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Spring 2011 Community-Based Course Guide

Community-Based Course Opportunities

The following courses are being offered in the spring semester. They have been listed by department.

To view the courses click on the department in the index below and you will be directed to the Community-Based departmental course listings.

Experiential Learning (EL) classes put students in direct contact with some aspect of the issues being studied in their coursework. The off-campus area offers sites for learning, but students don't necessarily engage in service.

Through a Community-Based Learning (CBL) course, students contribute to the community beyond the campus. Their experiences are integrated into class like a reading assignment, providing them with an additional text for consideration during class discussions and in written assignments.

Community-Based Research (CBR) involves students in an investigation of a question of concern to a non-profit community organization. The results of the study are intended to assist the organization.

 

COURSE INDEX

 

FIRST YEAR OF STUDIES

FIRST YEAR COMPOSITION

FYC 13200 (CBL) Bridging the Gap: Community and the Rhetoric of Idealism

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS

AFRICAN STUDIES

AFST 20716 (Sec. 1) (CBL) Intro. to Social Problems: A Community-based Learning Approach
AFST 43575 (CBL) Race and Ethnicity in the U.S. Latino/a Literature

AMERICAN STUDIES
AMST 30013 (EL) Fieldwork and American Documentary
AMST 30415 (EL) Health and the Latino Paradox

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 35250 (CBL) Cultural Aspects of Clinical Medicine

ART, ART HISTORY, AND DESIGN

DESN 41103 (CBR) Graphic Design III

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
LAST 40428 (CBL) Race and Ethnicity in U.S. Latino/a Literature

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 35901 (CBL/EL) Internships

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 23090 (CBL) Children and Poverty Seminar

PSY 23852 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Communities

PSY 23855 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten

PSY 43271 (CBL) Seminar in Autism

ROMANCE LANGUAGES—SPANISH

ROSP 20460 (EL) Spanish for the Medical Profession
ROSP 40876 (CBL) Race and Ethnicity in the U.S. Latino/a Literature

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 20033 (Sec. 1) (CBL) Intro. to Social Problems: A Community-based Learning Approach
SOC 20033 (Sec. 2) (CBL) Intro. to Social Problems: A Community-based Learning Approach

SOC 20114 (EL) Health and the Latino Paradox

SOC 45000 (CBL) Sociology Internships

THEOLOGY

THEO 13183 (Sec. 5) (CBL) Theology University Seminar

THEO 20653 (CBL) Synergoi: The Theological Ethics of Food Cooperatives

THEO 20827 / THEO 20828 (EL) Christianity and World Religions

THEO 33931 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Internship: ACCION

THEO 33936 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues

THEO 33938 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: International

THEO 33950 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

THEO 33951 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Washington, D.C.

THEO 33952 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Social Change

THEO 33961 (CBL)Social Concerns Seminar: Discernment

THEO 33963 (CBL) Church and Social Action: Urban Plunge Seminar

THEO 33965 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing, Power and Hope

THEO 33967 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experiences

THEO 33968 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Communities

THEO 33970 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: International Issues

THEO 33979 (EL) Song, Caritas, and Social Justice: The Celebration Choir

THEO 33995 (CBL) Global Health Seminar

SUPPLEMENTARY MAJORS, MINORS, AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TRADITION

CST 33936 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues

CST 33938 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: International

CST 33950 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

CST 33951 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Washington, D.C.

CST 33963 (CBL) Church and Social Action: Urban Plunge Seminar

CST 33965 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing Power and Hope

CST 33967 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experiences

CST 33968 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Communities

CST 33970 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: International Issues

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

CAPP 30515 (EL) Systems Analysis and Design

CAPP 45565 (Sec. 1 and 2) (CBL) Internship

EDUCATION, SCHOOLING, AND SOCIETY 

ESS 20203(Sec. 1) (CBL) Intro. to Social Problems: A Community-based Learning Approach

ESS 30611 (CBL) Tutoring in the Community

ESS 33604 (CBL) Strategies for Instructing Children in the Community

ESS 33623 (CBR) Community-Based Research in Parent Involvement

ESS 35623 (CBL) Community Based Research in Education
ESS 35600 (CBL/CBR) Field Experience in Education: Internships in K-12 Teaching
ESS 35608 (CBL) Practicum in Coaching
ESS 40263 (CBL) Autism

HESBURGH PROGRAM 

HESB 30422 (Sec.1) (CBL) Intro. to Social Problems: A Community-based Learning Approach
HESB 30571 (EL) Health and the Latino Paradox
    

MENDOZA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

ACCOUNTANCY

ACCT 40660 (CBL) Tax Assistance Program

ACCT 40670 (CBL) Tax Assistance Program: Administrative Elements

ACCT 70691 (CBL) Income Taxation of International Individuals

MANAGEMENT

MGT 30630 (CBR) Systems Analysis and Design of Information Systems

MGT 40700 (CBL/EL) Project Management

BUSINESS ETHICS
BAET 30510 (EL) United Nations Global Compact
BAET 40540 (EL)Ethical Leadership in Sustainable Enterprise

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

CIVIL ENGINEERING

CE 25600/35600/45600 Civil Engineering Service Projects

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

BIOLOGY
BIOS 40450 (CBL/EL) Developing Health Networks in Rare and Neglected Disease

CENTERS AND INSTITUTES

CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS

CSC 20703 (EL) Health and the Latino Paradox

CSC 23090 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Children and Poverty

CSC 23855 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten

CSC 30950 (CBL) Appalachia: Workshop in Creative Nonfiction

CSC 33931 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Internship: Microfinance and Social Venturing

CSC 33936 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues

CSC 33938 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: International

CSC 33950 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

CSC 33951 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Washington, D.C.

CSC 33952 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Social Change

CSC 33961 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Discernment

CSC 33963 (CBL) Church and Social Action: Urban Plunge Seminar

CSC 33965 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing, Power and Hope

CSC 33966 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Border Issues

CSC 33967 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experiences

CSC 33968 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Communities

CSC 33970 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: International Issues

CSC 33976 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Environmental Justice & Human Rights in Gulf Coast

CSC 33978 (EL) Social Concerns Seminar: Urban Poverty and Causes of Homelessness

CSC 33979 (EL) Song, Caritas, and Social Justice: The Celebration Choir

CSC 33981 (EL) Leading with Community: Practicum in Social Concerns Seminars
CSC 33992 (CBL) Ethical Leadership Through Service and Civic Engagement
CSC 33994 (CBL) Appalachia Advanced Topics

CSC 33995 (CBL) Global Health Seminar
 

INSTITUTE FOR LATINO STUDIES

ILS 20703 (EL) Health and the Latino Paradox

ILS 40910 (CBL) Race & Ethnicity in U.S. Latino/a Literature

 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

 

FIRST YEAR OF STUDIES

 

FIRST YEAR COMPOSITION                           

FYC 13200 (CBL)

Bridging the Gap: Community and the Rhetoric of Idealism

Ed Kelly

Bridging the Gap focuses on critical reading and writing, community building, and service. It asks students to use close reading skills and experience in community and volunteer service to ground and inform the argumentative essays they generate. In addition to standard FYC goals, there are three others for this course: 1) to foster a genuine spirit of community in the classroom; 2) to deepen student understanding of selected social justice issues; and 3) to promote learning through service. Service opportunities include tutoring local students (including the homeless and detained) or working with the elderly.

BACK TO INDEX

 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS

 

AFRICAN STUDIES


AFST 20716 / ESS 20203 / HESB 30422 / SOC 20033 (Sections 01 and 02) (CBL)
Introduction to Social Problems: A Community-based Learning Approach
Christopher Morrissey

This course introduces a sociological study of some of the serious social problems plaguing society. Among these are poverty and homelessness, racial disparities, gender injustice, gross educational inequalities, interpersonal violence, and difficulties faced by prisoners upon re-entry to society. This course will give students opportunities to practice good social science by comparing theories about the causes of social problems and possible solutions to (1) empirical evidence presented in important sociological studies and (2) evidence gleaned by students through their own community-based learning experiences. To gain this first-hand knowledge, students enrolled in this course must volunteer a minimum of 20 hours during the course of the semester in a South Bend community organization dealing with one or more of these social problems.

