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Fall 2010 Community-Based Learning Course Guide

Community-Based Course Opportunities


The following courses are being offered in the Fall Semester 2010. They have been listed by department. To view the courses click on the department in the index below and you will be directed to the Community-based departmental course listings.

Experiential Learning (EL) classes put students in direct contact with some aspect of the issues being studied in their coursework. The off-campus area offers sites for learning, but students don't necessarily engage in service.

Through a Community-Based Learning (CBL) course, students contribute to the community beyond the campus. Their experiences are integrated into class like a reading assignment, providing them with an additional text for consideration during class discussions and in written assignments.

Community-Based Research (CBR) involves students in an investigation of a question of concern to an non-profit community organization. The results of the study are intended to assist the organization.


Fall 2010 Course Index


FIRST YEAR OF STUDIES

FIRST YEAR COMPOSITION
FYC 13200 (CBL) Bridging the Gap: Community and the Rhetoric of Idealism

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS

ANTHROPOLOGY
ANTH 34320 (CBL) Introduction to Ireland
ANTH 45030 (CBL/CBR) Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study

ART, ART HISTORY, AND DESIGN
DESN 41103 (CBR) Graphic Design III

COLLEGE SEMINAR
CSEM 23101 (CBL) Poverty and Politics
CSEM 23101 (CBR) Labor, Race, and the Struggle for Dignity
CSEM 23101 (CBL) Disability

EAST ASIAN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES
LLEA 20145 Appreciating World Music

GENDER STUDIES
GSC 45001-01 (CBL) Gender Studies Senior Internship

HESBURGH PROGRAM IN PUBLIC SERVICE
HESB 30451 (CBL) Leadership, Ethics, and Social Responsibility
HESB 43537 (CBR) Environmental Justice

HISTORY
HIST 34430 (CBL) Introduction to Ireland

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
LAST 40650 (CBL/CBR) Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study

PHILOSOPHY
PHIL 43308 (CBR) Environmental Justice

POLITICAL SCIENCE
POLS 35901 (CBL/CBR) Internships

PSYCHOLOGY
PSY 25270 (CBL) Practicum in Developmental Disabilities
PSY 43247 (CBL) Leadership, Ethics, and Social Responsibility
PSY 43271 (CBL) Seminar in Autism
PSY 44370 (CBL) Developmental Disabilities: Integrating Theory and Practice

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES
ROSP 40875 (CBL) Migrant Voices

SOCIOLOGY
SOC 24720 (CBL) Developmental Disabilities: Integrating Theory and Practice
SOC 34123 (CBL) Introduction to Ireland
SOC 43691 (CBL) Religion and Social Activism
SOC 45000 (CBL) Sociology Internships

THEOLOGY
THEO 13183 (CBL) Theology University Seminar
THEO 20625 (CBL) Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice
THEO 20643 (CBL) The Askesis of Nonviolence: Theology and Practice
THEO 33931 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Internship: Microfinance and Social Venturing
THEO 33933 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Internship: Latino Leadership Intern Program
THEO 33936 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues
THEO 33938 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: International
THEO 33950 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia
THEO 33951 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Washington, D.C.
THEO 33959 (CBL) Latino Community Organizing Against Violence Seminar
THEO 33961 (EL) Discernment Seminar
THEO 33962 (CBL) Gospel of Life Seminar
THEO 34605 (CBL/EL) London Program Internship in Catholic Social Teaching

SUPPLEMENTARY MAJORS, MINORS, AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TRADITION

CST 20625 (CBL) Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice
CST 20643 (CBL) The Askesis of Nonviolence: Theology and Practice
CST 30505 (CBL) Micro-venturing I for Business Students
CST 43308 (CBR) Environmental Justice

CST 33936* (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues
CST 33938* (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: International
CST 33950* (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia
CST 33951* (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Washington, D.C.
CST 33966* (EL) Border Issues Seminar

*This course holds the CST Minor attribute and can be counted toward the CST Minor

EDUCATION, SCHOOLING, AND SOCIETY
ESS 30611 (CBL) Tutoring in the Community
ESS 30623 (CBR) Community-Based Research in Education
ESS 34350 (CBL) Developmental Disabilities: Integrating Theory and Practice
ESS 35623 (CBL) Practicum in Developmental Disabilities
ESS 40263 (CBL) Seminar in Autism
ESS 45652 (CBL/CBR) Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study

INSTITUTE FOR LATINO STUDIES
ILS 35801 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Internship: Latino Leadership Intern Program

ILS 40907 (CBL) Migrant Voices
ILS 45103 (CBL/CBR) Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study

MENDOZA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
BAET 40300 (CBL) Business Ethics Field Project

BAMG 30505 (CBL) Micro-venturing I for Business Students
BAUG 30505 (CBL) Micro-venturing I for Non-Business Students

MANAGEMENT
MGT 30630 (CBR) Systems Analysis and Design of Information Systems

MARKETING
MARK 30120 (CBR) Marketing Research

NOTRE DAME MBA
MBGR 76057-01 (CBL) Leadership in Education: Teaching Financial Literacy

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
CSE 20600 (CBL/CBR) Engineering Projects in Community Service
EG 20600 (CBL/CBR) Engineering Projects in Community Service

LAW SCHOOL

LAW SCHOOL
LAW 75721 (CBL) Legal Aid I and Ethics

COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
BIOS 50544 (CBR) Environmental Justice

CHEMISTRY
CHEM 30331 (CBR) Chemistry in Service of the Community

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND VALUES
STV 33401 (CBR) Animal Welfare and the Human-Animal Bond Community-Based Learning Seminar
BIOS 43396 (CBR) Environmental Justice

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE
ARCH 51411-01 (CBR) Restoration and Historic Preservation Concentration
ARCH 53411-01 (CBR) Restoration and Historic Preservation Concentration
ARCH 81151 (EL) Urban Design II

CENTERS AND INSTITUTES

CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS
CSC 30623 (CBR) Community-Based Research in Education
CSC 33401 (CBR) Animal Welfare and the Human-Animal Bond Community-Based Learning Seminar
CSC 33931 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Internship: Microfinance and Social Venturing
CSC 33933 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Internship: Latino Leadership Intern Program
CSC 33936 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues
CSC 33938 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Program: International
CSC 33950 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia
CSC 33951 (CBL) Social Concerns Seminar: Washington, D.C.
CSC 33959 (CBL) Latino Community Organizing Against Violence Seminar
CSC 33961 (EL) Discernment Seminar
CSC 33962 (CBL) Gospel of Life Seminar
CSC 33699 (EL) Border Issues Seminar
CSC 33985 (CBL) Energy Policy, Environment, & Social Change Seminar
CSC 34604 (CBL/EL) London Program Internship in Catholic Social Teaching

INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATIONAL INITIATIVES
EDU 73886, Sections 01 and 02 (CBR) Action Research in Catholic Schools I

INSTITUTE FOR IRISH STUDIES
IRST 24208 (CBL) Introduction to Ireland

INSTITUTE FOR LATINO STUDIES
ILS 35801 (CBL) Summer Service Learning Internship: Latino Leadership Intern Program
ILS 45103 (CBL/CBR) Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study

KROC INSTITUTE FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACE STUDIES

IIPS 20729 (CBL) The Askesis of Nonviolence: Theology and Practice
IIPS 30924 (CBL) Micro-venturing I for Non-Business Students
IIPS 50901 (CBR) Environmental Justice

 

Fall 2010 Course Descriptions



FIRST YEAR OF STUDIES

FIRST YEAR COMPOSITION

FYC 13200 (CBL)
Bridging the Gap: Community and the Rhetoric of Idealism

Ed Kelly


Bridging the Gap focuses on critical reading and writing, community building, and service. It asks students to use close reading skills and experience in community and volunteer service to ground and inform the argumentative essays they generate. In addition to standard FYC goals, there are three others for this course: 1) to foster a genuine spirit of community in the classroom; 2) to deepen student understanding of selected social justice issues; and 3) to promote learning through service. Service opportunities include tutoring local students (including the homeless and detained) or working with the elderly.

