 1964 in Trosly-Breuil, France when founder Jean Vanier invited three men with developmental disabilities to live with him. He named the home L'Arche in reference to Noah's Ark—to be a place of refuge and new beginnings. L'Arche USA is comprised of 13 communities and two projects throughout the United States. Please visit the websites of L'Arche USA.

Each of the communities across North America is different. The Washington, D.C. community is home to 15 people. All of the residents seek to create communities where people with disabilities ("Core Members") can actualize their potential through a full life that guarantees their fundamental human rights—to a home, to meaningful relationships, to an education, to satisfying work, and to enjoyment.
Despite the fact that the individual homes are interspersed throughout the city and nearby suburbs, a strong sense of community life and contact among households prevails. The Core Members live family style with people without disabilities ("Assistants"). Numerous assistants come from across the globe, and these varying nationalities and stories enrich the community. Some assistants reside in the community for a year or two, but others have made it their long-term home—even marrying and raising their family in L'Arche.

A central tenant of L'Arche is that core members have a unique gift for communicating deep spiritual values due to their simplicity and vulnerability. Assistants, visitors and volunteers from all over the world can bear witness to the deep and lasting impact that core members have had on their lives.
The goal of the L'Arche Seminar is to introduce students to the philosophy of Jean Vanier and to the model of service that his writings inspired. Students will also witness how living in a L'Arche community has influenced the lives of the core members, assistants, and others. Students will likely have some opportunity to communicate with other organizations about their advocacy and policy work that relates to people with disabilities. There will be many opportunities to observe, reflect, and learn through this experience.

CST 33970 / CSC 33970 / THEO 33970 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Global Issues

Rachel Tomas Morgan

Credit hours: 1

This seminar serves as the required orientation course for all THEO 33938: International Service-Learning Program participants. It will provide students with an introduction to international issues in developing countries through the lens of Catholic social tradition, guidance in independent country/area study, preparation and tools for cross-cultural service, opportunities for theological reflection, logistical information necessary for international programs and travel, and general support within the context of a community of colleagues. Other students participating in summer internships or research in developing countries may take the seminar with permission from the instructor.

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COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

CAPP 45565 (Sec. 1) (CBL) 

Internship

Charles Crowell

Credit hours: 1 to 3

The course description for this course is slightly different for each section. CAPP 45565 Section 01 Internship. This encompasses working with various civic, public and or private organizations using acquired computer applications knowledge and skills. Credit is given only if work is done in the Information Systems area of an organization.

CAPP 45565 (Sec. 2) (CBL) 

CAPP/TBS Community Service Internship

Charles Crowell 

Credit hours: 1 to 3

CAPP 45565 Section 02 CAPP/TBS Community Service Internship. This internship was created to allow an interested CAPP/TBS student to lend their skills and talents to a worthy cause in our local community. 

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EDUCATION

EDU 70120 (CBL)

Cultural Influences on Children’s Lives

Brandy Ellison

Credit hours: 3

Readings and research will focus on how culture influences student cognition, performance and adjustment and its relationship to second language learning. Multi-cultural student literature will also be reviewed. 

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CONSTITUTIONAL STUDIES

CNST 30405 / ESS 30629 / HESB 30595 (CBL)

Early Childhood Policy in the U.S.

Rachel Fulcher-Dawson

​Credit hours: 3

This course covers the various issues relevant to the current early childhood education landscape. This includes theories of early learning and child development, policy development in the United States, the issues of inequality and the achievement gap (particularly related to K-12 Education Reform) and research on interventions or "what works" in early childhood programming. The advantage to understanding the theories of child development, the policy context and the intervention research is that it gives future teachers and future policymakers a foundational premise upon which to grow, analyze, learn and teach. Topics covered will include: Theories of Child Development (Infant Schools to Present), Head Start and the CCDBG, State Preschool, Inequality and the Achievement Gap in the Early Years and Interventions in Early Childhood (HighScope/Perry Preschool, Abecedarian and Chicago Parent Studies, Head Start Research). The goal of this class is to come away with a greater understanding of the language, the history, the goals and the possibilities in this policy area as well as its connections to other social welfare programs and to K-12 schooling. Students will become more fluent in the language of early childhood education and will gain the foundational knowledge of past and current theories, laws, policies and educational interventions. 

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EDUCATION, SCHOOLING, AND SOCIETY

ESS 30214 / IIPS 33702 / SOC 33001 / CST 33301 (CBL)

Sociology, Self, and Catholic Social Tradition

Andrew Weigert

Credit hours: 3

What's Catholic about sociology? What’s sociological about Catholic Social Tradition? What does all this mean for sociology majors, what they study, and how this may affect their careers and lives after graduation? This course is a critical examination of the links between Catholic social thought and sociology as a discipline. We will engage these ideas through an experimental, team-taught seminar format. Readings will include core statements of Catholic social tradition, critiques thereof, and autobiographical essays written by sociologists and others who are dedicated to social justice. An experiential community-based learning dimension is a requirement for this course. All students are to make at least 10 two-hour weekly visits to the Center for the Homeless in South Bend and write a seven page account of their experiences indicating what they learned or wish they had learned and how their experiences impacted their thinking about Catholic Social Tradition.

ESS 30611 (CBL)

Tutoring in the Community

Nancy Masters

Credit hours: 1

This class is offered for students who are taking part in any of the campus-wide tutoring programs, such as Teamwork for Tomorrow, SAINTS, Our Lady’s Helpers, etc. The class is a one-credit, S/U course that provides an overview of teaching methods for the tutoring setting. Arrangements for tutoring can be made prior to the start of class by contacting Nancy Masters at nmasters@nd.edu.


ESS 30629 / CNST 30405 / HESB 30595 (CBL)

Early Childhood Policy in the United States: Origins and Current Context

Rachel Fulcher-Dawson

Credit hours: 3

This course covers the various issues relevant to the current early childhood education landscape. This includes theories of early learning and child development, policy development in the United States, the issues of inequality and the achievement gap (particularly related to K-12 Education Reform) and research on interventions or "what works" in early childhood programming. The advantage to understanding the theories of child development, the policy context and the intervention research is that it gives future teachers and future policymakers a foundational premise upon which to grow, analyze, learn and teach. Topics covered will include: Theories of Child Development (Infant Schools to Present), Head Start and the CCDBG, State Preschool, Inequality and the Achievement Gap in the Early Years and Interventions in Early Childhood (HighScope/Perry Preschool, Abecedarian and Chicago Parent Studies, Head Start Research). The goal of this class is to come away with a greater understanding of the language, the history, the goals and the possibilities in this policy area as well as its connections to other social welfare programs and to K-12 schooling. Students will become more fluent in the language of early childhood education and will gain the foundational knowledge of past and current theories, laws, policies and educational interventions.

ESS 33613 / AMST 30467 / HIST 33613 (CBL)

History of American Indian Education: Sociology, Race, Class, Gender, and Schooling

Brian Collier

Credit hours: 3

This course blends the History of Education and American Indian History and is open (by invitation only) to students interested in action research on these two topics. The course may include an opportunity to collaborate on a project with a school that is part of the Native mission network schools and may include travel to a Native community. The course is by invitation only as it has an outcome opportunity of a conference in September 2016.

ESS 34353 / SOC 24721/ PSY 44272 (CBL)

Developmental Disabilities: Integrating Theory & Practice

  • London Program / International

Gemma Bencini / Nicholas Brill/Vivian Hinchcliffe / Alice Tyrell / Warren von Eschenbach

​Credit hours: 3

In this course, students learn how knowledge and understanding of developmental psychology inform professional practice in schools for pupils with Autistic Spectrum Disorders and Learning Difficulties. The course examines how children with Autism come to understand their world and how teachers and other school-based professionals devise programs to meet children and young people's very individual needs. The course is based at Drumbeat School, a state school for children and young people with ASD. Each week, students spend time with pupils and professionals in classrooms. This practical focus is followed by lectures on the Autistic Spectrum; Language and Communication; Challenging Behavior; Sensory Perception Difficulties, Multidisciplinary Therapeutic Practice and Inclusion, etc. Students have opportunities to meet with parents and families of young people with Autistic Spectrum Disorders. Special Notes: London Undergraduate Program permission required. Application before departure. Course fees: Travel to Drumbeat School will be partially subsidized. The level of travel costs to be paid by the students will be confirmed before the start of the semester. Textbooks: No textbook assigned.

ESS 34360 (CBL)

Toledo Internship

  • Toledo Program / International

Anne Hayes

Credit hours: 3
Toledo Internship: (Approval attached) The internship course in the city of Toledo provides a theoretical and practical preparation in the areas of public relations, education, marketing, and journalism, including the knowledge and management of means of communication, administrative skills, techniques, professional work in the student's area of specialization which will allow them to apply theoretical work to situations in the working environment and practice in the work field. The aim of the internship course is to provide the student with an educational experience that is similar to the real-life. It also aims at presenting the students to a work environment where the work conditions will allow the student to become aware of his/her strengths and weaknesses.

ESS 40263 / PSY 23271 / PSY 43271 (CBL) 

Autism Spectrum Disorder Practicum

Kristin Wier / Joshua Diehl

Credit hours: 3

This seminar discusses topics related to developmental disabilities, with a special emphasis on pervasive developmental disorders and autism. Issues regarding their definition, etiology, and treatment are also discussed.