AFST 43575 / ILS 40910 / LAST 40428 / ROSP 40876 (CBL)
Race and Ethnicity in U.S. Latino/a Literature

Marisel Moreno


In this course, students will examine the key issues of race and ethnicity in U.S. Latina/o literary production, particularly in the works of Afro-Latina/o, Andean-Latina/o (and other Latinos of indigenous descent), and Asian-Latina/o authors. The range of races, ethnicities, and nationalities of the established and emerging authors studied in the course will enhance the students' understanding of the complexity and heterogeneity of that group that we call "Latinos." The course will be divided into three major units: Caribbean, Central American, and South American Latinos. Students will read works by migrants from a range of countries, including Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Panamá, Perú, Ecuador, Uruguay and Colombia. This course will have a service-learning component. Students will be required to spend two hours per week volunteering at the local Hispanic community center Casa de Amistad. The course will be conducted in Spanish. Participation, frequent short essays, a journal, midterm, final exam, and final paper will determine the final grade.

BACK TO INDEX

 

AMERICAN STUDIES


AMST 30113 (EL)
Fieldwork and American Documentary

Benjamin Giamo


This course is fashioned more like a workshop. Students will be engaged in fieldwork either on campus or in the surrounding community. By investigating and documenting people, culture, place and setting, students will combine the imaginative work of the writer with the analytical work of the intellectual. Whether conducting journalistic inquiry, in-depth interviewing, oral history, participant observation, or ethnography, students will take the initiative in making contact and building rapport with their respective subjects. Group work based upon ongoing fieldwork (and supplemented by readings) will be the basis for classroom discussion. That is, in addition to considering exemplary readings in various genres on nonfiction, we will focus on students' fieldwork process and results in class. Along with a substantive written account of the fieldwork, an oral presentation is required. (Students wishing to pursue community-based research will be accommodated).

AMST 30415 / CSC 20703 / HESB 30571 / ILS 20703 / SOC 20114 (EL)
Health and the Latino Paradox

Cynthia Duarte


The objective of this course is to enhance your awareness of major theories, concepts, issues and research studies related to the physical and mental health of Latinos in the United States. Particular attention will be drawn to the diversity of the Latino experience in the United States and the health care system in terms of country of origin, race, class, gender, and generation. This course attempts to be an introduction to the historical, political, economic and social structures that determine how a subpopulation in the United States is defined within and navigates thru a primary institution, like health care, and the ramifications of this for the society at large.

BACK TO INDEX

 

ANTHROPOLOGY

ANTH 35250 (CBL)

Cultural Aspects of Clinical Medicine

Robert Wolosin

This course focuses on social science approaches to sickness and healing. The medical encounter is examined from anthropological perspectives. The course emphasizes the difficulties traditional biomedicine has in addressing patients’ expectations for care. Students serve an internship as patient ombudsman in a local hospital emergency room four hours per week. Students must obtain authorization numbers through the Department of Anthropology (314 O’Shaughnessy).

Prerequisite: Open only to juniors and seniors. Must have access to transportation to a local hospital. Must be able to spend one four hour evening session per week in hospital internship.

BACK TO INDEX

 

ART, ART HISTORY, AND DESIGN

DESN 41103 (CBR)

Graphic Design III

Crispin Prebys

Logo and Identity Design for local not-for-profit agencies

Every semester my Graphic Design three students are asked to design a new logo and initial identity pieces for not-for-profit organizations. The organization can be in South Bend area or their hometown. Many students have had their work accepted and produced, including logo and additional design materials for the Potawatomi Zoo, Center for the Homeless Paint Services, El Buen Vecino, Notre Dame Pilot Initiative, Campus Ministries, Global Health Alliance, A Different Way, Iron Sharpens Iron, Reins of Life, A.D.A.P.T., and Holy Cross Elementary School.

Art in April at St. John the Baptist

In a continuing effort to have the class give back to the community and help more people understand what design is, every year my spring semester Graphic Design 3 class visits children at St. John the Baptist elementary school here in South Bend and guide the upper level students through a graphic design project. The Notre Dame students are broken up into groups and each group selects a project they would like to teach to the elementary school children. We visit St. John two times, first to introduce ourselves and the project and a second time to "art direct" the students as they create their pieces.

BACK TO INDEX                               

 

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES


LAST 40428 / AFST 43575 / ILS 40910 / ROSP 40876 (CBL)
Race and Ethnicity in U.S. Latino/a Literature

Marisel Moreno


In this course, students will examine the key issues of race and ethnicity in U.S. Latina/o literary production, particularly in the works of Afro-Latina/o, Andean-Latina/o (and other Latinos of indigenous descent), and Asian-Latina/o authors. The range of races, ethnicities, and nationalities of the established and emerging authors studied in the course will enhance the students' understanding of the complexity and heterogeneity of that group that we call "Latinos." The course will be divided into three major units: Caribbean, Central American, and South American Latinos. Students will read works by migrants from a range of countries, including Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Panamá, Perú, Ecuador, Uruguay and Colombia. This course will have a service-learning component. Students will be required to spend two hours per week volunteering at the local Hispanic community center Casa de Amistad. The course will be conducted in Spanish. Participation, frequent short essays, a journal, midterm, final exam, and final paper will determine the final grade.


BACK TO INDEX

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 35901 (CBR/EL)

Internships

Carolina Arroyo

The goal of the internship program is to integrate academic learning with the world beyond the classroom. Internships are available throughout the Notre Dame area with a variety of government offices, non-profit agencies, and NGOs. Interns work with professionals in their area of interest, explore career options, and gain real work experience. Interns are required to work six to eight hours per week. All internships are unpaid. Internship credits are elective and do not fulfill any major requirements. 

BACK TO INDEX

 

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 23090 / CSC 23090 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Children and Poverty Seminar

Kalsea Koss / Gaoli Saedi / Susan Gunderson / Jay Brandenberger

This course is a unique opportunity for student participants to examine important issues, both domestic and international, with respect to children and youth challenged by poverty and related concerns. The Seminar will focus in particular on early intervention and prevention, education, public policy, and community outreach. Participants will begin their exploration during orientation sessions, where the current state of children in poverty will be examined from multiple perspectives and within different domains. Students will help present relevant organizations and issues to the group during the orientation sessions in order to prepare for the visits in New York City.

During a week of immersion in New York City, participants will learn from individuals and community-based organizations. Visits with both children and program administrators will enable participants to experience first-hand the realities of growing up in poverty. In addition, the learning opportunities uniquely presented by New York City will be jointly utilized to enhance the experience.

PSY 23852 / CSC 33968 / CST 33968 / THEO 33968 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Communities

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This Seminar centers around travel to a L’Arche community (e. g., Toronto, Canada) to share community life with developmentally challenged persons. Students draw from the philosophy of Jean Vanier, the works of theologian Henri Nouwen, and other spiritual writings to augment this participatory learning experience.

PSY 23855 / CSC 23855 (EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten

Ellen Kyes


Take Ten is a research-based violence prevention program and curriculum designed at the Robinson Community Learning Center. Volunteers work on a weekly basis with schoolchildren of all grades to teach them the skills needed to resolve conflict peacefully. Take Ten's mission is to provide youth with positive alternatives to violence and build their capacity to make more informed choices when faced with conflict. Students participating in the Take Ten seminar will serve as Take Ten volunteers during the semester (February through April with training in January),being part of a team that works at a school in the area one time per week. Additionally, the readings and reflections will allow students to focus on understanding issues of youth and violence from various perspectives. Contact: Ellen Kyes at epaul@nd.edu. Approval required. Apply at Robinson Community Learning Center.