BACK TO INDEX

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND LETTERS

ANTHROPOLOGY

 

ANTH 34320 / HIST 34430 / SOC 34123 / IRST 24208 (CBL)
Introduction to Ireland

ND Keough Center Course: Kevin Whelan

This class focuses on the evolution of Irish culture from the eighteenth century to the contemporary period; It aims to give students a foundational understanding of the cultural inheritance of the island. While organized in broadly chronological terms, it will also examine crucial thematic concerns -- landscape, history, languages, economy, society, politics and government, literature, music, sport. The initiative will allow a select group of participants to be involved in a community-based learning experience integral to the course. The service component is under the co-operative efforts of the instructor of the course, Campus Ministry, and the Center for Social Concerns.


For the community-based component of this course, students will work in local agencies serving troubled youth, refugee youth or the elderly and will integrate these experiences into the course through guided journal assignments. These experiences may also be used as the basis for the final research paper. Interested students should expect to spend significant time in these community placements (2-3 hours per week) and to complete extra reading assignments. Placements will be based on student interest, schedules and organizational needs and will be finalized once the students arrive in Dublin.

ANTH 45030 / ILS 45103 / ESS 45652 / LAST 40650 (CBR/CBL)
Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study

Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 3

Mexican immigrants are the fastest growing ethnic group in South Bend. Their three-fold increase over the past decade in South Bend and myriad other U.S. cities reflects how deeply institutionalized migration has become as a domestic strategy for escape from the pressure of relentless poverty, rural decline, and underemployment in rural Mexico. Despite their massive exodus, however, Mexican migrants remain connected to their homelands, unlike earlier migrants who eventually severed their ties to their home countries. Kinship networks, economic relations, political activities and religious practices simultaneously involve Mexicans in home and diaspora locations. Mexican migrants allegedly send home about $13 billion annually. The Mexican government encourages the mobility of its people and offers novel ways to unify those abroad in a border less nation.

This course combines service and experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. At the beginning of the semester, we tour the Mexican immigrant neighborhood of South Bend, visiting the agencies and organizations that provide services to these newcomers. Students apply to volunteer as tutors, assistants and interpreters at selected sites, including schools, clinics, law offices throughout the semester. The service settings and the relationships students establish through them will be the basis for ethnographic research. The results of this research will be presented at the end of the term in both written form and in-class presentation.

BACK TO INDEX

ART, ART HISTORY, AND DESIGN

DESN 41103 (CBR)
Graphic Design III

Robert Sedlack, Jr.


Logo and Identity Design for local not-for-profit agencies —

Every semester my Graphic Design 3 students are asked to design a new logo and initial identity pieces for not-for-profit organizations. The organization can be in South Bend area or their hometown. Many students have had their work accepted and produced, including logo and additional design materials for the Potawatomi Zoo, Center for the Homeless Paint Services, El Buen Vecino, Notre Dame Pilot Initiative, Campus Ministries, Global Health Alliance, A Different Way, Iron Sharpens Iron, Reins of Life, A.D.A.P.T., and Holy Cross Elementary School.

Art in April at St. John the Baptist —
In a continuing effort to have the class give back to the community and help more people understand what design is, every year my spring semester Graphic Design 3 class visits children at St. John the Baptist elementary school here in South Bend and guide the upper level students through a graphic design project. The Notre Dame students are broken up into groups and each group selects a project they would like to teach to the elementary school children. We visit St. John two times, first to introduce ourselves and the project and a second time to "art direct" the students as they create their pieces.

BACK TO INDEX

COLLEGE SEMINAR

CSEM 23101 (CBL)
Poverty and Politics

William Lies, C.S.C. (Political Science)
William Purcell (Center for Social Concerns)


Why are there so many poor people in the United States and why should we care? How is it possible that, with all its resources, the United States of America in the 21st century has one of the highest poverty rates in the industrialized world? A lack of affordable housing, of living wage jobs, of adequate health care and of quality education has meant that there is approximately 13% of the population living below the poverty line. Political solutions have not adequately addressed this massive social problem. While looking at the various social issues that bear on the persistence of current poverty levels, this course will focus on approaches that have attempted to address this problem. After reviewing the history of poverty in the U.S., the course will consider present political strategies, the role of responsible citizenship as well as Catholic social teaching. The issues to be explored include race, immigration, gender, labor, and globalization. This interdisciplinary course will engage works from the humanities, the arts and the social sciences, including, among others, The Jungle, The Working Poor, readings in Catholic social teaching, as well as participation in the DPAC-Center for Social Concerns “Solidarity Film Series.” Also, integral to the learning process is a community-based learning component, coordinated through the Center for Social Concerns, which will have the students regularly engaging an agency within the local community. Oral presentations and class discussions will be a primary focus of the student work in this course.

CSEM 23101 (CBR)
Labor, Race, and the Struggle for Dignity

Marty Wolfson

This course will examine the lives of workers and people of color in America by examining their struggles for dignity and respect, especially as they come together in our nation’s workplaces. The perspective will be on people’s own stories about the conditions of their daily lives as expressed in nonfiction, novels, films, and oral histories. The course will also examine the methods that have been used in the struggle for dignity, especially through the roles of unions and nonviolent campaigns.


The content of the course will focus on three areas:

  1. The African-American Civil Rights Movement, especially as it linked up with workers’ lives in the campaign of the Memphis sanitation workers in 1968.
  2. The Farmworkers’ campaign led by Cesar Chavez and influenced by the philosophy of the nonviolent direct action of Mahatma Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
  3. The struggles of workers in the meat packing industry as representative of current labor developments, and especially as related to the issues of interracial conflict and unity.


A requirement of the course is to conduct an oral history with a worker and/or person of color in order to understand their life experiences in the context of the issues discussed in the course.

CSEM 23101 (CBL)
Disability

Essaka Joshua

This interdisciplinary course investigates the cultural meanings attached to extraordinary bodies and minds. Cultural and literary scholarship has extensively explored issues connected with identities derived from race, gender and sexuality. Only recently have concepts of bodily identity, impairment, stigma, monstrosity, marginalization, beauty, deviance, and difference begun to cohere around disability as a concept and have emerged into a discipline called ‘disability studies’. We will cover topics such as human rights, feminism, medical attitudes, social stigma, normalcy, life narratives, pedagogy, bodily representation, mental impairment, the politics of charity, community and collective culture, bible narrative, the built environment, and empowerment, in a range of disciplines including literary studies, film, theology, government policy, art, and drama. The course has a service-learning component: as part of the assessment, students will take part in a local placement with people with disabilities and work on a community project.