ESS 43203 / AFST 43700 / AMST 30465 (CBL) 

Youth Empowerment, Literacy, and Changing Urban Landscapes 

Maria McKenna

Credit Hours:  3

This course examines youth experiences in a changing urban landscape affected by gentrification, school choice, and disinvestment in low-income minority neighborhoods. We will examine how youth make sense of their lived environments, develop a sense of identity within the context of family and community, and struggle to find safe spaces where they can flourish. To understand key concepts in the course, we will read studies that focus on youth empowerment and the extent to which rich literate experiences and art provide youth with multiple opportunities to develop a sense of personal agency that can foster civic participation and action. To ground our critical analysis of urban landscapes, students will participate in an offsite community-based learning (CBL) project with local youth through a partnership with the Neighborhood Resource Corporation, Notre Dame’s new Center for Arts and Culture (http://artsandculture.nd.edu/), and the Robinson Community Learning Center. Please note: Additional out of class time will be required for this class .  During the spring 2014 semester students will need to be available from 3:30-6:30pm on Wednesdays to participate in the course. 

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HESBURGH PROGRAM IN PUBLIC SERVICE

HESB 30595 / ESS 30629 / CNST 30405 (CBL)

Early Childhood Policy in the U.S.

Rachel Fulcher-Dawson

Credit hours: 3

This course covers the various issues relevant to the current early childhood education landscape. This includes theories of early learning and child development, policy development in the United States, the issues of inequality and the achievement gap (particularly related to K-12 Education Reform) and research on interventions or "what works" in early childhood programming. The advantage to understanding the theories of child development, the policy context and the intervention research is that it gives future teachers and future policymakers a foundational premise upon which to grow, analyze, learn and teach. Topics covered will include: Theories of Child Development (Infant Schools to Present), Head Start and the CCDBG, State Preschool, Inequality and the Achievement Gap in the Early Years and Interventions in Early Childhood (HighScope/Perry Preschool, Abecedarian and Chicago Parent Studies, Head Start Research). The goal of this class is to come away with a greater understanding of the language, the history, the goals and the possibilities in this policy area as well as its connections to other social welfare programs and to K-12 schooling. Students will become more fluent in the language of early childhood education and will gain the foundational knowledge of past and current theories, laws, policies and educational interventions. 

HESB 30663 / SOC 30910 / STV 30310 (EL)

Environmental Sociology

Daniel Escher

Credit hours: 3

Environmental factors shape social phenomena, and human societies alter the natural environment. In many cases, these alterations have become crises that are receiving increasing attention: climate change, deforestation, and pollution. This course will investigate these back-and-forth dynamics between the environmental and the social, gaining insights from major thinkers from around the world. We will then combine diverse case studies with theories of production and consumption, culture and power, and organizations and institutions. The course will conclude by studying social movements aimed at protecting local and national environments and populations. Readings will draw from a range of authors, including sociologists and other social scientists, biologists, lawyers, journalists, and novelists.

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INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACE STUDIES

IIPS 20729 / THEO 20643 / CST 20643 (CBL)

The Askesis of Nonviolence: Theology and Practice

Margaret Pfeil

Credit hours: 3

This course will explore the theology and practice of nonviolence as a form of askesis, or spiritual discipline. The material will include readings from Scripture, the early Christian tradition, and Catholic social teaching. Religious sources outside the Christian tradition will include Gandhi, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Badshah Khan. This course will use the method of community-based learning and will require 20 hours of service at particular sites in the South Bend area.

IIPS 30924 / BAEN 30505 / CST 30505 / IDS 30921 / BAUG 30505 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL)

Social Entrepreneurship

Melissa Paulsen

Credit hours: 3

Social Entrepreneurship (formerly MicroVenturing I) explores the innovative concepts, practices and strategies associated with building, sustaining, and replicating social impact organizations in less developed countries (LDCs) and here in the United States. Many dynamic organizations are aspiring to a "double" or "triple bottom line"—beneficial human impact, environmental sustainability, and profitability. This course exposes students to a new and growing trend in leadership, venture creation, product design, and service delivery which uses the basic entrepreneurial template to transform the landscape of both for-profit and not-for-profit ventures. In addition, students will analyze various social enterprise business models, including microfinance, microenterprise development, bottom of the pyramid, etc., and will devise strategies and tactics to improve the efficacy of these ventures, as well as engage in research seeking to advance the field of social enterprise at Notre Dame.  

IIPS 33202 / CSC 33900 (CBL)

Advocacy for the Common Good

Michael Hebbeler

Credit hours: 1

This one credit course aims to develop a shared understanding of advocacy and the common good, and to cultivate skills to help strengthen students' advocacy planning and action in pursuit of social justice. This course is co-facilitated by seasoned advocates and organizers from Catholic Relief Services. The opening weekend workshop (January 15-16) will introduce students to advocacy tools and skills, including mapping power, navigating the legislative process, mobilizing, developing effective messaging and influencing decision makers. Students will then form groups and spend twelve weeks to research, develop and implement advocacy campaigns on an issue in one of the following areas: sustainability, labor/minimum wage, incarceration/death penalty, and immigration reform. There will be three check-in class sessions and a final class session in which each group will share its campaign phases - research, media use, public meeting - and address challenges as well as celebrate successes. Non Traditional Meeting Days/Dates/Times: Opening Training: Fri, Jan 15th, 5:30pm-9:30pm & Sat, Jan 16th, 9:00am-5:00pm; Check-ins: Mondays 2/1, 2/22, 3/14, and 4/11 from 5:00 to 6:30pm.

IIPS 33702 / SOC 33001 / CST 33301 / ESS 30214 / HESB 43544 (CBL)

Sociology, Self, and Catholic Social Tradition

Andrew Weigert

​Credit hours: 3

What's Catholic about sociology? What’s sociological about Catholic Social Tradition? What does all this mean for sociology majors, what they study, and how this may affect their careers and lives after graduation? This course is a critical examination of the links between Catholic social thought and sociology as a discipline. We will engage these ideas through an experimental, team-taught seminar format. Readings will include core statements of Catholic social tradition, critiques thereof, and autobiographical essays written by sociologists and others who are dedicated to social justice. An experiential community-based learning dimension is a requirement for this course. All students are to make at least 10 two-hour weekly visits to the Center for the Homeless in South Bend and write a seven page account of their experiences indicating what they learned or wish they had learned and how their experiences impacted their thinking about Catholic Social Tradition.

IIPS 50703 / IIPS 63205 / CSC 33971 (CBL)

Restorative Justice: Theory and Practice

Susan Sharpe

Credit hours: 3

Restorative justice is gaining visibility in contemporary social justice efforts. Advocates of change ranging from parents to police, from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops to the cofounders of Black Lives Matter are claiming restorative justice as an important way forward in making our institutions more just and more effective. This course will give students an understanding of how and why that potential exists, and teach them the basics of a primary restorative justice practice. Students will learn the fundamentals of Circle dialogue, situating it in the context of relevant theoretic frameworks and in the context of key restorative justice applications (including criminal justice, education, and systemic injustice). Students will be encouraged to search for potential applications of restorative justice theory and practice in the professional fields they anticipate entering. This will be a community-based learning course, requiring each student to perform 20 hours of work in the local community at pre-arranged sites as part of the course, in addition to regular reading and writing assignments.

IIPS 63205 / CSC 33971  /IIPS 50703 (CBL)

Restorative Justice: Theory and Practice

Susan Sharpe

Credit hours: 3

Restorative justice is gaining visibility in contemporary social justice efforts. Advocates of change ranging from parents to police, from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops to the cofounders of Black Lives Matter are claiming restorative justice as an important way forward in making our institutions more just and more effective. This course will give students an understanding of how and why that potential exists, and teach them the basics of a primary restorative justice practice. Students will learn the fundamentals of Circle dialogue, situating it in the context of relevant theoretic frameworks and in the context of key restorative justice applications (including criminal justice, education, and systemic injustice). Students will be encouraged to search for potential applications of restorative justice theory and practice in the professional fields they anticipate entering. This will be a community-based learning course, requiring each student to perform 20 hours of work in the local community at pre-arranged sites as part of the course, in addition to regular reading and writing assignments.

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INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

IDS 30921 / BAEN 30505 / CST 30505 / IIPS 30924 / BAUG 30505 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL)

Social Entrepreneurship

Melissa Paulsen

Credit hours: 3

Some of the most dynamic and successful businesses are aspiring to a "double" or "triple bottom line": profitability, beneficial human impact, and environmental sustainability. This course exposes students to a new and growing trend in leadership, venture creation, product design, and service delivery which uses the basic entrepreneurial template to transform the landscape of both for-profit and not-for-profit ventures. 

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IRISH STUDIES

IRST 24208 / ANTH 34320 / HIST 34430 / SOC 34123 (CBL)

Introduction to Ireland

  • Dublin Program / International

Kevin Whelan / Margaret Weber

Credit hours: 3

ND Keough Ctr Course: Prof. Kevin Whelan. Evolution of Irish culture from the eighteenth century to the contemporary period; It aims to give students a foundational understanding of the cultural inheritance of the island. While organized in broadly chronological terms, it will also examine crucial thematic concerns—landscape, history, languages, economy, society, politics and government, literature, music, sport. 

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POVERTY STUDIES

PS 35002 (EL) 

Experiential Learning: Internship 

Connie Mick

Credit hours: 1 to 3

Students electing to fulfill the experiential learning requirement through internships in the community (Option B) may do so by enrolling in PS 30002. Students must complete 3 credits total, but may do so in one, two, or three separate internships with corresponding credit, enrolling in PS 30002 each semester they are participating in an internship, or in the Fall semester if the internship takes place over the summer. Students will determine credit value with their internship advisor and a Poverty Studies director. For 3 credits, a student must complete 80 to 100 hours total during one semester or approximately 8 to 10 hours per week for 10 weeks, including time at the site and with the internship advisor. A 2-credit internship requires 50 to 70 total hours (or 5-7 hours for 10 weeks) and a 1-credit internship would involve 30 to 50 total hours (or 3-5 hours for 10 weeks). Students may arrange to intern for more or less than 10 weeks during the semester they are enrolled in PS 30002 and can adjust the weekly hours to correspond to the required total.