PSY 43271 (CBL)

Seminar in Autism

Thomas Whitman

This practicum/seminar is the logical outgrowth of a long informal relationship that student volunteers have had with families in the Michiana community who have autistic and other special needs children. The practicum aspect of the course will involve students going into a family home and working in a structured program with an autistic child - on average about two times a week for about a total of four to five hours. In addition, students will meet in class once a week for discussion of a range of topics relating to autism, including issues regarding its definition, assessment, etiology, and treatment, as well as topics regarding the impact of autism on the family, community resources, and social policy. A number of classes will feature discussions led by parents of autistic children. This class is particularly recommended for students interested in child clinical psychology, education, developmental psychology, medicine, social work, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. The course is open to non-majors as well as majors.

Requirements: Regular attendance (practicum setting and class), completion of practicum diary, active class participation, a paper on some topic related to autism. Students must have access to a car in order to attend their practicum.

BACK TO INDEX

 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES — SPANISH

ROSP 20460 (EL)
Spanish for the Medical Profession

Maria Coloma


This course introduces students who have mastered the rudiments of Spanish grammar to a vocabulary allowing them to discuss medicine and health care with the Spanish-speaking population in the United States.


ROSP 40876 /AFST 43575 / ILS 40910 / LAST 40428 (CBL)
Race and Ethnicity in U.S. Latino/a Literature

Marisel Moreno


In this course, students will examine the key issues of race and ethnicity in U.S. Latina/o literary production, particularly in the works of Afro-Latina/o, Andean-Latina/o (and other Latinos of indigenous descent), and Asian-Latina/o authors. The range of races, ethnicities, and nationalities of the established and emerging authors studied in the course will enhance the students' understanding of the complexity and heterogeneity of that group that we call "Latinos." The course will be divided into three major units: Caribbean, Central American, and South American Latinos. Students will read works by migrants from a range of countries, including Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Panamá, Perú, Ecuador, Uruguay and Colombia. This course will have a service-learning component. Students will be required to spend two hours per week volunteering at the local Hispanic community center Casa de Amistad. The course will be conducted in Spanish. Participation, frequent short essays, a journal, midterm, final exam, and final paper will determine the final grade.

BACK TO INDEX

 

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 20033 (Sections 01 and 02) / AFST 20716 / ESS 20203 / HESB 30422 (CBL)
Introduction to Social Problems: A Community-based Learning Approach

Christopher Morrissey

This course introduces a sociological study of some of the serious social problems plaguing society. Among these are poverty and homelessness, racial disparities, gender injustice, gross educational inequalities, interpersonal violence, and difficulties faced by prisoners upon re-entry to society. This course will give students opportunities to practice good social science by comparing theories about the causes of social problems and possible solutions to (1) empirical evidence presented in important sociological studies and (2) evidence gleaned by students through their own community-based learning experiences. To gain this first-hand knowledge, students enrolled in this course must volunteer a minimum of 20 hours during the course of the semester in a South Bend community organization dealing with one or more of these social problems.

SOC 20114 / AMST 30415 / CSC 20703 / HESB 30571 / ILS 20703 (EL)
Health and the Latino Paradox

Cynthia Duarte


The objective of this course is to enhance your awareness of major theories, concepts, issues and research studies related to the physical and mental health of Latinos in the United States. Particular attention will be drawn to the diversity of the Latino experience in the United States and the health care system in terms of country of origin, race, class, gender, and generation. This course attempts to be an introduction to the historical, political, economic and social structures that determine how a subpopulation in the United States is defined within and navigates thru a primary institution, like health care, and the ramifications of this for the society at large.

SOC 45000 (CBL)

Sociology Internships–Spring 2011

Ann R. Power                                                     

This is an experiential course designed to give students some practical experience in the area of urban affairs, social welfare, education, health care, or business, in order to test their interest, complement their academic work, or acquire work experience preparatory to future careers. Students are placed in a community agency in the South Bend area and normally work eight hours per week as interns under the supervision of an experienced practitioner. Hours are flexible, usually set to accommodate the intern's availability and the needs of the host agency. While there are no prerequisites, preference is given to Sociology majors, ALPP or SCPP majors, PSIM minors, and students who have had course work in an area related to social concerns. This is a graded course. In addition to field work, academic work includes reading scholarly works related to the field placement, periodic group meetings with the instructor and others in the course, periodic short reports, and a final paper. (For more information and/or an application, contact Ann Power at Power.4@nd.edu.)

The following is a list of agencies that have accepted interns. Students may also request placement in an agency they find on their own (subject to approval by the instructor).

CASIE Center (Child Abuse Services, Investigation and Education)

Center for Hospice and Palliative Care, St. Joseph County

Early Childhood Development Center

Family Justice Center

Good Shepherd Montessori School

Indiana Legal Services

La Casa de Amistad

Near Northwest Neighborhood Inc.

Neighborhood Development Association

Robinson Community Learning Center

Safe Station (Youth Runaway Shelter)

Salvation Army of St. Joseph County (Social Services)

Sex Offense Services, Madison Center

Sr. Maura Brannick Health Center at Chapin Street

Upward Bound

Washington High School, South Bend

BACK TO INDEX

 

THEOLOGY

THEO 13183 (Section 05) (CBL)
Theology University Seminar

Timothy Matovina


This first course in theology offers a critical study of the Bible and the early Catholic tradition. Following an introduction to the Old and New Testaments, students follow major post-biblical developments in Christian life and worship (e.g., liturgy, theology, doctrine, asceticism), emphasizing the first five centuries. For details on emphases of individual instructors, see the Department of Theology Course Description Booklet or the departmental website: www.nd.edu/~theo.

THEO 20653 (CBL)
Synergoi: The Theological Ethics of Food Cooperatives

Margaret Pfeil


This is a community-based learning course focusing on the inter-relationship of food, food security issues, the sacramentality of creation, liturgy, and the place of cooperatives in the Catholic social tradition. What does it mean for human beings to become _synergoi_, or co-operators with God's creative activity in their own local community and as responsible members of God's creation called to live sustainably? As a requirement of the course, students will work twenty hours in the local community on a neighborhood-based food co-op project, performing research of use to the local community. The course will be limited to twenty-five students and requires the permission of the instructor for registration.

THEO 20827 / THEO 20828 (EL)

Christianity and World Religions

Bradley Malkovsky

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the basic teachings and spiritualities of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam. We will approach these religions both historically and theologically, seeking to determine where they converge and differ from Christianity on such perennial issues as death, meaning, the nature of ultimate Mystery, the overcoming of suffering, etc. We will also examine some traditional and contemporary Catholic and Protestant approaches to religious pluralism. Our own search to know how the truth and experience of other faiths is related to Christian faith will be guided by the insights of important Catholic contemplatives who have entered deeply into the spirituality of other traditions. By course end we ought to have a greater understanding of what is essential to Christian faith and practice as well as a great appreciation of spiritual paths of others. The experiential learning opportunities involved are comparisons of the doctrines and spiritualities of Hinduism, Buddhism, and Islam with those of Christianity. In class we regularly practice a type of meditation that is foundational to both Hindu and Buddhist schools.

THEO 33931 / CSC 33931 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Internship: Microfinance and Social Venturing
Andrea Smith Shappell/Carl Ackermann
1 Credit THEO, 2 Credits BA
Application and interview required — 10 week internship program
Taken with BAUG 30200

The ACCION Internship is a 10 week experience with domestic ACCION offices offered to Notre Dame business students who have completed their junior year. ACCION is a non-profit, micro-lending organization with over 40 years experience reducing poverty and creating employment in the Americas. Students learn about micro-lending through marketing projects, reconciling accounts, writing reports, meeting with clients, and visiting client's places of business. To earn two credits in Business and one credit in Theology, the interns attend orientation sessions in April, complete readings and writing assignments during the summer and make a power point presentation when they return to campus.