BACK TO INDEX

GENDER STUDIES

GSC 45001-01 (CBL)
Gender Studies Senior Internship

Fulfills Senior Capstone Project Requirement for Majors
Linnie Caye
Department approval required

In collaboration with the Gender Studies internship advisor, students choose an organization or business in the South Bend area for which they serve as a non-paid intern. In addition to performing 6-8 hours of internship service per week for their chosen internship site, students write either a 12-15 page research paper or create an applied project designed to benefit the sponsoring agency. This course may be taken in either the fall or spring semester of the senior year. This course fulfills the senior capstone project requirement for Gender Studies supplementary majors but can be taken as an elective for either the Gender Studies supplementary major or the Gender Studies minor.

BACK TO INDEX

HESBURGH PROGRAM IN PUBLIC SERVICE

HESB 30451 /PSY 43247 (CBL)
Leadership, Ethics, and Social Responsibility

Jay Brandenberger
Credit hours: 3


This course examines leadership and empowerment issues from various disciplinary perspectives, focusing on the role of the leader within organizations that promote service, social action, or other forms of social responsibility. Alternative models of leadership are explored, with attention to ethical and moral implications. Sample topics include: historical/ cultural paradigms of leadership, organizational theory, leadership and gender, and the like. The course is interdisciplinary and draws students from various majors and campus student organizations. Readings will be drawn from a variety of sources and discussed in a seminar format. A collaborative community research project, building on students' areas of involvement, will be central to the learning experience.
The course is designed for students involved in a leadership position or initiative during the 2009/10 academic year. Relevant domains include service/social action student groups, student government, sport teams, residence life, and the like.
Special permission required: contact Meredith Nelson or Patty Flynn at the Center for Social Concerns (631-5293).

HESB 43537 / BIOS 50544 / STV 43396 / PHIL 43308 / IIPS 50901/ CST 43308 (CBR)
Environmental Justice

Kristin Shrader-Frechette
Credit Hours: 3

Students in this course will study the phenomenon of environmental injustice as it relates to how poor people, minorities, and children are most affected by pollution and usually endure much higher pollution levels. For example, hazardous-waste sites are disproportionately surrounded by black and Latino communities. The course examines some of the scientific ways polluters get away with this injustice and some of the ethical reasons for correcting it. It also shows students how their research and service can help correct it. Main coursework is project based: analyzing ethical or scientific flaws in impact statements, regulations, or policy decisions that disproportionately affect the poor and minorities. Students will work with the communities to analyze their health and environmental materials and obtain a statement of the problem. They will be analyzing draft government impact assessments to show whether they meet the scientific or ethical standards necessary to protect poor people and minorities. Students supply the results of their analyses to the affected communities as well as to legislators. In the past, this research has been used to protect children and poor people in many areas of the U.S. and abroad.

BACK TO INDEX

HISTORY

HIST 34430 / SOC 34123 / ANTH 34320 / IRST 24208 (CBL)
Introduction to Ireland

ND Keough Center Course: Kevin Whelan

This class focuses on the evolution of Irish culture from the eighteenth century to the contemporary period; It aims to give students a foundational understanding of the cultural inheritance of the island. While organized in broadly chronological terms, it will also examine crucial thematic concerns -- landscape, history, languages, economy, society, politics and government, literature, music, sport. The initiative will allow a select group of participants to be involved in a community-based learning experience integral to the course. The service component is under the co-operative efforts of the instructor of the course, Campus Ministry, and the Center for Social Concerns.


For the community-based component of this course, students will work in local agencies serving troubled youth, refugee youth or the elderly and will integrate these experiences into the course through guided journal assignments. These experiences may also be used as the basis for the final research paper. Interested students should expect to spend significant time in these community placements (2-3 hours per week) and to complete extra reading assignments. Placements will be based on student interest, schedules and organizational needs and will be finalized once the students arrive in Dublin.

BACK TO INDEX

LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

LAST 40650 / ILS 45103 / ESS 45652 / ANTH 45030 (CBR/CBL)
Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study

Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 3

Mexican immigrants are the fastest growing ethnic group in South Bend. Their three-fold increase over the past decade in South Bend and myriad other U.S. cities reflects how deeply institutionalized migration has become as a domestic strategy for escape from the pressure of relentless poverty, rural decline, and underemployment in rural Mexico. Despite their massive exodus, however, Mexican migrants remain connected to their homelands, unlike earlier migrants who eventually severed their ties to their home countries. Kinship networks, economic relations, political activities and religious practices simultaneously involve Mexicans in home and diaspora locations. Mexican migrants allegedly send home about $13 billion annually. The Mexican government encourages the mobility of its people and offers novel ways to unify those abroad in a border less nation.

This course combines service and experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. At the beginning of the semester, we tour the Mexican immigrant neighborhood of South Bend, visiting the agencies and organizations that provide services to these newcomers. Students apply to volunteer as tutors, assistants and interpreters at selected sites, including schools, clinics, law offices throughout the semester. The service settings and the relationships students establish through them will be the basis for ethnographic research. The results of this research will be presented at the end of the term in both written form and in-class presentation.

BACK TO INDEX

PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 43308 / BIOS 50544 / STV 43396 / HESB 43537 / IIPS 50901 / CST 43308 (CBR)
Environmental Justice

Kristin Shrader-Frechette
Credit Hours: 3

Students in this course will study the phenomenon of environmental injustice as it relates to how poor people, minorities, and children are most affected by pollution and usually endure much higher pollution levels. For example, hazardous-waste sites are disproportionately surrounded by black and Latino communities. The course examines some of the scientific ways polluters get away with this injustice and some of the ethical reasons for correcting it. It also shows students how their research and service can help correct it. Main coursework is project based: analyzing ethical or scientific flaws in impact statements, regulations, or policy decisions that disproportionately affect the poor and minorities. Students will work with the communities to analyze their health and environmental materials and obtain a statement of the problem. They will be analyzing draft government impact assessments to show whether they meet the scientific or ethical standards necessary to protect poor people and minorities. Students supply the results of their analyses to the affected communities as well as to legislators. In the past, this research has been used to protect children and poor people in many areas of the U.S. and abroad.

BACK TO INDEX

POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 35901 (CBL/CBR)
Internships

Carolina Arroyo
Permission required

The goal of the internship program is to integrate academic learning with the world beyond the classroom. Internships are available throughout the Notre Dame area with a variety of government offices, non-profit agencies and NGOs. Interns work with professionals in their area of interest, explore career options and gain real work experience. Interns are required to work 6-8 hours per week. All internships are unpaid. Internship credits are elective and do not fulfill any major requirements.

BACK TO INDEX

PSYCHOLOGY

PSY 25270 / ESS 35623 (CBL)
Practicum in Developmental Disabilities

Thomas Whitman
Permission required

This practicum/seminar is the logical outgrowth of a long informal relationship that student volunteers have had with families in the Michiana community who have autistic and other special needs children. The practicum aspect of the course will involve students going into a family home and working in a structured program with an autistic child—on average about two times a week for about a total of four to five hours. Requirements: The prerequisite for this course is the Seminar in Autism (PSY 23271 or PSY 43271).