PS 43000 (CBL)

Capstone Seminar

Connie Mick

Credit hours: 3

The Capstone Seminar will be topic-oriented drawing on literature from multiple disciplines. The students themselves will be from different majors and will share both the perspectives of their major disciplines as well as their varied experiences in the field thus ensuring that interdisciplinary nature of the inquiry. Experts with diverse perspectives and professional experiences will join the seminar as special guests. 

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SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND VALUES

STV 30310 / HESB 30663 /S OC 30910 (EL)

Environmental Sociology

Daniel Escher

Credit hours: 3

Environmental factors shape social phenomena, and human societies alter the natural environment. In many cases, these alterations have become crises that are receiving increasing attention: climate change, deforestation, and pollution. This course will investigate these back-and-forth dynamics between the environmental and the social, gaining insights from major thinkers from around the world. We will then combine diverse case studies with theories of production and consumption, culture and power, and organizations and institutions. The course will conclude by studying social movements aimed at protecting local and national environments and populations. Readings will draw from a range of authors, including sociologists and other social scientists, biologists, lawyers, journalists, and novelists.

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WRITING AND RHETORIC

WR 13200 (Secs. 2-3) (CBL)

Community Based Writing and Rhetoric

Courtney Wiersma / Jillian Snyder / Tyler Gardner

Credit hours: 3

In cooperation with the Center for Social Concerns, these sections of composition place students in learning situations in the wider community where they are in contact with people who are dealing with the specific content issue of their section. We welcome students with commitment to social justice and community service to enroll.

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SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

 

 

 

 

ARCHITECTURE

ARCH 41121 (Sec. 2) (CBR)

Design VI

Kimberly Rollings

Credit Hours: 3 

Design VI presents students with the opportunity to select one among a number of studio options. Specific focus of studios varies from year to year and is designed to address needs and specific to each fourth-year class.

ARCH 53411 (EL)

History of American Architecture 1630-1915

TBA

Credit Hours: 3 

This course is seminar on the history of architecture in the United States from the colonial period in the 1600s until World War I. The purpose of this course is to introduce some of the formative ideas, major monuments, and characteristic experiences of different building cultures in the United States and to investigate various problems of interpretation raised by the material under review. Architecture will be defined in the broadest possible terms to include vernacular as well as high architecture examples of buildings, distinctive urban configurations, and landscape design. Architectural History will be defined as the record of the rich diversity of human experiences evident in the different ways Americans have shaped the built environment to pursue social, civil, and religious ends. By the end of the semester, students should have an understanding of the cultural and historical factors that shaped American architecture from 1630 to 1915 and should have the ability to identify and distinguish between the different styles and periods of architecture from this period. They should have the research skills to prepare scholarly and theoretical papers and essays on the subject, and they will have experience with in-class presentations on topics related to their research.Course requirements consist of attendance at seminars, completion of required readings and writing assignments.

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NOTRE DAME LAW SCHOOL 

 

 

 

 

LAW SCHOOL

LAW 70726 (CBL)

Applied Mediation

Michael Jenuwine

​Credit hours: 5

This course is open to second- and third-year law students interested in providing mediation services to individuals currently litigating disputes in the courts of St. Joseph and surrounding counties. Through this course, students will have the opportunity to serve as mediators in actual cases involving both civil and domestic relations matters, including child custody, support, parenting time, landlord-tenant disputes, contract disputes, and other matters referred by the courts for mediation. The classroom component of the course will focus on the development of mediation skills and exploration of advanced mediation topics. 

LAW 70728 (CBL)

Applied Mediation II: Advanced Domestic Relations Mediation

Michael Jenuwine

​Credit hours: Varies 1 to 3

Applied Mediation II: Advanced Domestic Relations Mediation Allows students who have satisfactorily completed Applied Mediation to progress to more advanced mediation skills as specifically applied to domestic relations cases. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor. 

LAW 70729 (CBL) 

Advanced Criminal Justice Externship 

Stanley Wruble

​Credit hours: 1

Advanced Criminal Justice Externship Course (01 credit letter-graded)The Advanced Criminal Justice Externship is a 1 credit course through which students provide representation to criminal defendants in the St. Joseph Superior Court pursuant to a Student Practice Certification. With direct supervision by Public Defender and Adjunct Assistant Professor Stanley Wruble, students represent indigent clients charged with low-level felonies (Class D felonies) which can routinely be resolved within one (1) semester. Students represent their clients through all phases of the criminal justice system from charging through plea negotiation or trial and will perform the following tasks: client interviewing and counseling, factual investigation, legal research, case theory formulation, motion practice, suppression and evidentiary hearings, plea negotiation with deputy prosecutors, and trials. Students will attend classroom sessions in the Law School; case work will be performed at the law offices of Professor Wruble in downtown South Bend. Three of the four credits will be classified as field work credits. Professional Responsibility is a pre-requisite or co-requisite. Enrollment by permission only.Pre-requisites/Co-requisitesEvidence is a pre-requisite or co-requisite course. It is preferred, although not formally required, that students applying for this Externship will have taken either or both of the following: Constitutional Criminal Procedure: Adjudication and Constitutional Criminal Procedure: Investigations. Trial Advocacy, either Comprehensive or Intensive, is another preferred pre-requisite or co-requisite but will not be formally required.

LAW 70730 (CBL) 

National Immigrant Justice Center Instruction

Lisa Koop

Credit hours: 1

Four NDLS students will have the opportunity to practice immigration law under the supervision of an experienced NIJC immigration attorney by providing immigration legal services to low-income immigrants in Indiana through NIJC. NIJC will select, screen and house all cases handled through this externship. Students will meet as a class once a week for one hour of instruction on substantive immigration law and lawyering skills, guided discussion and case review. Students will spend an additional eight hours each week conducting case work. Students will handle the representation of one or more NIJC clients and seek immigration benefits before federal agencies and courts. Students will conduct initial intake interviews, identify client eligibility for immigration benefits, complete immigration applications, compile supporting documentation and write legal memoranda. There are no required courses students must take in advance of participating in this externship. However, Administrative Law (70315), Advanced Legal Research (70207), Appellate Advocacy Seminar (73314), Immigration Law (70301), and Introduction to International Human Rights (70417) are recommended. Registration is by permission only. Interested students should submit a cover letter, resume and informal transcript to Lisa Koop at LKoop@heartalliance.org.

LAW 70736 (CBL) 

Lawyering Practice Instruction

Robert Jones

Credit hours: 1

The Lawyering Practice Externship Course allows students to perform 8-12 hours of legal work per week in any court, governmental agency, nonprofit organization, or in-house corporate counsel office while participating in a companion weekly seminar. Students earn three credits (two of which are fieldwork credits) for an eight hour weekly field placement or four credits (three of which are fieldwork credits) for a 12 hour weekly field placement. Placements must involve substantial legal work under the careful supervision of an attorney or judge. Placements are typically in the Michiana area, but students are free to choose placements in other regional cities including Chicago and Indianapolis. Students may not choose placements already offered in existing local externship courses (St. Joseph County Public Defender, South Bend office of the National Immigrant Justice Center, Notre Dame Athletic Department or athletics compliance within Notre Dame’s General Counsel’s Office). All placements must be approved by the instructor and must be finalized before a student may enroll in the course.

LAW 75721 (sec. 1) (CBL) 

Economic Justice Clinic I

Judith Fox/Anne Hamilton

Credit hours: 5

This is a 5-credit, letter-graded course providing training in basic lawyering skills, including interviewing and counseling, as well as ethics, substantive law and procedural law relevant to the representation of clients in litigation and transactions. Students represent clients under the close supervision of a clinical faculty member. The case types vary somewhat among the sections, as described below. The classroom component of the course uses a combined lecture and mock exercise format. Students are sometimes required to participate in a community education presentation. Pre- or co-requisite: Professional Responsibility (LAW 70807 or LAW 70808)

LAW 75721 (sec. 2) (CBL)

Community Development Clinic I

James Kelly / Anne Hamilton

Credit hours: 5

This is a 5-credit, letter-graded course providing training in basic lawyering skills, including interviewing and counseling, as well as ethics, substantive law and procedural law relevant to the representation of clients in litigation and transactions. Students represent clients under the close supervision of a clinical faculty member. The case types vary somewhat among the sections, as described below. The classroom component of the course uses a combined lecture and mock exercise format. Students are sometimes required to participate in a community education presentation. Pre- or co-requisite: Professional Responsibility (LAW 70807 or LAW 70808) 

LAW 75723 (sec. 1) (CBL)

Economic Justice Clinic II

Judith Fox

Credit hours: Varies 1 to 3

Variable credit and letter-graded course open to students who have satisfactorily completed Clinic I. Clinic II allows students to progress to more advanced lawyering skills. Enrollment is by permission of the instructor.

LAW 75724 (CBL)

Intellectual Property and the Entrepreneur Clinic

Joanne Clifford

Credit hours: 5

The Intellectual Property and Entrepreneurship Clinic is a 5-credit, letter-graded course providing training in basic lawyering skills, including interviewing and counseling, as well as substantive law. The classroom component of the course uses an interactive approach including lectures and mock lawyering exercises. Through this course student will work directly with clients on intellectual property issues, such as patentability searches and provisional patent applications, trademark searches and registration, as well as intellectual property license issues and agreements.