THEO 33936 / CSC 33936 / CST 33936 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues

Andrea Smith Shappell / Margaret Pfeil

Immersion: Eight week summer service-learning placements

This three-credit hour service-learning course takes place before, during, and after student participation in eight-week summer service experiences sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Alumni Association. Students in the course reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through readings and writing, along with discussions with site supervisors, and facilitated group discussions upon return to campus. Writing assignments include 16 journal entries and a synthesis paper. The course is completed during the first four weeks of the fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory.

THEO 33938 / CSC 33938 / CST 33938 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Program: International

Rachel Tomas Morgan / Paul Kollman

This course centers around an eight-week community based learning placement in one of sixteen developing countries through the International Summer Service Learning Program. The course seeks to challenge students who have had domestic service-learning experiences to encounter global realities, examine causes of poverty, and identify strategies for social development, and gain an understanding of international social issues in light of Catholic Social Teaching. In addition to the community based learning placement, academic requirements for the course include readings and written requirements during the summer months, a re-entry weekend retreat, four re-entry sessions meeting on Thursdays from 6:30–7:45 p.m. in the fall semester, and evaluation/development of the ISSLP site and program. Students accepted into the International Summer Service Learning Program, and taking this course, are required to take THEO 33970.

THEO 33950 / CSC 33950 / CST 33950 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes (e.g., rural health care, environmental issues) at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.

THEO 33951 / CSC 33951 / CST 33951 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Washington, D.C.

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This course centers on a trip to Washington, D.C. over spring break during which time students analyze a significant social issue through contact with various agencies, government offices, and church organizations. Students participate in preparation and follow-up sessions. Themes (e.g., Educational Reform, Violence in America) vary each year.

THEO 33952 / CSC 33952 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Social Change

Cynthia Toms Smedley


This seminar allows students to participate in an experiential opportunity designed to examine contemporary social problems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.

THEO 33961 / CSC 33961 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Discernment

Michael Hebbeler

The Discernment Seminar provides senior-level undergraduate students an opportunity to reflect on their Notre Dame experience and consider postgraduate plans with one another through small-group discussion. Each session is structured to assist the students¿ exploration and articulation of their respective vocations through a variety of means, including narrative theology, spiritual direction, literature, and the arts.

THEO 33963 / CSC 33963 / CST 33963 (CBL)

Church and Social Action: Urban Plunge Seminar

Bill Purcell

The Urban Plunge is a one-credit experiential learning course designed to expose students to the sights and sounds of poverty in most major cities in the United States in close proximity to their home town. During the 48-hour immersion each student will have the opportunity to meet people affected by poverty as well as those working to eradicate it. The plunge is scheduled for two consecutive days in early January.

THEO 33965 / CSC 33965 / CST 33965 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing, Power and Hope

Jay Caponigro

Robinson Community Learning Center

Participants are invited to experience this faith-based program, and to be open to developing new perspectives on the role of neighborhood churches and organizations responding to social needs. This seminar is intended for students with previous urban experience eager to sharpen their social analysis, and to learn new forms of ministry for adults committed to social justice. Because of the unique partnership between the Sinsinawa Dominican Apostolic Volunteer Program and the Center for Social Concerns, there will be an emphasis on spirituality and community participation by all in the seminar.

THEO 33967 / CSC 33967 / CST 33967 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experiences

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This seminar is a unique immersion into the lives of migrant farm workers in Florida during the spring harvest. Students pick tomatoes in the fields (donating their wages), live with migrant families, assist church and social agencies that serve migrants, and meet with community leaders, never again to take food for granted.

THEO 33968 / CSC 33968 / CST 33968 / PSY 23852 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Communities

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This Seminar centers around travel to a L’Arche community (e. g., Toronto, Canada) to share community life with developmentally challenged persons. Students draw from the philosophy of Jean Vanier, the works of theologian Henri Nouwen, and other spiritual writings to augment this participatory learning experience.

THEO 33970 / CSC 33970 / CST 33970 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: International Issues

Rachel Tomas Morgan / Paul Kollman

This seminar serves as the required orientation course for all THEO 33938: International Service-Learning Program participants. It will provide students with an introduction to international issues in developing countries through the lens of Catholic social tradition, guidance in independent country/area study, preparation and tools for cross-cultural service, opportunities for theological reflection, logistical information necessary for international programs and travel, and general support within the context of a community of colleagues. Meets on Thursdays from 6:30–7:45 p.m. Other students participating in summer internships or research in developing countries may take the seminar with permission from the instructor.

THEO 33979 / CSC 33979 (EL)
Song, Caritas, and Social Justice: The Celebration Choir

Karen Schneider Kirner


This course allows students to integrate their faith and theology with community service/experiential learning through participation in sacred music outreach with the Notre Dame Celebration Choir under the auspices of Campus Ministry. A course goal is for students to experience the joys of service through performance of sacred music with a variety of community members, and to reflect on acts of Christian service and faith through readings from church documents, from social action theory, and on sacred music, discussing in depth such works as Pope Benedict XVI's 'Deus Caritas est' encyclical letter. Requirements include participation in weekly rehearsals, occasional weekend field service projects, keeping a journal, and a short semester-end reflective paper. To enroll, contact Choir Director Karen Schneider-Kirner (karen.kirner@nd.edu) by December 1st. A brief personal interview/audition with the director should take place before December 10th.

THEO 33995 / CSC 33995 (CBL)

Global Health Seminar

Cynthia Toms Smedley

The Center for Social Concerns, in collaboration with the Nuestros Pequenos Hermanos Holy Family Surgery Center and St. Mary's College will offer a weeklong seminar near Tegucigalpa, Honduras. During the weeklong course, students will gain exposure and insight into the medical care delivery and health conditions in rural Honduras. Students will observe orthopedic surgery. The health of populations will be considered in a global context, emphasizing health problems that transcend national borders or have a global political and economic impact. Students will examine the work of major international agencies such as the World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), Millenial Development Goals, and the World Food Programme (WFP), World Bank, and the IMF. They will also explore the work of the Church and the role of Catholic Social Teaching to address global health and the complex social forces that affect it.

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SUPPLEMENTARY MAJORS, MINORS, AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS

 

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TRADITION

CST 33936 / CSC 33936 / THEO 33936 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues

Andrea Smith Shappell / Margaret Pfeil

Immersion: Eight week summer service-learning placements

This three-credit hour service-learning course takes place before, during, and after student participation in eight-week summer service experiences sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Alumni Association. Students in the course reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through readings and writing, along with discussions with site supervisors, and facilitated group discussions upon return to campus. Writing assignments include 16 journal entries and a synthesis paper. The course is completed during the first four weeks of the fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory.

CST 33938 / CSC 33938 / THEO 33938 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Program: International

Rachel Tomas Morgan / Paul Kollman

This course centers around an eight week community based learning placement in one of sixteen developing countries through the International Summer Service Learning Program. The course seeks to challenge students who have had domestic service-learning experiences to encounter global realities, examine causes of poverty, and identify strategies for social development, and gain an understanding of international social issues in light of Catholic Social Teaching. In addition to the community based learning placement, academic requirements for the course include readings and written requirements during the summer months, a re-entry weekend retreat, four re-entry sessions meeting on Thursdays from 6:30–7:45 p.m. in the fall semester, and evaluation/development of the ISSLP site and program. Students accepted into the International Summer Service Learning Program, and taking this course, are required to take THEO 33970.

CST 33950 / CSC 33950 / THEO 33950 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes (e.g., rural health care, environmental issues) at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.

CST 33951 / CSC 33951 / THEO 33951 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Washington, D.C.