PSY 43247 / HESB 30451 (CBL)
Leadership, Ethics, and Social Responsibility

Jay Brandenberger

This course examines leadership and empowerment issues from various disciplinary perspectives, focusing on the role of the leader within organizations that promote service, social action, or other forms of social responsibility. Alternative models of leadership are explored, with attention to ethical and moral implications. Sample topics include: historical/ cultural paradigms of leadership, organizational theory, leadership and gender, and the like. The course is interdisciplinary and draws students from various majors and campus student organizations. Readings will be drawn from a variety of sources and discussed in a seminar format. A collaborative community research project, building on students' areas of involvement, will be central to the learning experience.
The course is designed for students involved in a leadership position or initiative during the 2009/10 academic year. Relevant domains include service/social action student groups, student government, sport teams, residence life, and the like.
Special permission required: contact Meredith Nelson or Patty Flynn at the Center for Social Concerns (631-5293).

PSY 23271 or 43271 / ESS 40263 (CBL)
Seminar in Autism

Thomas Whitman
Permission required

This practicum/seminar is the logical outgrowth of a long informal relationship that student volunteers have had with families in the Michiana community who have autistic and other special needs children. The practicum aspect of the course will involve students going into a family home and working in a structured program with an autistic child - on average about two times a week for about a total of four to five hours. In addition, students will meet in class once a week for discussion of a range of topics relating to autism, including issues regarding its definition, assessment, etiology, and treatment, as well as topics regarding the impact of autism on the family, community resources, and social policy. A number of classes will feature discussions led by parents of autistic children. This class is particularly recommended for students interested in child clinical psychology, education, developmental psychology, medicine, social work, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. Non-majors are welcome with permission.
Requirements: Regular attendance (practicum setting and class), completion of practicum diary, active class participation, a paper on some topic related to autism. Students must have access to a car in order to attend their practicum.

PSY 44370 / ESS 34350 / SOC 24720 (CBL)
Developmental Disabilities: Integrating Theory and Practice (London Program)

Permission required - 3 credits

In this course, students learn how knowledge and understanding of developmental psychology inform professional practice in schools for pupils with severe and profound learning disabilities. The course examines how children with severe developmental disabilities come to understand their world and how teachers and other school-based professionals devise programs to meet children's very individual needs.

The course is based at Riverside School (formerly called Rectory Paddock School), a State school for young pupils with severe learning disabilities. Each week, students spend time with pupils and professionals in classrooms.

This practical focus is followed by a class that treats such topics as Severe and Profound Learning Disabilities; the Autistic Spectrum; Language and Communication, Children with Complex Health Needs; Challenging Behavior; Multidisciplinary Therapeutic Practice; and Integration. Students have opportunities to meet with parents and families of young people with disabilities.

BACK TO INDEX

ROMANCE LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

ROSP 40875 / ILS 40907 (CBL)
Migrant Voices

Marisel Moreno Anderson

This course examines the literary production of U.S. Latinos/as. We will read works by Mexican-American, Puerto Rican, Cuban-American and Dominican-American authors paying close attention to the intersection of race, class, and gender issues. The literature studied will serve as a window into the culture of the local Latino community as students engage in service-learning at Casa de Amistad throughout the semester.

BACK TO INDEX

SOCIOLOGY

SOC 24720 / ESS 34350 / PSY 44370 (CBL)
Developmental Disabilities: Integrating Theory and Practice (London Program)

Permission required - 3 credits

In this course, students learn how knowledge and understanding of developmental psychology inform professional practice in schools for pupils with severe and profound learning disabilities. The course examines how children with severe developmental disabilities come to understand their world and how teachers and other school-based professionals devise programs to meet children's very individual needs.

The course is based at Riverside School (formerly called Rectory Paddock School), a State school for young pupils with severe learning disabilities. Each week, students spend time with pupils and professionals in classrooms.

This practical focus is followed by a class that treats such topics as Severe and Profound Learning Disabilities; the Autistic Spectrum; Language and Communication, Children with Complex Health Needs; Challenging Behavior; Multidisciplinary Therapeutic Practice; and Integration. Students have opportunities to meet with parents and families of young people with disabilities.

SOC 34123 / HIST 34430 / ANTH 34320 / IRST 24208 (CBL)
Introduction to Ireland

ND Keough Center Course: Kevin Whelan

This class focuses on the evolution of Irish culture from the eighteenth century to the contemporary period; It aims to give students a foundational understanding of the cultural inheritance of the island. While organized in broadly chronological terms, it will also examine crucial thematic concerns -- landscape, history, languages, economy, society, politics and government, literature, music, sport. The initiative will allow a select group of participants to be involved in a community-based learning experience integral to the course. The service component is under the co-operative efforts of the instructor of the course, Campus Ministry, and the Center for Social Concerns.
For the community-based component of this course, students will work in local agencies serving troubled youth, refugee youth or the elderly and will integrate these experiences into the course through guided journal assignments. These experiences may also be used as the basis for the final research paper. Interested students should expect to spend significant time in these community placements (2-3 hours per week) and to complete extra reading assignments. Placements will be based on student interest, schedules and organizational needs and will be finalized once the students arrive in Dublin.

SOC 43691 (CBL)
Religion and Social Activism

Kraig Beyerlein

This course mainly focuses on how religion acts as a double-edged sword for social change, promoting both radicalization and quiescence. Students will be exposed to the major topics, theories, and debates in the scholarly work on religion and social change as well as important empirical cases of collective action in which religion has been a force, such as the U.S. civil rights movement, U.S. Central peace movement, East German Revolution, and anti-abortion activism. In studying religion’s impact on social change, we will pay particular attention to how different dimensions of religion shape social activism, the mechanisms through which religion mobilizes or demobilizes social activism, and whether—and if so, how—religious-based activism is distinct from its secular counterpart. Though most of the course examines the effect of religion on social activism, we will also reverse the causal arrow and consider how social activism affects religion and the processes involved in this influence. (Please note: During the semester, students will have the opportunity to engage in service-related projects, both locally and at least one non-local location, though doing so is not required.) Restrictions: Seniors and juniors only.

SOC 45000 (CBL)
Sociology Internships

Ann R. Power
Permission required
Credits: Variable, 1-3

This is an experiential course designed to give students some practical experience in the area of urban affairs, social welfare, education, health care, or business, in order to test their interest, complement their academic work, or acquire work experience preparatory to future careers. Students are placed in a community agency in the South Bend area and normally work eight hours per week as interns under the supervision of an experienced practitioner. Hours are flexible, usually set to accommodate the intern's availability and the needs of the host agency. While there are no prerequisites, preference is given to Sociology majors, ALPP or SCPP majors, PSIM minors, and students who have had course work in an area related to social concerns. This is a graded course. In addition to field work, academic work includes reading scholarly works related to the field placement, periodic group meetings with the instructor and others in the course, and a final paper. For more information and/or an application, contact Ann Power.


The following is a list of agencies that have accepted interns. Students may also request placement in an agency they find on their own (subject to approval by the instructor).

CASIE Center (Child Abuse Services, Investigation & Education)

Center for Hospice & Palliative Care, St. Joseph County

Early Childhood Development Center

Family Justice Center
Good Shepherd Montessori School

Indiana Legal Services
La Casa de Amistad
Near Northwest Neighborhood Inc.
Neighborhood Development Association

Robinson Community Learning Center
Safe Station (Youth Runaway Shelter)
Salvation Army of St. Joseph County (Social Services)
Sex Offense Services of St. Joseph County
Sr. Maura Brannick Health Center at Chapin Street
Upward Bound College Preparatory Program, UND
Washington High School, South Bend

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THEOLOGY

THEO 13183 (CBL)
Theology University Seminar

Timothy Matovina

This seminar offers a critical study of the Bible, the person of Jesus, depictions of Jesus in film, and the significance of Christianity’s theological foundations for Christian life and theology. The course has a particular focus on the themes of vocation and calling in the scriptures, the Christian tradition, and Christian life. An optional service-learning project provides students an opportunity to explore the meaning of vocation in contemporary Christian life.