LAW 75733 (CBL) 

Public Defender Externship

Gerard Bradley

Credit hours: 1

Involves assisting actual public defenders in representing indigent clients at the St. Joseph County Courthouse-Trial and Misdemeanor Division. Students can expect to represent clients in many capacities, some of which include: negotiating plea bargains with prosecutors; preparing and conducting bench trials; interviewing and subpoenaing witnesses; writing and filing discovery motions; and other activities within the administration of justice. Students are expected to work at the courthouse one full morning or afternoon each week. Besides the courtroom experience, students must attend class sessions once per week that feature prosecutors, police officers, public defenders, judges and probation officers lecturing on their duties as officers of the court. Enrollment: limited each semester at the discretion of the instructor.

LAW 75734 (CBL) 

National Immigrant Justice Center Externship

Lisa Koop

​Credit hours: 2

Four NDLS students will have the opportunity to practice immigration law under the supervision of an experienced NIJC immigration attorney by providing immigration legal services to low-income immigrants in Indiana through NIJC. NIJC will select, screen and house all cases handled through this externship. Students will meet as a class once a week for one hour of instruction on substantive immigration law and lawyering skills, guided discussion and case review. Students will spend an additional eight hours each week conducting case work. Students will handle the representation of one or more NIJC clients and seek immigration benefits before federal agencies and courts. Students will conduct initial intake interviews, identify client eligibility for immigration benefits, complete immigration applications, compile supporting documentation and write legal memoranda. There are no required courses students must take in advance of participating in this externship. However, Administrative Law (70315), Advanced Legal Research (70207), Appellate Advocacy Seminar (73314), Immigration Law (70301), and Introduction to International Human Rights (70417) are recommended. Registration is by permission only. Interested students should submit a cover letter, resume and informal transcript to Lisa Koop at LKoop@heartalliance.org.

LAW 75736 (CBL) 

Lawyering Externship Fieldwork

Robert Jones

Credit hours: 2 to 3

The Lawyering Practice Externship Course allows students to perform 8-12 hours of legal work per week in any court, governmental agency, nonprofit organization, or in-house corporate counsel office while participating in a companion weekly seminar. Students earn three credits (two of which are fieldwork credits) for an eight hour weekly field placement or four credits (three of which are fieldwork credits) for a 12 hour weekly field placement. Placements must involve substantial legal work under the careful supervision of an attorney or judge. Placements are typically in the Michiana area, but students are free to choose placements in other regional cities including Chicago and Indianapolis. Students may not choose placements already offered in existing local externship courses (St. Joseph County Public Defender, South Bend office of the National Immigrant Justice Center, Notre Dame Athletic Department or athletics compliance within Notre Dame’s General Counsel’s Office). All placements must be approved by the instructor and must be finalized before a student may enroll in the course.

LAW 75800 (CBL)

Appalachia Externship

Robert Jones / Melissa Marley Bonnichsen / Anne Hamilton

Credit hours: 1

The Appalachia Externship is a one credit academic externship. Students spend their fall break or spring break providing pro bono legal services at the Appalachian Research and Defense Fund of Kentucky (AppalReD), which is the federal and state-funded low income legal services provider for the Appalachian region of Kentucky. Students also participate in the Appalachia Seminar sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns, which involves several classroom sessions, reading assignments, and written assignments exploring the culture and social issues of the Appalachia region, as well as Catholic Social Teaching. This course does not meet the Skills Requirement.

LAW 75908 (CBL) 

Intercollegiate Athletics Externship

Edmund Edmonds

Credit hours: 2

The Intercollegiate Externship will provide an opportunity for law students to gain practical experience and academic credit in intercollegiate athletics administration through a classroom component taught by Law School faculty and senior-level administrator-attorneys from Athletics and via non-classroom externship work. Potential duties include reviewing contracts; assisting in the creation and revision of departmental policy; researching legal issues related to athletics; researching compliance issues; drafting, reviewing and revising compliance education materials; and auditing eligibility and other compliance-related forms.

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MENDOZA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

 

 

 

 

ACCOUNTANCY 

ACCT 40660 / ACCT 40670 (CBL)

Tax Assistance Program

Ken Milani

Credit hours: 2

Preparing income tax returns for low-income individuals is the primary purpose of the Tax Assistance Program. An introductory Federal Income Tax course is a prerequisite. The course begins with four weeks of classes that focus on tax issues that are important when helping low-income individuals (e.g., determining filing status, calculating the child credit, computing the earned income credit). Following the class sessions, students are assigned to specific locations in South Bend or Mishawaka where the returns are prepared. Certified public accountants are available at several locations to help with complex matters. The Tax Assistance Program has been operating since 1972. The course is a two-credit hour offering graded using a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory scale.

ACCT 40670 / ACCT 40660 (CBL)

Tax Assistance Program

Ken Milani

Credit hours: 2

This course is designed for students participating in the Tax Assistance Program for the second time. Administrative elements of the Tax Assistance Program (e. g, coordinating, organizing, scheduling) will be emphasized in this offering in addition to the tax compliance activities. Students enrolling in this course will handle administrative responsibilities in the Tax Assistance Program (e.g., Chairperson, Logistics Director, Public Relations Director) as well as being involved in the preparation of income tax returns for individuals. The course is a two-credit hour offering graded using a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory scale.

ACCT 40790 (CBL)

Accounting and Reporting of Not-for-Profit Organizations

Douglas Kroll

Credit hours: 3

Fund-accounting concepts for nonprofit institutions: current, capital outlay, debt retirement, trust and agency, enterprise, special assessment funds, general fixed asset and general bond-indebtedness group concepts for governmental units. The application of the fund accounting concepts as applied to hospitals, colleges, universities, and health care organizations.

ACCT 70691 (CBL)

Income Taxation of International Individuals

Ken Milani

Credit hours: 3

Income Taxation of International Individuals is a graduate course that includes participation in the Tax Assistance Program as a requirement of the course. The graduate students involved in the course prepare income tax returns for foreign students and international scholars at Notre Dame. In 2008, more than 700 taxpayers were helped and over 1,300 (federal and state) income tax returns were prepared.

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MANAGEMENT

MGT 40700 (sec. 1) (EL) 

Project Management 

Scott Siler

Credit hours: 1.5

Whether you become a high-profile real estate developer, an investment banker, or an entrepreneur, in any career you'll need some project management skills to get your job done. Everyone tries to get projects finished on time and under budget, but many critical business projects fail anyway. We'll learn the steps associated with successful project management, examine some optimization techniques, learn how to use the software tools that enhance productivity, and discuss how to avoid the implementation pitfalls that cause good people doing good projects to fail.

MGT 40700 (sec. 2) (EL) 

Project Management 

Sharon Hayward

Credit hours: 1.5

Whether you become a high-profile real estate developer, an investment banker, or an entrepreneur, in any career you'll need some project management skills to get your job done. Everyone tries to get projects finished on time and under budget, but many critical business projects fail anyway. We'll learn the steps associated with successful project management, examine some optimization techniques, learn how to use the software tools that enhance productivity, and discuss how to avoid the implementation pitfalls that cause good people doing good projects to fail.

MGT 60900 (Sec. 1 & 3) (CBL)

Strategic Decision Making

Michael Mannor

Credit hours: 2

MBA Core; 2nd Year MBA Only. The scope and role of strategic management encompasses a general management perspective that involves internal and external analysis, complex decision-making, and implementation of these decisions. The course has four goals: (1) to develop an awareness of the strategic decisions that organizations must make and the factors on which they depend; (2) to provide a conceptual framework for identifying, evaluating, and formulating strategies; (3) to integrate material learned in the basic functional courses; (4) to convey an understanding of the formal and informal processes involved in formulating and implementing strategies. A strategy consultation project, a key component of the course, provides an opportunity for students to work with local businesses and apply tools and skills developed in this course as well as other core courses.

MGT 70730

Lean Six Sigma Project Management

Todd Hill / Carol Mullaney

Credit Hours:  4

No matter your career path, it will be helpful for you to have project management skills. Projects are the way a lot of business gets done, yet many people and organizations find themselves lacking in needed project management skills. As such, it probably comes as no surprise that more projects fail than succeed. The purpose of this course is to provide you some frameworks, concepts, and tools that you can use to manage projects. The primary tools will come from the project management discipline, including traditional waterfall and the increasingly popular agile methods. We will round out that toolbox by introducing some complementary change management (the people side of change) and Lean Six Sigma concepts.

Most importantly, we will provide you the opportunity to use these tools on real-world projects dealing with real-world customers. While we will discuss theory and current best thinking within the project management industry, the focus of this class will be to learn through doing.

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MARKETING 

MARK 30120 (Sec. 2) (CBR)

Marketing Research

James Wilkie

Credit hours: 3

Required for all marketing majors. A study of the application of scientific method to the definition and solution of marketing problems with attention to research design, sampling theory, methods of data collection and the use of statistical techniques in the data analysis.

MARK 70600 (EL)

Social Media

Brett Robinson

Credit hours: 2

Participation in the social media "egosystem" requires digital literacy, an authentic voice and a high level of trust. MBA students that complete this course will acquire a deeper understanding of what makes social media technology so persuasive and develop the human skills necessary to foster co-creative relationships with connected consumers. A thorough examination of marketing communication research and case studies from industry professionals will provide MBA students with a solid conceptual foundation for building successful brands and positive consumer experiences with the aid of social media.