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This course centers on a trip to Washington, D.C. over spring break during which time students analyze a significant social issue through contact with various agencies, government offices, and church organizations. Students participate in preparation and follow-up sessions. Themes (e.g., Educational Reform, Violence in America) vary each year.

CST 33963 / CSC 33963 / THEO 33963 (CBL)

Church and Social Action: Urban Plunge Seminar

Bill Purcell

The Urban Plunge is a one-credit experiential learning course designed to expose students to the sights and sounds of poverty in most major cities in the United States in close proximity to their home town. During the 48-hour immersion each student will have the opportunity to meet people affected by poverty as well as those working to eradicate it. The plunge is scheduled for two consecutive days in early January.

CST 33965 / CSC 33965 / THEO 33965 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing, Power and Hope

Jay Caponigro

Robinson Community Learning Center

Participants are invited to experience this faith-based program, and to be open to developing new perspectives on the role of neighborhood churches and organizations responding to social needs. This seminar is intended for students with previous urban experience eager to sharpen their social analysis, and to learn new forms of ministry for adults committed to social justice. Because of the unique partnership between the Sinsinawa Dominican Apostolic Volunteer Program and the Center for Social Concerns, there will be an emphasis on spirituality and community participation by all in the seminar.

CST 33967 / CSC 33967 / THEO 33967 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experiences

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This seminar is a unique immersion into the lives of migrant farm workers in Florida during the spring harvest. Students pick tomatoes in the fields (donating their wages), live with migrant families, assist church and social agencies that serve migrants, and meet with community leaders, never again to take food for granted.

CST 33968 / CSC 33968 / PSY 23852 / THEO 33968 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Communities

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This Seminar centers around travel to a L’Arche community (e. g., Toronto, Canada) to share community life with developmentally challenged persons. Students draw from the philosophy of Jean Vanier, the works of theologian Henri Nouwen, and other spiritual writings to augment this participatory learning experience.

CST 33970 / CSC 33970 / THEO 33970 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: International Issues

Rachel Tomas Morgan / Paul Kollman

This seminar serves as the required orientation course for all THEO 33938: International Service-Learning Program participants. It will provide students with an introduction to international issues in developing countries through the lens of Catholic social tradition, guidance in independent country/area study, preparation and tools for cross-cultural service, opportunities for theological reflection, logistical information necessary for international programs and travel, and general support within the context of a community of colleagues. Meets Thursdays 6:30–7:45 p.m. Other students participating in summer internships or research in developing countries may take the seminar with permission from the instructor.

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COMPUTER APPLICATIONS

CAPP 30515 (EL)

Systems Analysis and Design

Louis Berzai

Administered in two major segments, the course first exposes students to the full scope of analyzing and designing computer systems by covering problem definition, data collection, documentation of existing systems, and definition of new systems requirements. We use the methodology of Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC). The second segment deals first with students working on genuine business projects. The second phase of this segment gets into object-oriented systems analysis, which is a new concept in systems analysis and design.

CAPP 45565 (Sections 01 and 02) (CBL)
Internship

Louis Berzai

The course description for this course is slightly different for each section. CAPP 45565 Section 01 Internship. This encompasses working with various civic, public and or private organizations using acquired computer applications knowledge and skills. Credit is given only if work is done in the Information Systems area of an organization.

CAPP 45565 Section 02 CAPP/TBS Community Service Internship. This internship was created to allow an interested CAPP/TBS student to lend their skills and talents to a worthy cause in our local community.

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EDUCATION, SCHOOLING, AND SOCIETY

ESS 20203 / AFST 20716 / HESB 30422 / SOC 20033 (Sections 01 and 02) (CBL)
Introduction to Social Problems: A Community-based Learning Approach

Christopher Morrissey

This course introduces a sociological study of some of the serious social problems plaguing society. Among these are poverty and homelessness, racial disparities, gender injustice, gross educational inequalities, interpersonal violence, and difficulties faced by prisoners upon re-entry to society. This course will give students opportunities to practice good social science by comparing theories about the causes of social problems and possible solutions to (1) empirical evidence presented in important sociological studies and (2) evidence gleaned by students through their own community-based learning experiences. To gain this first-hand knowledge, students enrolled in this course must volunteer a minimum of 20 hours during the course of the semester in a South Bend community organization dealing with one or more of these social problems.

ESS 30611 (CBL)

Tutoring in the Community

Nancy Masters

This class is offered for students who are taking part in any of the campus-wide tutoring programs, such as Teamwork for Tomorrow, SAINTS, Our Lady’s Helpers, etc. The class is a one-credit, S/U course that provides an overview of teaching methods for the tutoring setting. Arrangements for tutoring can be made prior to the start of class by contacting Nancy Masters at nmasters@nd.edu.

ESS 33604 (CBL)
Strategies for Instructing Children in the Community

Stuart Greene / Sarah Lamphier

ESS 33604 is a one credit seminar for students who want to serve as Student Learning Specialists with the No Parent Left Behind program in the South Bend community. This seminar will give students the necessary tools to create and implement effective learning activities with children in need. We will primarily focus on prior knowledge assessment, literacy acquisition and basic math skills. Strategies for Instruction will also prepare students to invite parents into their children's education and intellectual growth, so the effective learning strategies begun by the Student Learning Specialist can be continued and reinforced in the home.

ESS 33623 (CBR)  

Community-Based Research in Parent Involvement

Joyce Long

This Community-Based Research (CBR) in Education course is focused on one problem expressed by administrators in our local urban schools: lack of parent involvement. Like CSI forensic members, we will be working collaboratively with community members (parents, teacher, administrators, South Bend Community School Corporation students) to determine how to improve parent involvement. We will study existing research on the topic, collect and analyze data at multiple school sites, draw conclusions, and create recommendations. Previous research experience is helpful (but not necessary), an interest in educational issues is required.

ESS 35623 (CBR)
Community Based Research in Education

Stuart Greene


This Community-Based Research (CBR) in Education course is focused on one community issues: lack of parent involvement in local urban schools. Like CSI forensic members, we will be working collaboratively with community members (parents, teacher, administrators, South Bend Community School Corporation students) to determine how to improve parent involvement. Students in this course will be formulating a literature review, creating surveys and interview protocols, collecting data at multiple school sites, and analyzing data to create a final research report for the local school corporation. Although previous research experience is helpful (but not necessary), an interest in educational issues is required.


ESS 35600 (CBL/CBR)
Field Experience in Education: Internships in K–12 Teaching

Nancy McAdams

This internship is designed to provide an experience that will broaden students' knowledge of teaching and learning through field experience in local K–12 classrooms. Students will spend three hours each week in the classroom. The hours are flexible. Students need not be ESS minors to enroll in the course. Academic work includes occasional reflections and short readings.


ESS 35608 (CBL)
Practicum in Coaching

Darin Thomas

The practicum involves supervised work experience in various athletic settings. Students will demonstrate effective coaching through the submission of evidence-based documentation. Students must complete both the principles and foundations courses before doing the practicum. The student will have directed supervision in coaching. The student will pick a sport that s/he is interested in coaching. After approval of the cooperating coach and the director of coaching, the student will be granted a coaching practicum under direct supervision of the cooperating coach/supervisor. Periodic interactive meetings will be held to discussion the experience with other students and experienced coaches.

ESS 40263 (CBL)
Autism

Thomas Whitman


This seminar discusses topics related to developmental disabilities, with a special emphasis on pervasive developmental disorders and autism. Issues regarding their definition, etiology, and treatment are also discussed.