THEO 20625 (CBL)
Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice

Margie Pfeil

This course is designed for students who have completed a Summer Service Project Internship (SSLP or ISSLP) through the Center for Social Concerns. The main objective is to afford students the opportunity to combine social analysis with theological reflection. The course material will span a variety of ethical issues, including education, globalization, restorative justice, racial justice, power relations, environmental justice, and structural violence. These topics will be held in conversation with the Catholic social tradition. A major component of the course will entail the presentation and analysis of student-generated research emerging from the SSLP/ISSLP.
Prerequisite: Completion of the SSLP/ISSLP through the Center for Social Concerns
Class Limit: 25 Students

THEO 20643 (CBL)
The Askesis of Nonviolence: Theology and Practice

Margie Pfeil

This course will explore the theology and practice of nonviolence as a form of askesis, or spiritual discipline. The material will include readings from Scripture, the early and medieval Christian tradition, Catholic social teaching, readings from the traditional "Peace Churches," Tolstoy, Dorothy Day, and Martin Luther King. Religious sources outside the Christian tradition will include Gandhi, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Badshah Khan. This course will use the method of community-based learning and will require 20 hours of service at particular sites in the South Bend area.
Class Limit: 25 students

THEO 33931 / CSC 33931 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Internship: Microfinance and Social Venturing Internships

Andrea Smith Shappell/Carl Ackermann
1 Credit THEO, 1 or 2 Credits BA
Application and interview required — 8-10 week internship program
Taken with BAUG 30200

Students who are completing their junior year in the Mendoza College of Business are eligible for this course which centers on summer internships. In the Microfinance internships, student work with ACCION and other microfinance organizations, applying their business and technical skills to the needs of the organization and learning from the opportunity to work in a dynamic micro-lending organization. Other student work in social enterprise organizations that promote double- or triple-bottom-line strategies (for-profit or not-for-profit organizations that attend to a financial, social and/or environmental bottom line). Students use their business skills to promote economic development initiatives, assist with feasibility or business planning for a new social enterprise, or guide future growth of an ongoing initiative through capacity building and other strategic activities. Course requirements include orientation sessions in April, readings and writing assignments during the summer, and a power point presentation in the fall semester.

THEO 33933 / CSC 33933 / ILS 35801 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Internship: Latino Leadership Intern Program

Don McNeill

Meets during four times during spring semester 2010 and twice in fall 2010.
Immersion: Eight weeks during summer 2010


This is a leadership internship for fluent Spanish speakers with a commitment to learning and serving in Latino communities. After a series of course meetings in the spring semester, students work 8 weeks during the summer in Chicago with organizations dedicated to empowering local Latino communities. Students will learn and practice leadership skills while deepening their understanding of the issues facing Latino communities. Assignments include readings and reflection on course topics, written assignments during the summer and discussions during the first weeks of the fall semester. Offered in collaboration with the Institute for Latino Studies. Students who have completed the 8 week internship in the summer of 2009 or 2010 should register for this course in the fall of 2010.
Acceptance to this course is based on application and interview of candidates.


THEO 33936 / CSC 33936 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues

Andrea Smith Shappell / Margaret Pfeil

Immersion: Eight week summer service-learning placements


This three-credit hour service-learning course takes place before, during, and after student participation in eight-week summer service experiences sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Alumni Association. Students in the course reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through readings and writing, along with discussions with site supervisors, and facilitated group discussions upon return to campus. Writing assignments include 16 journal entries and a synthesis paper. The course is completed during the first four weeks of the fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory.

THEO 33938 / CSC 33938 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Program: International

Rachel Tomas Morgan
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: THEO 33970

Application required — Eight week summer immersion


This course and internship is synonymous with the Center for Social Concerns International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP). The course seeks to challenge students who have domestic service-learning experiences to encounter international realities, and to provide them the opportunity to work with persons and grass roots groups working to address the needs of the poor internationally. The learning goals of the course are to gain and understanding of the multidimensionality of poverty in the developing world; analyze root causes, and identify strategies for social development (poverty alleviation); to gain an understanding of international social issues in light of Catholic social teaching; and to strengthen cross-cultural competencies. Academic requirements include a journal, reading and writing assignments during the summer months, a re-entry weekend retreat, four re-entry classes meeting on Thursdays 6:30-7:45 p.m. in September and October, and a final paper/project.

THEO 33950 / CSC 33950 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

Connie Mick
One week immersion required

This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes (e.g., rural health care, environmental issues) at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.

THEO 33951 / CSC 33951 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Washington, D.C.

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This course centers on a trip to Washington, D.C. over spring break during which time students analyze a significant social issue through contact with various agencies, government offices, and church organizations. Students participate in preparation and follow-up sessions. Themes (e.g., Educational Reform, Violence in America) vary each year.

THEO 33959 / CSC 33959 (CBL)
Latino Community Organizing Against Violence Seminar

Cynthia Toms Smedley


The Latino Community Organizing Against Violence Seminar explores the rich cultural heritage of Chicago's ethnic neighborhoods and immigrant traditions while examining the corresponding problems of urban life and racism. The Seminar’s focus is a week-long immersion (during fall break) in Chicago that involves dialogue with various community groups, participation in ethnic activities, and academic reflection.

THEO 33961 / CSC 33961 (EL)
Discernment Seminar

Mike Hebbeler

This seminar focuses on senior students discerning and envisioning the integration of faith/theology and social concerns into their lives beyond Notre Dame.


Course Objectives:

  • To provide senior level students the space to reflect on their undergraduate experience and postgraduate plans with one another through small-group discussion
  • To provide students the opportunity to explore their respective vocations through narrative theology, spiritual direction, literature, music and art

THEO 33962 / CSC 33962 (CBL)
Gospel of Life Seminar

Cynthia Toms Smedley

The goal of the Gospel of Life Seminar is to provide students with the opportunity to read and reflect and on a variety of life issues through experiential learning. Exploration begins in the orientation classes where students will become familiar with the issues through reading Roman Catholic Church documents such as The Gospel of Life and by meeting people who work on life-related issues. During the week in Washington, D.C., seminar participants will meet with representatives from the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, elected officials, advocacy groups, legal professionals, and bio ethicists whose work involves life-related concerns. The follow-up classes facilitate analysis and synthesis of insights gained during the week of experiential learning.

THEO 334605 / CSC 34604 (CBL/EL)
London Program Internship in Catholic Social Teaching

Cornelius O’Boyle

This semester-long internship brings together practical work experience in campaigning for social justice in some of London poorest inner-city Catholic parishes with a series of tutorials providing an introduction to the social teaching of the Catholic Church.The practical work experience of this internship is arranged through London Citizens, a charitable organization devoted to building community in London’s poorest neighborhoods. London Citizens helps members of the community to identify problems in their neighborhoods, offers them appropriate training to help develop their leadership skills, and organizes city-wide campaigns to unite Londoners in pursuing the common good.