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ADMINISTRATION—ENTREPRENEURSHIP

BAEN 30505 / CST 30505 / IDS 30921 / IIPS 30924 / BAUG 30505 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL)

Social Entrepreneurship

Melissa Paulsen

Credit hours: 3

Social Entrepreneurship (formerly MicroVenturing I) explores the innovative concepts, practices and strategies associated with building, sustaining, and replicating social impact organizations in less developed countries (LDCs) and here in the United States. Many dynamic organizations are aspiring to a "double" or "triple bottom line"—beneficial human impact, environmental sustainability, and profitability. This course exposes students to a new and growing trend in leadership, venture creation, product design, and service delivery which uses the basic entrepreneurial template to transform the landscape of both for-profit and not-for-profit ventures. In addition, students will analyze various social enterprise business models, including microfinance, microenterprise development, bottom of the pyramid, etc., and will devise strategies and tactics to improve the efficacy of these ventures, as well as engage in research seeking to advance the field of social enterprise at Notre Dame.

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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION—UNDERGRADUATE

BAUG 30299

Social Venturing Internship

Melissa Paulsen

Credit Hours: 1

By permission only; contact the Gigot Center for Entrepreneurial Studies to register. Junior or senior standing required. Co-requisite THEO 33931/CSC 33931. This course is an experiential- and service-learning opportunity offered in partnership with the Center for Social Concerns to spend up to ten weeks in the field with a micro or social enterprise partner, including ACCION USA, the Aspen Institute, or other similar partner. Students will be required to participate in pre-field orientations, engage in readings relevant to the field of social/micro enterprise, document their experiences via reflection and analysis, as well as participate in an academic analysis/presentation following the field work. Course credit does not count toward an individual's graduation requirements.

BAUG 30505 / CST 30505 / IDS 30921 / IIPS 30924 / BAEN 30505 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL)

Social Entrepreneurship

Melissa Paulsen

Credit hours: 3

Social Entrepreneurship (formerly MicroVenturing I) explores the innovative concepts, practices and strategies associated with building, sustaining, and replicating social impact organizations in less developed countries (LDCs) and here in the United States. Many dynamic organizations are aspiring to a "double" or "triple bottom line"—beneficial human impact, environmental sustainability, and profitability. This course exposes students to a new and growing trend in leadership, venture creation, product design, and service delivery which uses the basic entrepreneurial template to transform the landscape of both for-profit and not-for-profit ventures. In addition, students will analyze various social enterprise business models, including microfinance, microenterprise development, bottom of the pyramid, etc., and will devise strategies and tactics to improve the efficacy of these ventures, as well as engage in research seeking to advance the field of social enterprise at Notre Dame.

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BUSINESS ETHICS 

BAET 30510 (CBL) 

Sustainable Development: The Role of Business

Oliver Williams

Credit hours: 1

In today's interconnected global economy, there is a growing realization that we must restore public trust in business. Integrating environmental, social, and governance issues into corporate management is the overriding purpose of the United Nations Global Compact and its ten principles. This is the heart of the corporate sustainability movement. The objectives of this course are as follows:

  • to introduce the student to the United Nations Global Compact and why its focus on human rights, labor rights, environmental issues, and corruption is so attractive to the many stakeholders of business;
  • to develop the ability to think clearly about how one integrates environmental, social, and governance issues into corporate management;
  • to develop a sensitivity to the moral and ethical values that enable companies to restore public trust in business;
  • to understand how a number of companies are implementing the principles of the Global Compact by examining case studies;
  • to examine and understand the changing role of business in society.

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MASTERS OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

MBET 70540 (EL)

The Business of Sustainability

Joseph Holt

Credit hours: 2

The main goal of the course is to explore how to create extraordinary business value through sustainability and social responsibility. The primary topics covered in the course related to sustainability and social responsibility are (a) the what—current and future trends; (b) the when —conditions under which business value can be created; (c) the how—understanding how to integrate into strategy, daily practices, and the entire value chain. This course does not go into the why due to time constraints and it is assumed that all attending are interested in the topic. Rather the course is focused on pragmatic aspects. Therefore by the end of the course, students will have a general understanding of how to apply sustainability and social responsibility in the business sector. Because seven weeks is too short to become experts in applying sustainability and social responsibility, the course is designed as the beginning of a learning journey that will hopefully extend long into their business careers. Thus, the methodology of the course is highly experiential and interactive. Also students will be left with resources for further learning to guide them.

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

 

 

 

 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

CE 40702 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL) 

Senior Design

Eric Horvath/Elizabeth Kerr

Credit hours: 3

The second semester of an integrated civil engineering design experience. Student teams will work closely with industry professionals and faculty who act as consultants on a real-world design project to facilitate the student's understanding of the students' proposed final designs. This semester will culminate in a final design project including a report, drawings, and presentation.  

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COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING 

CSE 20600 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBR)

CSE Service Projects

Gregory Madey / TBA

Credit hours: 1 to 3

Engineering projects in community service.

CSE 40613 / CSE 60613 (CBR)

Web Applications 

Jesus Izaguirre

Credit hours:  3

Introduction to the concepts and technologies for engineering web software. At the end of this course, students will be initiated in the analysis, design, implementation, and validation of web software. Students will develop a semester-long team project for a real client with a social impact in the community. Individual assignments, quizzes, and participation are also important.

CSE 40943 / CSE 60943 (CBL)

Autonomous Mobile Robots 

Laurel Riek

Credit hours: 3
This course introduces the fundamentals of autonomous mobile robots. We will explore robot locomotion, sensing, perception, localization, mapping, and planning. Because robotics is an inherently physical science, students will have the opportunity to practice concepts learned in class on robots during weekly laboratory assignments.

CSE 60613 / CSE 40613 (CBR)

Web Applications 

Jesus Izaguirre

Credit hours:  3

Introduction to the concepts and technologies for engineering web software. At the end of this course, students will be initiated in the analysis, design, implementation, and validation of web software. Students will develop a semester-long team project for a real client with a social impact in the community. Individual assignments, quizzes, and participation are also important.

CSE 60943/CSE 40943 (CBL)

Autonomous Mobile Robots 

Laurel Riek

Credit hours: 3
This course introduces the fundamentals of autonomous mobile robots. We will explore robot locomotion, sensing, perception, localization, mapping, and planning. Because robotics is an inherently physical science, students will have the opportunity to practice concepts learned in class on robots during weekly laboratory assignments.

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COLLEGE OF SCIENCE 

 

 

 

 

BIOLOGY 

BIOS 40450 (CBL/EL)

Clinical Research in Rare and Neglected Diseases

Kasturi Haldar

Credit hours: 3

A main purpose of this course is to engage upper level undergraduate and graduate students in clinical research in rare and neglected diseases. The focus for each semester is on neglected/infectious diseases with emphasis on worldwide eradication strategies. A major goal is to have Notre Dame students work on a clinical research project in class on some rare and/or neglected disease of major importance. A second important goal of this course is to develop an analogous model(s) for other neglected/infectious diseases. We hope this class will also help the students become advocates for these diseases. The course is also tied to a clinical-translational seminar series to enable students to meet with leading international experts who work in neglected diseases. The class is intended for juniors and seniors.

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SCIENCE (NON-DEPARTMENTAL)

SC 33902 / CSC 33902 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Science Policy Ethics: Guiding Science through Regulation of Research and Funding

Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

Offered jointly with the College of Science, this Social Concerns Seminar will examine ethical responsibilities within science funding allocations and the regulation of basic and translational research. In the framework of Catholic Social Teaching, students will explore science policy development, government funding for science, and the regulation of both basic science and translational research, including special concerns for neglected disease and global health research. The course aims to explore how and why the government invests in research, how those funds are distributed to scientists, and ultimately how new discoveries are translated to new technologies, ultimately for the good of the general public. Working with Notre Dame’s Federal Relations Team in Washington, D.C. over spring break, students will meet with scientists, multiple federal agencies, and policy makers. In preparation for meetings in Washington, 5 panel sessions will feature speakers with experience in research ethics and integrity, advocating for funding for science, distributing those funds, or working at the intersections of government policy, basic science, physics and engineering technology, environmental science, and clinical and translational research. This course poses a unique opportunity for students to network with various federal funding agencies and policy makers in Washington, D.C. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

SC 41171 (CBL)

Instrumentation and Science Education

Michelle Joyce

Credit hours: 1

Students will gain laboratory and troubleshooting skills by testing donated laboratory instrumentation and developing a high school level science experiment utilizing the instrumentation. Students will be mentored by the faculty member and will be contributing to the ND LIGHTS (Laboratory Instrumentation Giving Hope To Students) donation program. ND LIGHTS acquires upgraded/retired instruments from ND laboratories and donates them to resource-limited schools. The program includes the key component of training high school science teacher recipients on how to use the instrument within the context of an experiment that can be incorporated into his/her curriculum. Students participating in this course will learn to test and write protocols for the donated scientific instrumentation, search scientific literature to determine an appropriate experiment for the laboratory instrument, and perform the experiment. Students will be expected to write a report summarizing their work at the end of the semester.

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SCIENCE PREPROFESSIONAL

SCPP 46397 Sec. 5 (CBL)

Directed Readings – Poverty Medicine

Kathleen Kolberg / Brandon Zabukovic

Credit hours: 1

Permission required. Readings focus on learning how patients, families, and healthcare professionals experience illness and healing, how the stories that patients tell become the basis for diagnosis and therapeutic response, what it's like to go through medical training and grow in identity as a physician, and the nature of the doctor-patient relationship and how it is changing. Fall and spring. Note: This course counts as a general elective.