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HESBURGH PROGRAM

HESB 30422 / AFST 20716 / ESS 20203 / SOC 20033 (Sections 01 and 02) (CBL)
Introduction to Social Problems: A Community-based Learning Approach

Christopher Morrissey

This course introduces a sociological study of some of the serious social problems plaguing society. Among these are poverty and homelessness, racial disparities, gender injustice, gross educational inequalities, interpersonal violence, and difficulties faced by prisoners upon re-entry to society. This course will give students opportunities to practice good social science by comparing theories about the causes of social problems and possible solutions to (1) empirical evidence presented in important sociological studies and (2) evidence gleaned by students through their own community-based learning experiences. To gain this first-hand knowledge, students enrolled in this course must volunteer a minimum of 20 hours during the course of the semester in a South Bend community organization dealing with one or more of these social problems.

HESB 30571 / AMST 30415 / CSC 20703 / ILS 20703 / SOC 20114 (EL)
Health and the Latino Paradox

Cynthia Duarte


The objective of this course is to enhance your awareness of major theories, concepts, issues and research studies related to the physical and mental health of Latinos in the United States. Particular attention will be drawn to the diversity of the Latino experience in the United States and the health care system in terms of country of origin, race, class, gender, and generation. This course attempts to be an introduction to the historical, political, economic and social structures that determine how a subpopulation in the United States is defined within and navigates thru a primary institution, like health care, and the ramifications of this for the society at large.

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MENDOZA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

 

ACCOUNTANCY

ACCT 40660 (CBL)

Tax Assistance Program

Ken Milani

Preparing income tax returns for low-income individuals is the primary purpose of the Tax Assistance Program. An introductory Federal Income Tax course is a prerequisite. The course begins with four weeks of classes that focus on tax issues that are important when helping low-income individuals (e.g., determining filing status, calculating the child credit, computing the earned income credit). Following the class sessions, students are assigned to specific locations in South Bend or Mishawaka where the returns are prepared. Certified public accountants are available at several locations to help with complex matters. The Tax Assistance Program has been operating since 1972. The course is a two-credit hour offering graded using a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory scale.

ACCT 40670 (CBL)

Tax Assistance Program: Administrative Elements

Ken Milani

This course is designed for students participating in the Tax Assistance Program for the second time. Administrative elements of the Tax Assistance Program (e. g, coordinating, organizing, scheduling) will be emphasized in this offering in addition to the tax compliance activities. Students enrolling in this course will handle administrative responsibilities in the Tax Assistance Program (e.g., Chairperson, Logistics Director, Public Relations Director) as well as being involved in the preparation of income tax returns for individuals. The course is a two-credit hour offering graded using a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory scale.

ACCT 70691 (CBL)

Income Taxation of International Individuals

Ken Milani

Income Taxation of International Individuals is a graduate course that includes participation in the Tax Assistance Program as a requirement of the course. The graduate students involved in the course prepare income tax returns for foreign students and international scholars at Notre Dame. In 2008, more than 700 taxpayers were helped and over 1,300 (federal and state) income tax returns were prepared.

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MANAGEMENT

MGT 30630 (CBR)

Systems Analysis and Design of Information Systems

Daewon Sun

An in-depth study of the analysis and design of information processing systems. One of the projects is Analysis and Design of Information Systems in Community Service Organizations where the students will determine the problems and opportunities of the current system used in the social organizations, provide a business model of the system, recommend a revised model, and create a prototype of the revised model, usually a database management system on Microsoft Access. All work completed will be documented and submitted to the social organization for future reference and implementation.

Participants in the past included the following:

Center for the Homeless

DISMAS House of Michiana

Habitat for Humanity

La Casa de Amistad

Women’s Care Center

YWCA

MGT 40700 (CBL/EL)
Project Management

Corey Angst

Whether you become a high-profile real estate developer, an investment banker, or an entrepreneur, in any career you'll need some project management skills to get your job done. Everyone tries to get projects finished on time and under budget, but many critical business projects fail anyway. We'll learn the steps associated with successful project management, examine some optimization techniques, learn how to use the software tools that enhance productivity, and discuss how to avoid the implementation pitfalls that cause good people doing good projects to fail.

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BUSINESS ETHICS

BAET 30510 (EL)
United Nations Global Compact

Oliver Williams


In place of the spring 2011 course on the UN Global Compact, students are invited to get credit for the course by attending a major conference at Notre Dame titled THE UN MILLENNIUM DEVELOPMENT GOALS, THE GLOBAL COMPACT AND THE COMMON GOOD, opening Sunday evening, March 20, and closing Tuesday noon, March 22, 2011. Over a dozen multinational companies will make presentations at the conference along with university scholars, government officials and key officials at the United Nations. Students who are interested in the globalization of the economy and the career possibilities of Sustainability/CSR/Corporate Citizenship are invited to network with business leaders.

Students will be assigned several background readings and then attend a total of five daytime and/or evening sessions at the conference. A choice is given to a student who registers for the class so that one does not have to miss other classes. As the time of the conference approaches, a program will be provided for students registered for the course so that s/he can determine which industry or academic speakers most interest him/her.

In addition to attendance at five sessions, students must also write a five to seven page paper integrating the readings with sessions and participate in a discussion of the papers about two weeks after the conference.

BAET 40540 (EL)
Ethical Leadership in the Sustainable Enterprise

Ante Glavas and Tamo Chattopadhay


The course focuses on how to integrate sustainability and social entrepreneurship into business. While the course complements existing offerings in business ethics and sustainability, it incorporates a unique focus on identifying and pursuing careers in sustainable business and macro-level concerns including leadership and integration within multiple business contexts. It is intended for students who will be working in the business sector and are wondering how to integrate personal values, Notre Dame's mission, and learning from Mendoza classes into their daily business lives after they graduate.


The first part of the course will focus on how sustainability and social entrepreneurship is a path for living out the mission and values of Notre Dame in business. The second part of the course will be centered on real life examples through case studies, videos, and guest speakers. The third and final part of the course will focus on individual planning of how to integrate into future careers.


The course will not provide all the answers to integrating into business careers but rather give a broad overview and numerous resources for further exploration that can be used for many years to come. The goal is to start off careers with the proper guidance so that students can be lifelong practitioners of sustainability and social entrepreneurship.

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

CIVIL ENGINEERING

CE 25600 / 35600 / 45600 Civil Engineering Service Projects

Civil Engineering Service Projects (CESP) partners students with community organizations to put their engineering skills into service. Currently the community partner is Bridges2Prosperity, a nonprofit organization providing pedestrian bridges to communities worldwide who lack such basic infrastructure. Under the banner of the NDSeed program, six to seven students will be accepted each academic year for this course and will supervise all aspects of bridge design and construction, including fundraising and international study via site surveys over Fall Break and construction in May following the spring semester. To join this course in the fall of any academic year, students must apply and be accepted to NDSeed in the prior spring semester. Students are expected to participate in the course for a full academic year, through bridge construction in May. The project is also affiliated with the Center for Social Concerns International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP) and has additional curricular requirements through ISSLP. See www.nd.edu/~ndseed for more information.

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COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

BIOLOGY

BIOS 40450 (CBL/EL)

Developing Health Networks in Rare and Neglected Disease

Kasturi Haldar

A main purpose of this course is to engage upper level undergraduate and graduate students in clinical research in rare and neglected diseases. The focus for each semester is on neglected/infectious diseases with emphasis on worldwide eradication strategies. A major goal is to have Notre Dame students work on a clinical research project in class on some rare and/or neglected disease of major importance. A second important goal of this course is to develop an analogous model(s) for other neglected/infectious diseases. We hope this class will also help the students become advocates for these diseases. The course is also tied to a clinical-translational seminar series to enable students to meet with leading international experts who work in neglected diseases. The class is intended for juniors and seniors.

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CENTERS AND INSTITUTES

 

CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS

CSC 20703 / AMST 30415 / HESB 30571 / ILS 20703 / SOC 20114 (EL)
Health and the Latino Paradox

Cynthia Duarte


The objective of this course is to enhance your awareness of major theories, concepts, issues and research studies related to the physical and mental health of Latinos in the United States. Particular attention will be drawn to the diversity of the Latino experience in the United States and the health care system in terms of country of origin, race, class, gender, and generation. This course attempts to be an introduction to the historical, political, economic and social structures that determine how a subpopulation in the United States is defined within and navigates thru a primary institution, like health care, and the ramifications of this for the society at large.