For their tutorials, weekly journals and final research paper, interns are awarded three academic credits through the Theology Department (THEO 34605). These elective credits do not fulfill the Theology requirements, nor do they count towards a major in Theology. Students devote between 10 and 15 hours each week to this unpaid internship. Applications are invited from students of all academic backgrounds.

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SUPPLEMENTARY MAJORS, MINORS, AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS

CATHOLIC SOCIAL TRADITION

CST 20625 / THEO 20625 (CBL)
Discipleship: Loving Action for Justice

Margie Pfeil


This course is designed for students who have completed a Summer Service Project Internship (SSLP or ISSLP) through the Center for Social Concerns. The main objective is to afford students the opportunity to combine social analysis with theological reflection. The course material will span a variety of ethical issues, including education, globalization, restorative justice, racial justice, power relations, environmental justice, and structural violence. These topics will be held in conversation with the Catholic social tradition. A major component of the course will entail the presentation and analysis of student-generated research emerging from the SSLP/ISSLP.
Prerequisite: Completion of the SSLP/ISSLP through the Center for Social Concerns
Class Limit: 25 Students


CST 20643 / THEO 20643 / IIPS 20729 (CBL)
The Askesis of Nonviolence: Theology and Practice

Margie Pfeil


This course will explore the theology and practice of nonviolence as a form of askesis, or spiritual discipline. The material will include readings from Scripture, the early and medieval Christian tradition, Catholic social teaching, readings from the traditional "Peace Churches," Tolstoy, Dorothy Day, and Martin Luther King. Religious sources outside the Christian tradition will include Gandhi, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Badshah Khan. This course will use the method of community-based learning and will require 20 hours of service at particular sites in the South Bend area.
Class Limit: 25 students


CST 30505 / BAMG 30505 (CBL)
Micro-venturing I for Business Students

Melissa Paulsen


The course will explore the innovative concepts, practices and strategies associated with micro enterprise and micro financing initiatives, engaging in the assessment and analysis of social models through the case study method.


CST 43308 / BIOS 50544 / STV 43396 / PHIL 43308 / IIPS 50901 / HESB 43537 (CBR)
Environmental Justice

Kristin Shrader-Frechette
Credit Hours: 3


Students in this course will study the phenomenon of environmental injustice as it relates to how poor people, minorities, and children are most affected by pollution and usually endure much higher pollution levels. For example, hazardous-waste sites are disproportionately surrounded by black and Latino communities. The course examines some of the scientific ways polluters get away with this injustice and some of the ethical reasons for correcting it. It also shows students how their research and service can help correct it. Main coursework is project based: analyzing ethical or scientific flaws in impact statements, regulations, or policy decisions that disproportionately affect the poor and minorities. Students will work with the communities to analyze their health and environmental materials and obtain a statement of the problem. They will be analyzing draft government impact assessments to show whether they meet the scientific or ethical standards necessary to protect poor people and minorities. Students supply the results of their analyses to the affected communities as well as to legislators. In the past, this research has been used to protect children and poor people in many areas of the U.S. and abroad.

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EDUCATION, SCHOOLING, AND SOCIETY

ESS 30611 (CBL)
Tutoring in the Community

Nancy Masters

This class is offered for students who are taking part in any of the campus-wide tutoring programs, such as Teamwork for Tomorrow or SAINTS. The class provides an overview of teaching methods for the tutoring setting. Arrangements for tutoring can be made prior to the start of class by contacting Nancy Masters.

ESS 30623 / CSC 30623 (CBR)
Community-Based Research in Education

Stuart Greene

Community-based research (CBR) is a form of applied scholarship that collaboratively engages campus and community organizations in the research process. By definition, a CBR problem originates in the community, and campus/community partners actively work together during the design and analysis phases. As a result, the research outcome is more likely to be useful for the community partner. In this course, students will have an opportunity to influence educational policy by helping the South Bend Community School Corporation: 1) review existing research on specific contemporary educational issues; 2) do evaluative research of existing programs. Previous research experience is helpful, but not necessary; interest in educational issues is required.

ESS 34350 / PSY 44370 / SOC 24720 (CBL)
Developmental Disabilities: Integrating Theory and Practice (London Program)

Permission required - 3 credits

In this course, students learn how knowledge and understanding of developmental psychology inform professional practice in schools for pupils with severe and profound learning disabilities. The course examines how children with severe developmental disabilities come to understand their world and how teachers and other school-based professionals devise programs to meet children's very individual needs.

The course is based at Riverside School (formerly called Rectory Paddock School), a State school for young pupils with severe learning disabilities. Each week, students spend time with pupils and professionals in classrooms.

This practical focus is followed by a class that treats such topics as Severe and Profound Learning Disabilities; the Autistic Spectrum; Language and Communication, Children with Complex Health Needs; Challenging Behavior; Multidisciplinary Therapeutic Practice; and Integration. Students have opportunities to meet with parents and families of young people with disabilities.

ESS 35623 / PSY 25270 (CBL)
Practicum in Developmental Disabilities

Thomas Whitman
Permission required


This practicum/seminar is the logical outgrowth of a long informal relationship that student volunteers have had with families in the Michiana community who have autistic and other special needs children. The practicum aspect of the course will involve students going into a family home and working in a structured program with an autistic child—on average about two times a week for about a total of four to five hours. Requirements: The prerequisite for this course is the Seminar in Autism (PSY 23271 or PSY 43271).


ESS 40263 / PSY 23271 or 43271 (CBL)
Seminar in Autism

Thomas Whitman
Permission required
This practicum/seminar is the logical outgrowth of a long informal relationship that student volunteers have had with families in the Michiana community who have autistic and other special needs children. The practicum aspect of the course will involve students going into a family home and working in a structured program with an autistic child - on average about two times a week for about a total of four to five hours. In addition, students will meet in class once a week for discussion of a range of topics relating to autism, including issues regarding its definition, assessment, etiology, and treatment, as well as topics regarding the impact of autism on the family, community resources, and social policy. A number of classes will feature discussions led by parents of autistic children. This class is particularly recommended for students interested in child clinical psychology, education, developmental psychology, medicine, social work, physical therapy, and occupational therapy. Non-majors are welcome with permission.
Requirements: Regular attendance (practicum setting and class), completion of practicum diary, active class participation, a paper on some topic related to autism. Students must have access to a car in order to attend their practicum.

ESS 45652 / ILS 45103 / ANTH 45030 / LAST 40650 (CBR/CBL)
Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study

Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 3

Mexican immigrants are the fastest growing ethnic group in South Bend. Their three-fold increase over the past decade in South Bend and myriad other U.S. cities reflects how deeply institutionalized migration has become as a domestic strategy for escape from the pressure of relentless poverty, rural decline, and underemployment in rural Mexico. Despite their massive exodus, however, Mexican migrants remain connected to their homelands, unlike earlier migrants who eventually severed their ties to their home countries. Kinship networks, economic relations, political activities and religious practices simultaneously involve Mexicans in home and diaspora locations. Mexican migrants allegedly send home about $13 billion annually. The Mexican government encourages the mobility of its people and offers novel ways to unify those abroad in a border less nation.