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CENTERS AND INSTITUTES

 

 

 

 

CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS

CSC 23855 / PSY 23855 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten

Jay Brandenberger / Ellen Kyes

Credit hours: 1

Take Ten is a research-based violence prevention program and curriculum designed at the Robinson Community Learning Center. Volunteers work on a weekly basis with schoolchildren of all grades to teach them the skills needed to resolve conflict peacefully. Take Ten's mission is to provide youth with positive alternatives to violence and build their capacity to make more informed choices when faced with conflict. Students participating in the Take Ten seminar will serve as Take Ten volunteers during the semester (February through April with training in January),being part of a team that works at a school in the area one time per week. Additionally, the readings and reflections will allow students to focus on understanding issues of youth and violence from various perspectives. Contact: Ellen Kyes at epaul@nd.edu. Approval required. Apply at Robinson Community Learning Center.

CSC 33300 (CBR)

Community Based Research

Mary Beckman / Danielle Wood

Credit hours: 1

This introductory seminar will introduce students to Community-Based Research (CBR) as a model for the research process. CBR supports democratic processes by involving academic researchers and community partners in addressing community problems. It is, therefore, a collaborative research process oriented toward community involvement. Students will participate in shared learning about the CBR process through readings, discussion, and examples of applications with invited faculty, students, and community partners who are engaged in CBR. Students will have the opportunity to be involved in CBR with a local organization or group.

CSC 33458 / CST 33458 / ILS 33701 / SOC 33458 (CBL)

Mexico–U.S. Border Immersion Seminar

Kraig Beyerlein

Credit hours: 1

This seminar and experiential-learning course is broken into two parts. In the fall (for two credits), students will participate in a seminar that will expose them to various perspectives about immigration issues, especially those related to the México-U.S. border. During our in-class meetings in the fall, (approximately 1 hr. & 40 min. per week), we will discuss scholarly and journalistic accounts of why migrants leave their home countries, the struggles they face during the journey, how U.S. citizens are responding, and possible policy solutions. In the spring (for one credit), students will participate in an immersion trip to the Southern Arizona borderlands during the first week of January and in follow-up classroom meetings (approximately 50 min. per week) during the spring semester to process the immersion experience. During the immersion trip, we will observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, be trained for and participate in humanitarian efforts, tour a Border Patrol and detention facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from faith leaders about their current and past border activism, and visit Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community. Throughout the course, particular focus will be given to the intersection of religion?especially Catholic Social Teachings?and border and immigration issues. To be eligible, students must complete an application, posted here: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic/winter/BorderIssuesSeminar.shtml. Enrollment is competitive. The 15 available spots will be chosen based on the application responses, with preference given to those submitting earliest. Students will be notified about their status within a week of submitting the application. There are fees associated with this seminar (see CSC website for information). This is a graded course. Department approval is required.[Note: Due to the overlap in content, students who have completed the one-credit version (CSC 33966/SOC 33066/ILS 30804/THEO 33966) cannot take this course.]

CSC 33900 / IIPS 33202 (CBL)

Advocacy for the Common Good

Michael Hebbeler

Credit hours: 1

This one credit course aims to develop a shared understanding of advocacy and the common good, and to cultivate skills to help strengthen students' advocacy planning and action in pursuit of social justice. This course is co-facilitated by seasoned advocates and organizers from Catholic Relief Services. The opening weekend workshop (January 15-16) will introduce students to advocacy tools and skills, including mapping power, navigating the legislative process, mobilizing, developing effective messaging and influencing decision makers. Students will then form groups and spend twelve weeks to research, develop and implement advocacy campaigns on an issue in one of the following areas: sustainability, labor/minimum wage, incarceration/death penalty, and immigration reform. There will be three check-in class sessions and a final class session in which each group will share its campaign phases - research, media use, public meeting - and address challenges as well as celebrate successes. Non Traditional Meeting Days/Dates/Times: Opening Training: Fri, Jan 15th, 5:30pm-9:30pm & Sat, Jan 16th, 9:00am-5:00pm; Check-ins: Mondays 2/1, 2/22, 3/14, and 4/11 from 5:00 to 6:30pm.

CSC 33902 / SC 33902 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Science Policy Ethics: Guiding Science through Regulation of Research and Funding

Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

Offered jointly with the College of Science, this Social Concerns Seminar will examine ethical responsibilities within science funding allocations and the regulation of basic and translational research. In the framework of Catholic Social Teaching, students will explore science policy development, government funding for science, and the regulation of both basic science and translational research, including special concerns for neglected disease and global health research. The course aims to explore how and why the government invests in research, how those funds are distributed to scientists, and ultimately how new discoveries are translated to new technologies, ultimately for the good of the general public. Working with Notre Dame’s Federal Relations Team in Washington, D.C. over spring break, students will meet with scientists, multiple federal agencies, and policy makers. In preparation for meetings in Washington, 5 panel sessions will feature speakers with experience in research ethics and integrity, advocating for funding for science, distributing those funds, or working at the intersections of government policy, basic science, physics and engineering technology, environmental science, and clinical and translational research. This course poses a unique opportunity for students to network with various federal funding agencies and policy makers in Washington, D.C. Open to undergraduate and graduate students.

CSC 33931 / THEO 33931 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Internship: Social Enterprise & Microfinance Internship

Benjamin Wilson

1 Credit THEO, 2 Credits BA 

Application and interview required—10 week internship program

Taken with BAUG 30200

Students who are completing their junior year in the Mendoza College of Business or who have completed courses in Social Venturing are eligible for this course. After classroom sessions in the spring semester, students work for 8-10 weeks of the summer with social enterprise organizations, for-profit or not-for-profit organizations that attend to a financial, social and/or environmental bottom line. Students use their business skills to promote economic development initiatives, assist with feasibility or business planning for a new social enterprise, or guide future growth of an ongoing initiative through capacity building and other strategic activities. The experiential learning is complimented with readings from Catholic social thought. Course requirements include classroom sessions in April, reading and writing assignments during the summer, classroom discussions and a presentation in the fall semester.

CSC 33932 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning: African-American

Andrea Shappell

Credit hours: 1

This is a leadership internship for African-American students who work 10-12 weeks in an African-American area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will complete the requirements of THEO 33932 and work with the Center for Social Concerns to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved. An application and interview are necessary for participation.

CSC 33933 / CST 33933 / ILS 35801 / THEO 33933 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning:  Cross-Cultural Leadership Intern Program

Andrea Smith Shappell / Felicia Johnson-O’Brien

Credit hours: 3

This is a leadership internship for Hispanic studies working 10-12 weeks in a Hispanic/Latino area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will complete the requirements of THEO 359 and work with the Center for Social Concerns to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved. Application and interview necessary for participation.

CSC 33936 / CST 33936 / THEO 33936 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Program: Kinship on the Margins

Andrea Smith Shappell

Immersion: Eight-week summer service-learning placements

Credit hours: 3

This three-credit course of the Summer Service Learning Program takes place before, during, and after student participation in the eight consecutive week summer immersion sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Notre Dame Alumni Association. The goal of the course is to reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through experiential learning, reading, writing and discussions. Writing assignments include journal assignments and a final paper. The course is completed during the first five weeks of fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory. Acceptance is based on the student's application and interview. Contact the Center for Social Concerns for more information.

CSC 33938 / CST 33938 / THEO 33938 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues: International

Rachel Tomas Morgan / Paul Kollman

Credit hours: 3

This course and internship is synonymous with the Center for Social Concerns International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP). The course seeks to challenge students who have domestic service-learning experiences to encounter international realities, and to provide them the opportunity to work with persons and grass roots groups working to address the needs of the poor internationally. The learning goals of the course are to gain and understanding of the multidimensionality of poverty in the developing world; analyze root causes, and identify strategies for social development (poverty alleviation); to gain an understanding of international social issues in light of Catholic social teaching; and to strengthen cross-cultural competencies. Academic requirements include a journal, reading and writing assignments during the summer months, a re-entry weekend retreat, four re-entry classes meeting on Thursdays 6:30–7:45 p.m. in September and October, and a final paper/project.

CSC 33950 / CST 33950 / THEO 33950 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

Melissa Marley Bonnichsen / Kyle Lantz

One week immersion required

Credit hours: 1

This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes (e.g., rural health care, environmental issues) at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.

CSC 33951 / CST 33951 / THEO 33951 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: U.S. Health Care

Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

U.S. health care policy and reform has increasingly been at the center of public debate and discussion in recent years. Furthermore, the Catholic social tradition invites persons of good will to pursue a health care system that raises the dignity of each person. This seminar invites participants to examine and assess our current and evolving healthcare system, explore the possibilities and direction of the future of U.S. healthcare, and investigate how modifications might move us toward a society that reflects care for the common good. As a point of comparison, this seminar will also evaluate international health care systems and challenges. In preparation, students will look at the complexities of integrating economics, policy, and health-related outcomes into a system that works toward the common good and especially toward those in poverty. Students will travel to Washington, D.C., during Spring Break to spend time with policy makers, health care advocacy groups, medical professionals, and researchers. 

CSC 33952 / THEO 33952 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Topics in Social Change

Connie Mick / Melissa Marley Bonnichsen

Credit hours: 1

This seminar allows students to participate in an experiential opportunity designed to examine contemporary social problems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.

CSC 33963 / CST 33963 / THEO 33963 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Church and Social Action: Urban Plunge

Melissa Marley Bonnichsen / Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

The Urban Plunge is a one-credit experiential learning course designed to expose students to the sights and sounds of poverty in most major cities in the United States in close proximity to their home town. During the 48-hour immersion each student will have the opportunity to meet people affected by poverty as well as those working to eradicate it. The plunge is scheduled for two consecutive days in early January.