CSC 23090 / PSY 23090 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Children and Poverty Seminar

Kalsea Koss / Mary Wagner Fuhs / Susan Gunderson / Jay Brandenberger

This course is a unique opportunity for student participants to examine important issues, both domestic and international, with respect to children and youth challenged by poverty and related concerns. The Seminar will focus in particular on early intervention and prevention, education, public policy, and community outreach. Participants will begin their exploration during orientation sessions, where the current state of children in poverty will be examined from multiple perspectives and within different domains. Students will help present relevant organizations and issues to the group during the orientation sessions in order to prepare for the visits in New York City.

During a week of immersion in New York City, participants will learn from individuals and community-based organizations. Visits with both children and program administrators will enable participants to experience first-hand the realities of growing up in poverty. In addition, the learning opportunities uniquely presented by New York City will be jointly utilized to enhance the experience.

CSC 23855 / PSY 23855 (EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Take Ten

Ellen Kyes


Take Ten is a research-based violence prevention program and curriculum designed at the Robinson Community Learning Center. Volunteers work on a weekly basis with schoolchildren of all grades to teach them the skills needed to resolve conflict peacefully. Take Ten's mission is to provide youth with positive alternatives to violence and build their capacity to make more informed choices when faced with conflict. Students participating in the Take Ten seminar will serve as Take Ten volunteers during the semester (February through April with training in January),being part of a team that works at a school in the area one time per week. Additionally, the readings and reflections will allow students to focus on understanding issues of youth and violence from various perspectives. Contact: Ellen Kyes at epaul@nd.edu. Approval required. Apply at Robinson Community Learning Center.


CSC 30950 (CBL)
Appalachia: Workshop in Creative Nonfiction

Benjamin Giamo


The Workshop in Creative Nonfiction is designed for students in the Appalachian Seminar who want to deepen and extend their immersion experiences. Prior to the immersion, we will read some relevant material to help with your preparation. For instance, portions of James Agee's and Walker Evans' "Let Us Now Praise Famous Men," which details their time spent with three sharecropper families in Hale County, Alabama, in the summer of 1936, will provide a classic nonfiction example of both process and genre. While in Appalachia, you will keep a journal to document and reflect upon your activities and encounters. Upon returning, we will work to transform your experience into an engaging nonfiction account. In doing so, we will pay attention to how forces and values manifest themselves in individual lives, families, and communities. Whether socioeconomic, political, religious, or cultural, such forces get under the skin and shape the thoughts and actions of people in everyday settings. In transforming experience into expression, we will afford people particular documentary scrutiny and strive to realize a compelling final product that bears witness to life, identity, and region. Application available at: www.socialconcerns.nd.edu/academic/fall

CSC 33931 / THEO 33931 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Internship: Microfinance and Social Venturing
Andrea Smith Shappell/Carl Ackermann
1 Credit THEO, 2 Credits BA
Application and interview required — 10 week internship program
Taken with BAUG 30200

The ACCION Internship is a 10 week experience with domestic ACCION offices offered to Notre Dame business students who have completed their junior year. ACCION is a non-profit, micro-lending organization with over 40 years experience reducing poverty and creating employment in the Americas. Students learn about micro-lending through marketing projects, reconciling accounts, writing reports, meeting with clients, and visiting client's places of business. To earn two credits in Business and one credit in Theology, the interns attend orientation sessions in April, complete readings and writing assignments during the summer and make a power point presentation when they return to campus.

CSC 33936 / CST 33936 / THEO 33936 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues

Andrea Smith Shappell / Margaret Pfeil

Immersion: Eight week summer service-learning placements

This three-credit hour service-learning course takes place before, during, and after student participation in eight-week summer service experiences sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Alumni Association. Students in the course reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through readings and writing, along with discussions with site supervisors, and facilitated group discussions upon return to campus. Writing assignments include 16 journal entries and a synthesis paper. The course is completed during the first four weeks of the fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory.

CSC 33938 / CST 33938 / THEO 33938 (CBL)

Summer Service Learning Program: International

Rachel Tomas Morgan / Paul Kollman

This course center’s around an eight week community based learning placement in one of sixteen developing countries through the International Summer Service Learning Program. The course seeks to challenge students who have had domestic service-learning experiences to encounter global realities, examine causes of poverty and identify strategies for social development, and gain an understanding of international social issues in light of Catholic Social Teaching. In addition to the community based learning placement, academic requirements for the course include readings and written requirements during the summer months, a re-entry weekend retreat, four re-entry sessions meeting on Thursdays from 6:30–7:45 p.m. in the fall semester, and evaluation/development of the ISSLP site and program. Students accepted into the International Summer Service Learning Program, and taking this course, are also required to take THEO 33970.

CSC 33950 / CST 33950 / THEO 33950 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

Connie Mick

One week immersion required

This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes (e.g., rural health care, environmental issues) at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.

CSC 33951 / CST 33951 / THEO 33951 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Washington, D.C.

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This course centers on a trip to Washington, D.C. over spring break during which time students analyze a significant social issue through contact with various agencies, government offices, and church organizations. Students participate in preparation and follow-up sessions. Themes (e.g., Educational Reform, Violence in America) vary each year.

CSC 33952 / THEO 33952 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Social Change

Cynthia Toms Smedley


This seminar allows students to participate in an experiential opportunity designed to examine contemporary social problems. Emphasis will be placed on understanding issues/conflicts from the perspective of the various participants. Preparation and follow-up sessions are tailored to the specific opportunity.


CSC 33961 / THEO 33961 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Discernment

Michael Hebbeler

The Discernment Seminar provides senior-level undergraduate students an opportunity to reflect on their Notre Dame experience and consider postgraduate plans with one another through small-group discussion. Each session is structured to assist the students¿ exploration and articulation of their respective vocations through a variety of means, including narrative theology, spiritual direction, literature, and the arts.

CSC 33963 / CST 33963 / THEO 33963 (CBL)

Church and Social Action: Urban Plunge Seminar

Bill Purcell

The Urban Plunge is a one-credit experiential learning course designed to expose students to the sights and sounds of poverty in most major cities in the United States in close proximity to their home town. During the 48-hour immersion each student will have the opportunity to meet people affected by poverty as well as those working to eradicate it. The plunge is scheduled for two consecutive days in early January.

CSC 33965 / CST 33965 / THEO 33965 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Organizing, Power and Hope

Jay Caponigro

Robinson Community Learning Center

Participants are invited to experience this faith-based program, and to be open to developing new perspectives on the role of neighborhood churches and organizations responding to social needs. This seminar is intended for students with previous urban experience eager to sharpen their social analysis, and to learn new forms of ministry for adults committed to social justice. Because of the unique partnership between the Sinsinawa Dominican Apostolic Volunteer Program and the Center for Social Concerns, there will be an emphasis on spirituality and community participation by all in the seminar.

CSC 33966 (EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Border Issues

Cynthia Toms Smedley

Credit hours: 1


This seminar will expose students to diverse perspectives about México-U.S. border and immigration issues. During the fall break students will travel to the Southern Arizona borderlands and will attend legal proceedings focused on immigration, participate in humanitarian service efforts for migrants, hear religious leaders discuss their current and past border ministry work, and travel through the desert and ports of entry assuming that security is not an issue.

CSC 33967 / CST 33967 / THEO 33967 (CBL)

Social Concerns Seminar: Migrant Experiences

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This seminar is a unique immersion into the lives of migrant farm workers in Florida during the spring harvest. Students pick tomatoes in the fields (donating their wages), live with migrant families, assist church and social agencies that serve migrants, and meet with community leaders, never again to take food for granted.