This course combines service and experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. At the beginning of the semester, we tour the Mexican immigrant neighborhood of South Bend, visiting the agencies and organizations that provide services to these newcomers. Students apply to volunteer as tutors, assistants and interpreters at selected sites, including schools, clinics, law offices throughout the semester. The service settings and the relationships students establish through them will be the basis for ethnographic research. The results of this research will be presented at the end of the term in both written form and in-class presentation.

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INSTITUTE FOR LATINO STUDIES

ILS 35801 / CSC 33933 / THEO 33933 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Internship: Latino Leadership Intern Program

Don McNeill

Meets during four times during spring semester 2010 and twice in fall 2010.
Immersion: Eight weeks during summer 2010


This is a leadership internship for fluent Spanish speakers with a commitment to learning and serving in Latino communities. After a series of course meetings in the spring semester, students work 8 weeks during the summer in Chicago with organizations dedicated to empowering local Latino communities. Students will learn and practice leadership skills while deepening their understanding of the issues facing Latino communities. Assignments include readings and reflection on course topics, written assignments during the summer and discussions during the first weeks of the fall semester. Offered in collaboration with the Institute for Latino Studies. Students who have completed the 8 week internship in the summer of 2009 or 2010 should register for this course in the fall of 2010.
Acceptance to this course is based on application and interview of candidates.

ILS 40907 / ROSP 40875 (CBL)
Migrant Voices

Marisel Moreno Anderson
This course examines the literary production of U.S. Latinos/as. We will read works by Mexican-American, Puerto Rican, Cuban-American and Dominican-American authors paying close attention to the intersection of race, class, and gender issues. The literature studied will serve as a window into the culture of the local Latino community as students engage in service-learning at Casa de Amistad throughout the semester.

ILS 45103 / ANTH 45030 (CBR/CBL)
Mexican Immigration: A South Bend Case Study

Karen Richman
Credit Hours: 3

Mexican immigrants are the fastest growing ethnic group in South Bend. Their three-fold increase over the past decade in South Bend and myriad other U.S. cities reflects how deeply institutionalized migration has become as a domestic strategy for escape from the pressure of relentless poverty, rural decline, and underemployment in rural Mexico. Despite their massive exodus, however, Mexican migrants remain connected to their homelands, unlike earlier migrants who eventually severed their ties to their home countries. Kinship networks, economic relations, political activities and religious practices simultaneously involve Mexicans in home and diaspora locations. Mexican migrants allegedly send home about $13 billion annually. The Mexican government encourages the mobility of its people and offers novel ways to unify those abroad in a borderless nation.

This course combines service and experiential learning in the Mexican community of South Bend in order to understand how Mexican migrants conduct their lives across the vast distances separating South Bend and their homeland. At the beginning of the semester, we tour the Mexican immigrant neighborhood of South Bend, visiting the agencies and organizations that provide services to these newcomers. Students apply to volunteer as tutors, assistants and interpreters at selected sites, including schools, clinics, law offices throughout the semester. The service settings and the relationships students establish through them will be the basis for ethnographic research. The results of this research will be presented at the end of the term in both written form and in-class presentation.

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MENDOZA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


BAET 40300 (CBL)
Business Ethics Field Project

Jessica McManus Warnell
Credit Hours: 1

This course is designed to provide practical experience in a community-based, social-service setting. Students work with and learn from staff and clients of local organizations over the five-week period. Course requirements include class attendance, a comprehensive journal of the volunteer experience, an assignment and discussions relating the experience to ethical theory, a three-page final paper, and completion of the service project. Students may select from a predetermined list of project-based placements, or may choose to complete 12 hours at the site of their choice from a list provided by the instructor. Discussions address incorporating community stewardship into a business or other professional career. The course is an exciting way to apply community-based learning to the business-education experience.

BAMG 30505/ CST 30505 (CBL)
Microventuring I for Business Students

Melissa Paulsen

The course will explore the innovative concepts, practices and strategies associated with micro enterprise and micro financing initiatives, engaging in the assessment and analysis of social models through the case study method.

BAUG 30505 / IIPS 30924 (CBL)
Microventuring I for Non-Business Student
s
Melissa Paulsen

This course explores the complex issues associated with microventuring, particularly as a vehicle for economic development, including the fundamentals of finance, marketing, and management through the development of a business plan.

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MANAGEMENT

MGT 30630 (CBR)
Systems Analysis and Design of Information Systems

Daewon Sun

An in-depth study of the analysis and design of information processing systems. One of the projects is Analysis and Design of Information Systems in Community Service Organizations where the students will determine the problems and opportunities of the current system used in the social organizations, provide a business model of the system, recommend a revised model, and create a prototype of the revised model, usually a database management system on Microsoft Access. All work completed will be documented and submitted to the social organization for future reference and implementation.


Participants in the past included the following:

Center for the Homeless
DISMAS House of Michiana
Habitat for Humanity
La Casa de Amistad

Women’s Care Center
YWCA

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MARKETING

MARK 30120 (CBR)
Marketing Research

John Gaski

Required for all marketing majors. A study of the application of scientific method to the definition and solution of marketing problems with attention to research design, sampling theory, methods of data collection and the use of statistical techniques in the data analysis. In several cases, application will be with not-for-profit organizations.

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NOTRE DAME MBA

MBGR-76057-01 (CBL)
Leadership in Education: Teaching Financial Literacy

Joe Urbany
Permission Required

This course is designed to engage Notre Dame students in contributing to improvement of math achievement in primary schools. Students will obtain a deep understanding of the current challenges in math achievement in the U.S., learn the basics of teaching primary school children, and develop skill in delivering instruction with an innovative, inquiry-based approach called ND Money Math. ND Money Math is designed to engage primary school children in learning the basics of financial literacy and entrepreneurship with an experiential approach, as opposed to traditional math instruction by routine problem-solving. Early meetings of the class will focus on understanding the conceptual logic behind the “Money Math” program, followed by a teaching component.

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COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

EG / CSE 20600 (CBL/CBR)
Engineering Projects in Community Service

Toys Group | Contact Paul Brenner
This project involves the configuring of toys and other electrical powered items for use by the therapists at the Logan Center and St. Joseph Medical Center. With the modified items, the therapists will be able to work more effectively with the mentally and physically challenged youth.

Logan Industries | Contact Paul Brenner
Design projects for Logan Industries packaging and assembly facility. Additional software support projects anticipated.

Autism Center of Michiana | Contact Greg Madey
Development of an interactive web site that serves as a critical component of the Center, which was created through a cooperative effort between a variety of community institutions (local school systems, hospitals, and the Logan Center) and the University of Notre Dame. The web site serves as an informational tool, both locally and nationally, and a search vehicle to identify the population of individuals with autism in this region (estimated to number about 2000).

St. Joseph Chapter of the American Red Cross | Contact Greg Madey
Computer science and engineering students working with the St. Joseph County Chapter of the American Red Cross to design and deploy an online data management system that will enable the local chapter to be more effective and efficient in serving the community when responding to disasters and emergencies. The databases they are developing identify and track resources (food, blankets, temporary shelter, clothing, medications, etc.) along with geographical data to simplify the complex task of matching needs to resources for quicker response times for people in need.

Madison Center Web Applications | Contact Greg Madey
Computer Science and engineering students are assisting the Madison Center with the development of multiple online content management and web applications: web pages, databases, short course registration, employment applications, etc.