CSC 33965 / CST 33965 / THEO 33965 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing, Power and Hope

Jay Caponigro / Melissa Marley Bonnichsen

Credit hours: 1

Students with previous urban experience are invited to develop new perspectives on the role of neighborhood churches and community organizations responding to injustice in Chicago. By meeting with diverse community organizers, pastors, and leaders, this seminar will engage participants to sharpen their social analysis, challenge their perceptions of power, and learn new forms of ministry for adults committed to social justice. Because of the unique partnership between the Sisters of St. Casimir and the Center for Social Concerns, there will be an element of spirituality and reflection on Catholic Social Tradition throughout the seminar.

CSC 33967 / CST 33967 / ILS 33967 / THEO 33967 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experiences

Melissa Marley Bonnichsen

Credit hours: 1

The goal of the Migrant Seminar is to introduce students to the cultural and social issues surrounding migrant farm labor through experiential learning. Such learning creates a strong foundation of knowledge through direct participation, allowing the development of relationships capable of revealing the diversity, culture, and life challenges of migrant farm workers. Exploration into the plight of migrant farm workers begins in the mandatory preparatory class sessions involving presentations, discussions, videos, and selected readings. The Seminar centers on a week-long trip to Immokalee, Florida during the semester break.

CSC 33968 / CST 33968 / THEO 33968 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Communities

Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

L'Arche communities were created by Jean Vanier (winner of the Notre Dame Award for international humanitarian service) to provide places where people with disabilities and people without disabilities can live and work together in the spirit of the beatitudes. There are over 110 communities in 30 countries. The mission of L'Arche is to create homes where the unique value of each individual is realized and celebrated. L'Arche began in 1964 in Trosly-Breuil, France when founder Jean Vanier invited three men with developmental disabilities to live with him. He named the home L'Arche in reference to Noah's Ark—to be a place of refuge and new beginnings. L'Arche USA is comprised of 13 communities and two projects throughout the United States. Please visit the websites of L'Arche USA.

Each of the communities across North America is different. The Washington, D.C. community is home to 15 people. All of the residents seek to create communities where people with disabilities ("Core Members") can actualize their potential through a full life that guarantees their fundamental human rights—to a home, to meaningful relationships, to an education, to satisfying work, and to enjoyment.

Despite the fact that the individual homes are interspersed throughout the city and nearby suburbs, a strong sense of community life and contact among households prevails. The Core Members live family style with people without disabilities ("Assistants"). Numerous assistants come from across the globe, and these varying nationalities and stories enrich the community. Some assistants reside in the community for a year or two, but others have made it their long-term home—even marrying and raising their family in L'Arche.  A central tenant of L'Arche is that core members have a unique gift for communicating deep spiritual values due to their simplicity and vulnerability. Assistants, visitors and volunteers from all over the world can bear witness to the deep and lasting impact that core members have had on their lives.

The goal of the L'Arche Seminar is to introduce students to the philosophy of Jean Vanier and to the model of service that his writings inspired. Students will also witness how living in a L'Arche community has influenced the lives of the core members, assistants, and others. Students will likely have some opportunity to communicate with other organizations about their advocacy and policy work that relates to people with disabilities. There will be many opportunities to observe, reflect, and learn through this experience.

CSC 33970 / CST 33970 / THEO 33970 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Global Issues

Rachel Tomas Morgan

Credit Hours: 3

This seminar serves as the required orientation course for all THEO 33938: International Service-Learning Program participants. It will provide students with an introduction to international issues in developing countries through the lens of Catholic social tradition, guidance in independent country/area study, preparation and tools for cross-cultural service, opportunities for theological reflection, logistical information necessary for international programs and travel, and general support within the context of a community of colleagues. Other students participating in summer internships or research in developing countries may take the seminar with permission from the instructor.

CSC 33971/PSY 23097 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Engaging Resilience: A Lifespan Perspective on Human Potential

Jessica Blaxton / Jay Brandenberger / Hallie Nuzum / Amber Shoaib

Credit hours:  3

This course is a unique opportunity for students to examine interacting factors (i.e. parenting, social connections, poverty) that either promote or inhibit optimal human development. Students will learn through classroom preparation (readings of empirical literature, seminar discussion, and written reflection), community engagement (spending two hours per week at an organization in the South Bend community), and participating in a spring break class immersion to New York City. Topics will include a broad review of human resilience, early intervention for youth, and prevention-oriented public policy. In preparation for the New York immersion, students will explore the current state of urban, at-risk individuals from multiple perspectives (sub-topics include: violence, health care, mental health, welfare, homelessness, food insecurity). The issues discussed during the first half of the course will prepare students for visits with organizations and public leaders in New York City. During the week in NYC, supported by the Center for Social Concerns, students will experience first-hand the realities of living in urban, low-income communities, augmented by learning opportunities unique to New York. Theory and research in the second half of the course will further explore salient concept of resilience in the context of risk and potential, with an eye toward future potentials for prevention in multiple contexts. The course will engage participants both intellectually and personally, with reciprocal potentials for learning and future contribution. Approval Required via Center for Social Concerns. Apply by November 20th (for optimal consideration) via Center for Social Concerns: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/social-concerns-seminars

CSC 33972 / IIPS 50703 / IIPS 63205 (CBL)

Restorative Justice: Theory and Practice

Susan Sharpe

Credit hours: 3

Restorative justice is gaining visibility in contemporary social justice efforts. Advocates of change ranging from parents to police, from the US Conference of Catholic Bishops to the cofounders of Black Lives Matter are claiming restorative justice as an important way forward in making our institutions more just and more effective. This course will give students an understanding of how and why that potential exists, and teach them the basics of a primary restorative justice practice. Students will learn the fundamentals of Circle dialogue, situating it in the context of relevant theoretic frameworks and in the context of key restorative justice applications (including criminal justice, education, and systemic injustice). Students will be encouraged to search for potential applications of restorative justice theory and practice in the professional fields they anticipate entering. This will be a community-based learning course, requiring each student to perform 20 hours of work in the local community at pre-arranged sites as part of the course, in addition to regular reading and writing assignments.

CSC 33973 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Realities of Race

Melissa Marley Bonnichsen / Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

This seminar will take a close look at the realities of race in the United States in the 21st century. How can Catholic Social Teaching inform our conversation and response to the realities? The classes before immersion will seek honest dialogue about the complexities of race with regard to history, current events, racism, and privilege. Participants will travel together over spring break to urban centers to further the conversation and learning ? likely St. Louis and Chicago. Upon return, we will consider the local racial realities in South Bend and Notre Dame communities.

CSC 33974 (CBL)

Prison Writing: Explorations of Freedom from the Inside Out

Jay Bradenberger / Michael Hebbeler / Shelia McCarthy / Susan Sharpe

Credit hours: 3

What does it mean for an individual and a society to be free, and what does this freedom require? We will explore these fundamental questions of human existence through literature that portrays imprisonment and liberation. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Works include fiction and nonfiction, and the chains we encounter will be both figurative and literal, as many of the authors we will read tell of their experiences inside physical prison walls. Of special focus will be the relationship between the individual and society, as students will reflect on their personal narratives within their respective communities and the broader social structures that bind us all. We will identify chains that hinder our freedom and chains that link us together as we seek to liberate ourselves and our communities. What does it mean for an individual and a society to be free, and what does this freedom require? We will explore these fundamental questions of human existence through literature that portrays imprisonment and liberation. This course follows the Inside-Out model of prison exchange now well established across the United States. It provides an opportunity for "inside students" (at the Westville Correctional Facility) and "outside students" (from Notre Dame) to learn with and from each other and to break new ground together. Notre Dame students travel to Westville each week of the semester for dialogue with students at the facility, who have read the same relevant texts. Works include fiction and nonfiction, and the chains we encounter will be both figurative and literal, as many of the authors we will read tell of their experiences inside physical prison walls. Of special focus will be the relationship between the individual and society, as students will reflect on their personal narratives within their respective communities and the broader social structures that bind us all. We will identify chains that hinder our freedom and chains that link us together as we seek to liberate ourselves and our communities.

CSC 33981 (sec. 1 & 2) (CBL)

Leadership Training in Social Concerns Seminars

Melissa Marley Bonnichsen / Kyle Lantz

Credit hours: 1

This seminar will serve to prepare seminar leaders for immersion experiences over fall break. The overall goal of the course is to improve overall leadership skills, facilitate communal learning across seminars, and uniformly prepare leaders for the specific aspects of CSC seminars. The course will consist of approximately 6 classes around a particular leadership theme led by a variety of CSC staff and faculty. This seminar will culminate in leading an immersion seminar. Department approval is required. Prior to registering for this course, you will need to apply and be accepted as a 2014-2015 seminar student leader. Students that are accepted to be seminar leaders are encouraged to take the course in the semester in which they are leading. There are two sections to this course, the student is only required to participate in 1 of the 2 sections (morning class option or afternoon class option).

CSC 33991 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Recovering from Mental Illness through Work and Community

Jay Brandenberger/Connie Mick/Lisa Anderson

Credit hours: 1

While it is estimated that one in four adults experience some form of mental illness in any given year, the reality is that only 40% of those seek treatment. For those with serious mental illness, finding on-going support is crucial to their recovery, but difficult to find. The Clubhouse is an organization that promotes the recovery of adults living with serious mental illness by providing them with a welcoming community, meaningful work, and supported employment. This seminar will examine the US mental healthcare system and the Clubhouse model. Students will learn about these topics by reading relevant literature and meeting social workers, administrators, and people living with mental illness. In addition, students will actively participate in a week-long immersion experience by visiting the Carriage House in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, to observe and contribute to its daily operations and to meet members. This seminar is a one-credit hour course graded "Satisfactory" or "Unsatisfactory".