CSC 33968 / CST 33968 / PSY 23852 / THEO 33968 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: L’Arche Communities

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This Seminar centers around travel to a L’Arche community (e. g. , Toronto, Canada) to share community life with developmentally challenged persons. Students draw from the philosophy of Jean Vanier, the works of theologian Henri Nouwen, and other spiritual writings to augment this participatory learning experience.

CSC 33970 / CST 33970 / THEO 33970 (EL)

Social Concerns Seminar: International Issues

Rachel Tomas Morgan / Paul Kollman

This seminar serves as the required orientation course for all THEO 33938: International Service-Learning Program participants. It will provide students with an introduction to international issues in developing countries through the lens of Catholic social tradition, guidance in independent country/area study, preparation and tools for cross-cultural service, opportunities for theological reflection, logistical information necessary for international programs and travel, and general support within the context of a community of colleagues. Meets Thursdays 6:30–7:45 p.m. Other students participating in summer internships or research in developing countries may take the seminar with permission from the instructor.

CSC 33976 (EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Environmental Justice and Human Rights in the Gulf Coast

Cynthia Toms Smedley


Set in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, and centered on a journey to Louisiana during spring break, this Seminar explores domestic environmental issues from the perspective of minority communities that suffered due to Hurricane Katrina. Examines historical, political, and economic issues that created a culture of poverty in such areas. After defining key concepts such as environmental racism, culture of poverty, justice, and equality, students will consider specific issues of waste pollution and exposure to toxic substances emitted from chemical plants built in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Apply through the Center for Social Concerns.

CSC 33978 (EL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Urban Poverty and Causes of Homelessness

Cynthia Toms Smedley

Over 16,000 people, including more than 2,000 children, live without adequate food and shelter in the state of Oregon. Although the city of Portland, Oregon manages to provide shelter for almost half of this population, the number of individuals affected by poverty and homelessness continues to rise. This seminar examines the many myths associated with homelessness and explores the larger cycle of urban poverty from diverse interdisciplinary perspectives.

CSC 33979 / THEO 33979 (EL)
Song, Caritas, and Social Justice: The Celebration Choir

Karen Schneider Kirner


This course allows students to integrate their faith and theology with community service/experiential learning through participation in sacred music outreach with the Notre Dame Celebration Choir under the auspices of Campus Ministry. A course goal is for students to experience the joys of service through performance of sacred music with a variety of community members, and to reflect on acts of Christian service and faith through readings from church documents, from social action theory, and on sacred music, discussing in depth such works as Pope Benedict XVI's 'Deus Caritas est' encyclical letter. Requirements include participation in weekly rehearsals, occasional weekend field service projects, keeping a journal, and a short semester-end reflective paper. To enroll, contact Choir Director Karen Schneider-Kirner (karen.kirner@nd.edu) by December 1st. A brief personal interview/audition with the director should take place before December 10th.

CSC 33981 (CBL)
Leading with Community: Practicum in Social Concerns Seminars

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This seminar will be aimed to improve overall seminar leader training by utilizing Center expertise and making program training more congruent across seminars. Students leading seminars in the spring–fall 2010 will enroll in a spring leadership seminar. The seminar will hold approximately 4–6 large classes around a particular leadership theme, led by a different CSC person. The format for the class will be a 30 minute training session, then breaking into small groups for particular seminar application or peer input. Unique features: This seminar will be hosted by the Experiential Learning Council which provides funding as well as student input. Since this seminar has been requested by students and many students have expressed interest, the curriculum will be heavily dictated/coordinated by student leaders. Also, there will be time budgeted for previous seminar leaders (from fall–spring 2009) to work with new seminar leaders on specific details of the seminar and itinerary.The immersion portion of this seminar is the student's participation as a seminar leader.

CSC 33992 (CBL)
Ethical Leadership Through Service and Civic Engagement

Connie Mick

This first-year course is designed to continue to develop the key characteristics of Hesburgh-Yusko Scholars: academic excellence, moral character, successful leadership, and commitment to service. Students sharpen their awareness of global social concerns through tracking and analysis of current events informed by interdisciplinary research on the historical causes of and responses to those events. As that understanding deepens, students move into the future tense: how they can propose and participate in solutions to those issues. The UN Millennium Development Goals stand as one framework from which students identify global challenges and opportunities for leadership, focusing on how disciplined foresight can help establish indicators of progress that move communities toward a preferred future, one defined by justice for all.In order to interrogate the nature of service as a form of leadership, students engage in a range of community-based learning-direct service at local agencies, experiential learning through contact with local experts (University and community-based), and a final project employing community-based research methods. This course emphasizes the development of communication skills—written, oral, and multimodal—as central to reflecting on sound decision making, conducting effective community-based research, and persuading stakeholders to invest in proposed solutions. In short, students consider and express the importance of ethical leadership through intellect, action, and word.

CSC 33994 (CBL)
Appalachia Advanced Topics

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This course allows students to explore social issues of the Appalachia region through community-based learning. Students expand on the Appalachia Seminar course through examining the socio-economic, cultural, and policy issues facing the region. The course will feature rotating focal points including: integration of Catholic Social Teaching, healthcare, environmental stewardship, and poverty studies. During the week in Appalachia students learn from individuals and community-based organizations; follow-up classes facilitate analysis and synthesis of insights gained during the week.

CSC 33995 / THEO 33995 (CBL)

Global Health Seminar

Cynthia Toms Smedley

The Center for Social Concerns, in collaboration with the Nuestros Pequenos Hermanos Holy Family Surgery Center and St. Mary's College will offer a weeklong seminar near Tegucigalpa, Honduras. During the weeklong course, students will gain exposure and insight into the medical care delivery and health conditions in rural Honduras. Students will observe orthopedic surgery. The health of populations will be considered in a global context, emphasizing health problems that transcend national borders or have a global political and economic impact. Students will examine the work of major international agencies such as the World Health Organization (WHO), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), Millenial Development Goals, and the World Food Programme (WFP), World Bank, and the IMF. They will also explore the work of the Church and the role of Catholic Social Teaching to address global health and the complex social forces that affect it.

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INSTITUTE FOR LATINO STUDIES

ILS 20703 / AMST 30415 / CSC 20703 / HESB 30571 / SOC 20114 (EL)
Health and the Latino Paradox

Cynthia Duarte


The objective of this course is to enhance your awareness of major theories, concepts, issues and research studies related to the physical and mental health of Latinos in the United States. Particular attention will be drawn to the diversity of the Latino experience in the United States and the health care system in terms of country of origin, race, class, gender, and generation. This course attempts to be an introduction to the historical, political, economic and social structures that determine how a subpopulation in the United States is defined within and navigates thru a primary institution, like health care, and the ramifications of this for the society at large.


ILS 40910 / AFST 43575 / LAST 40428 / ROSP 40876 (CBL)
Race and Ethnicity in U.S. Latino/a Literature

Marisel Moreno


In this course, students will examine the key issues of race and ethnicity in U.S. Latina/o literary production, particularly in the works of Afro-Latina/o, Andean-Latina/o (and other Latinos of indigenous descent), and Asian-Latina/o authors. The range of races, ethnicities, and nationalities of the established and emerging authors studied in the course will enhance the students' understanding of the complexity and heterogeneity of that group that we call "Latinos." The course will be divided into three major units: Caribbean, Central American, and South American Latinos. Students will read works by migrants from a range of countries, including Puerto Rico, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Guatemala, El Salvador, Costa Rica, Panamá, Perú, Ecuador, Uruguay and Colombia. This course will have a service-learning component. Students will be required to spend two hours per week volunteering at the local Hispanic community center Casa de Amistad. The course will be conducted in Spanish. Participation, frequent short essays, a journal, midterm, final exam, and final paper will determine the final grade.

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