CSC 33992 (CBL) 

Ethical Leadership through Service and Civic Engagement

Connie Mick / Joseph Buttigieg

Credit hours: varies 1 to 3

This first-year course is designed to continue to develop the key characteristics of Hesburgh-Yusko Scholars: academic excellence, moral character, successful leadership, and commitment to service. Students sharpen their awareness of global social concerns through tracking and analysis of current events informed by interdisciplinary research on the historical causes of and responses to those events. As that understanding deepens, students move into the future tense: how they can propose and participate in solutions to those issues. The UN Millennium Development Goals stand as one framework from which students identify global challenges and opportunities for leadership, focusing on how disciplined foresight can help establish indicators of progress that move communities toward a preferred future, one defined by justice for all. In order to interrogate the nature of service as a form of leadership, students engage in a range of community-based learning-direct service at local agencies, experiential learning through contact with local experts (University and community-based), and a final project employing community-based research methods. This course emphasizes the development of communication skills—written, oral, and multimodal—as central to reflecting on sound decision making, conducting effective community-based research, and persuading stakeholders to invest in proposed solutions. In short, students consider and express the importance of ethical leadership through intellect, action, and word.

CSC 34604 / THEO 34605 (CBL)

London Program Internship in Catholic Social Teaching

  • London Program / International

James Ashley / Katherine Moore / Christina Pehlivanos / Alice Tyrell / Warren von Eschenbach

​Credit hours: 3

This semester long internship in Catholic social teaching comprises two parts: (1) practical work experience in campaigning for social justice through a network of inner-city Catholic parishes in London (2) six one-on-one tutorials providing an introduction to the social teaching of the Catholic Church. The practical work experience of this internship is arranged through London Citizens, a charitable organization working mostly through Catholic parishes in London devoted to building community in London's poorest neighborhoods. It's goals is to bring people into a mutually beneficial working relationship to pursue the common good. It seeks to identify problems in neighborhoods and then offers the appropriate training to develop leadership skills at the grass-roots level to promote change. Each intern will be placed in a Catholic parish and given the task of helping the parish priest to develop a leadership team in a parish which campaigns for issues of social justice. Last semester, for example, students are working to promote the "living wage" campaign, which will be holding a rally at Westminster Cathedral on 1 May 2006. This practical work experience is supplemented by a series of academic tutorials in which students will read primary and secondary material on Catholic social teachings. These tutorials provide the intellectual framework for the internship. The main themes to be explored in this internship are: (I) Catholic faith and public life - What implications does the Catholic faith have for ordering of public life as well as private piety? Does community organizing provide an appropriate expression of this for Catholic congregations?(ii) Public reasoning in a pluralist society - One response to pluralism is to seek to eliminate religious language from public reasoning. We shall evaluate community organizing as an alternative approach (iii) Conflict and reconciliation - The New Testaments presents Christ both as brining "not peace but a sword" and as the one who reconciles us to God and neighbor. Does community organizing approach conflict and reconciliation in a way which is consonant with Christianity? (iv) Power - Community organizing involves a distinctive analysis of, and attitude to, power. Is it consonant with Catholic social teaching? (v) Nation states and global justice - common humanity, and the body of Christ? We shall explore these issues in the lifth of London Citizens' campaigns on migrants' rights. (vi) Equality-We shall discuss the contribution of community building to the internal life of member congregations, in particular, in increasing the participation of community building to the internal life of member congregations, in particular, in increasing the participation and power of marginalized groups.

CSC 36991 (CBL)

Directed Readings

Connie Mick / Jay Brandenberger

Credit hours: 1 to 3

Research and writing on an approved subject under the direction of a faculty member.

CSC 63950 (CBL) 

Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

Connie Mick / Melissa Marley Bonnichsen 

One week immersion required

Credit hours: 1
This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes (e.g., rural health care, environmental issues) at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.

CSC 60695 (CBL)

Church and State Dialogue for the Common Good in Cuba

Kevin Sandberg, CSC

Credit hours: 2

This course, which includes immersion in Cuba from March 4-10, 2016, will enable students to engage with Cubans over Cuban efforts to foster an adoption of the common good - a foundational principal of Catholic social teaching - as a principal aim of public conversation and artistic expression in Cuba. Student will meet with a diverse body of Cubans while in Cuba after having been prepared during pre-departure sessions that include an introduction to Cuban history and culture, especially the work of Felix Valera. The objective of the course is to understand the principle of the common good as it function in Cuban society, and as it might facilitate reconciliation between residents of Cuban and Cuban exiles. Toward that end, the course will also enable students to understand the present situation and aspirations of the Catholic Church in Cuba. The course's learning goals include: awareness of beliefs, values, and interests; analysis of complex social realities and points of view; the synthesis and integration of experientially- and textually-based knowledge; and critical reflection on Catholic social tradition.

CSC 63953 (CBL)

Civic Engagement and Social Responsibility

Connie Mick / Melissa Marley Bonnichsen

Credit hours: 1

This seminar allows graduate students to participate in an experiential learning opportunity designed to concentrate on civic engagement and social responsibility. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.

CSC 63970 (EL)

Global Issues-Graduate

Rachel Tomas Morgan

Credit hours: 1

This seminar serves as the required orientation course for all THEO 33938: International Summer Service Learning Program graduate participants. It will provide students with an introduction to international issues in developing countries through the lens of Catholic social tradition, guidance in independent country/area study, preparation and tools for cross-cultural service, opportunities for theological reflection, logistical information necessary for international programs and travel, and general support within the context of a community of colleagues. Other graduate students doing summer internships in developing countries may take the seminar with permission from the instructor. 

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ECK INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL HEALTH

GH 68551 (CBR)

Capstone Research

Lacey Ahern

Credit hours: 2

Students will develop a Master's Project topic in consultation with their Faculty Adviser and the Director of Global Health Studies and undertake research and writing. The Faculty Adviser and Director of Global Health Studies will establish a time-line and expected deliverables for each semester that are consistent with students' completing their projects in a timely manner. Students will submit and present their Project to an evaluation committee. MS in Global Health students; will need to take 4 credit hours over the course of the year.

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INSTITUTE FOR LATINO STUDIES

ILS 20912 / ROSP 20810 (CBL)

Community-Based Spanish: Language, Culture and Community

Tatiana Botero

Credit hours: 3

This fifth-semester language and culture course is designed for students who want to improve their communication skills in Spanish and broaden their understanding of the Hispanic world through connecting with the local Spanish speaking community. Each section may focus on different topics, such as health care, education, social services, history of immigration, and intercultural competence. The course has a required Community-Based-Learning component in which students engage with the Latino community through placements in such areas as health care, youth mentoring or tutoring programs, English as a New Language (ENL) classes, and facilitating educational workshops with parents. In this course, students integrate their service experiences with the academic components of the class through readings, research, reflective writing, and discussion.

ILS 33701 / SOC 33458 / CSC 33458 / CST 33458 (CBL)

Mexico–U.S. Border Immersion Seminar

Kraig Beyerlein

Credit hours: 1

This seminar and experiential-learning course is broken into two parts. In the fall (for two credits), students will participate in a seminar that will expose them to various perspectives about immigration issues, especially those related to the México-U.S. border. During our in-class meetings in the fall, (approximately 1 hr. & 40 min. per week), we will discuss scholarly and journalistic accounts of why migrants leave their home countries, the struggles they face during the journey, how U.S. citizens are responding, and possible policy solutions. In the spring (for one credit), students will participate in an immersion trip to the Southern Arizona borderlands during the first week of January and in follow-up classroom meetings (approximately 50 min. per week) during the spring semester to process the immersion experience. During the immersion trip, we will observe Operation Streamline legal proceedings, be trained for and participate in humanitarian efforts, tour a Border Patrol and detention facility, visit the border wall and learn about its environmental impact, hear from faith leaders about their current and past border activism, and visit Nogales to experience everyday life in a border community. Throughout the course, particular focus will be given to the intersection of religion especially Catholic Social Teachings and border and immigration issues. To be eligible, students must complete an application, posted here: http://socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic/winter/BorderIssuesSeminar.shtml. Enrollment is competitive. The 15 available spots will be chosen based on the application responses, with preference given to those submitting earliest. Students will be notified about their status within a week of submitting the application. There are fees associated with this seminar (see CSC website for information). This is a graded course. Department approval is required.[Note: Due to the overlap in content, students who have completed the one-credit version (CSC 33966/SOC 33066/ILS 30804/THEO 33966) cannot take this course.]

ILS 33967 / CSC 33967 / CST 33967 / THEO 33967 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experiences

Melissa Marley Bonnichsen

Credit hours: 1

The goal of the Migrant Seminar is to introduce students to the cultural and social issues surrounding migrant farm labor through experiential learning. Such learning creates a strong foundation of knowledge through direct participation, allowing the development of relationships capable of revealing the diversity, culture, and life challenges of migrant farm workers. Exploration into the plight of migrant farm workers begins in the mandatory preparatory class sessions involving presentations, discussions, videos, and selected readings. The Seminar centers on a week-long trip to Immokalee, Florida during the semester break.

ILS 35801 / CSC 33933 / CST 33933 / THEO 33933 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning: Cross-Cultural Leadership Intern Program

Andrea Shappell

Credit hours: 3

This is a leadership internship for Hispanic studies working 10-12 weeks in a Hispanic/Latino area with organizations dedicated to empowering local communities. Students will complete the requirements of THEO 33931 and work with the Center for Social Concerns to build partnerships with the agencies and people involved. Application and interview necessary for participation.

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