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LAW SCHOOL

LAW SCHOOL

LAW 75721 (CBL)
Legal Aid I and Ethics

Robert Jones / Judith Fox / Michael Jenuwine

Legal Aid I and Ethics (Law 75721): Legal Aid I and Ethics is a 5-credit, graded course providing training in basic lawyer skills, including interviewing and counseling, as well as ethics, substantive law and procedural law relevant to the representation of low income clients in the courts and administrative agencies. Students represent clients under the close supervision of a clinical faculty member. Students typically represent 2-5 clients during the course of a semester. The case types vary somewhat among the sections, as described below. The classroom component of the course uses a combined lecture and mock exercise format. Students are typically required to participate in at least one community education presentation. This course satisfies the upper level ethics requirement.

Legal Aid I and Ethics: Landlord-Tenant/Social Security Disability (Law 75721, Sec. 01, Jones). Students in this section may handle landlord-tenant cases, Social Security disability cases, or other poverty law matters. Many cases handled in this section can be completed in the course of a semester, allowing students an opportunity to see a matter through from beginning to end.

Legal Aid I and Ethics: Consumer Law (75721, Sec. 02, Fox): This section focuses on consumer protection issues. The particular substantive law issues vary by semester, depending on client needs. Cases involve the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, common law fraud, and Indiana’s small loan statute, among other issues. Students often engage in discovery activities and can expect to draft and answer interrogatories, conduct and defend depositions, and participate in settlement efforts. Court appearances tend to be motion hearings, with an occasional trial.

Legal Aid I and Ethics: Mental Health Law (Law 75721, Sec. 03, Jenuwine): This section trains students to advocate on behalf of individuals with mental illnesses and disabilities. Students will participate in cases involving clients who are mental health consumers and clients with disabilities. Case types may include civil court proceedings such as guardianships, criminal hearings involving mentally ill or mentally retarded defendants, and administrative proceedings involving denial of benefits such as Social Security disability, Medicaid, or Vocational Rehabilitation.

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COLLEGE OF SCIENCE

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

BIOS 50544 / HESB 43537 / STV 43396 / PHIL 43308 / IIPS 50901 / CST 43308 (CBR)
Environmental Justice

Kristin Shrader-Frechette
Credit Hours: 3

Students in this course will study the phenomenon of environmental injustice as it relates to how poor people, minorities, and children are most affected by pollution and usually endure much higher pollution levels. For example, hazardous-waste sites are disproportionately surrounded by black and Latino communities. The course examines some of the scientific ways polluters get away with this injustice and some of the ethical reasons for correcting it. It also shows students how their research and service can help correct it. Main coursework is project based: analyzing ethical or scientific flaws in impact statements, regulations, or policy decisions that disproportionately affect the poor and minorities. Students will work with the communities to analyze their health and environmental materials and obtain a statement of the problem. They will be analyzing draft government impact assessments to show whether they meet the scientific or ethical standards necessary to protect poor people and minorities. Students supply the results of their analyses to the affected communities as well as to legislators. In the past, this research has been used to protect children and poor people in many areas of the U.S. and abroad.

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CHEMISTRY

CHEM 30331 (CBR)
Chemistry in Service of the Community

Dennis Jacobs
Credit Hours: 1

Lead poisoning presents a serious risk to the neurological development of young children. Chemistry, biochemistry, and chemical engineering majors have the opportunity to join community partners in assessing lead contamination in area homes. Students will interact with residents in local neighborhoods, provide information on the health risks associated with lead poisoning, collect paint chips, soil, and dust samples, and analyze them for lead levels. This community-based learning experience is open only to students who are simultaneously enrolled in Analytical Chemistry (CHEM 30333 and 31333) or have taken CHEM 31333 previously. CHEM 30331 count towards graduation as one science-elective credit.

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SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, AND VALUES

STV 33401 / CSC 33401 (CBR)
Animal Welfare and the Human-Animal Bond Community Based Learning Seminar

Kay Stewart and Michelle Whaley

Over 11,000 animals are surrendered to local St. Joe County shelters each year and over 50% are euthanized due to a lack of homes who want them. The focus of this course will be on pet overpopulation, specifically working with animal shelters and veterinarians in our community. This course will also cover animal behavior from an evolutionary perspective, animal welfare issues, and will intimately and meaningfully connect the state of humans, to that of animals. The students will carry out community research projects and will immerse themselves in an important community issue and generate data that can help the plight of animals (and therefore humans) in our community.

STV 43396 / BIOS 50544 / HESB 43537 / PHIL 43308 / IIPS 50901 / CST 43308 (CBR)
Environmental Justice

Kristin Shrader-Frechette
Credit Hours: 3

Students in this course will study the phenomenon of environmental injustice as it relates to how poor people, minorities, and children are most affected by pollution and usually endure much higher pollution levels. For example, hazardous-waste sites are disproportionately surrounded by black and Latino communities. The course examines some of the scientific ways polluters get away with this injustice and some of the ethical reasons for correcting it. It also shows students how their research and service can help correct it. Main coursework is project based: analyzing ethical or scientific flaws in impact statements, regulations, or policy decisions that disproportionately affect the poor and minorities. Students will work with the communities to analyze their health and environmental materials and obtain a statement of the problem. They will be analyzing draft government impact assessments to show whether they meet the scientific or ethical standards necessary to protect poor people and minorities. Students supply the results of their analyses to the affected communities as well as to legislators. In the past, this research has been used to protect children and poor people in many areas of the U.S. and abroad.

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SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

ARCH 51411-01 / ARCH 53411-01 (CBR)
Restoration and Historic Preservation Concentration

Krupali Uplekar, John Stamper, and Alan Defrees

Beginning in fall 2007, architecture students entering their fourth year may participate in the Preservation and Restoration Concentration. The concentration initially includes the following courses: Research and Documentation of Historical Buildings (Krupali Uplekar), History of American Architecture 1630-1915 (John Stamper), Historic Preservation and Traditional Construction (Alan Defrees), and History and Theory of Preservation (Steven Semes). This is a relatively new field and advance methods are being generated everyday that could help in betterment of preservation of old structures. Restoration and Historic Preservation is needed to help architectural students understand the need of preserving traditional architecture and, in some cases, studying the art of restoration of traditional buildings that have degenerated due to various reasons. The concentration provides a detailed reference to the recording methods and techniques that are fundamental tools for examining any existing structure.

ARCH 81151 (EL)
Urban Design II

Philip Bess

Part two of a two-studio sequence for students concentrating in urban design, entailing an on-site real-world charrette to create a neighborhood or town plan and the graphic documents and legal mechanisms needed to implement it. Location changes every year.

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CENTERS AND INSTITUTES

CENTER FOR SOCIAL CONCERNS

CSC 30623 / ESS 30623 (CBR)
Community-Based Research in Education

Stuart Greene

Community-based research (CBR) is a form of applied scholarship that collaboratively engages campus and community organizations in the research process. By definition, a CBR problem originates in the community, and campus/community partners actively work together during the design and analysis phases. As a result, the research outcome is more likely to be useful for the community partner. In this course, students will have an opportunity to influence educational policy by helping the South Bend Community School Corporation: 1) review existing research on specific contemporary educational issues; 2) do evaluative research of existing programs. Previous research experience is helpful, but not necessary; interest in educational issues is required.

CSC 33931 / THEO 33931 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Internship: Microfinance and Social Venturing Internships

Andrea Smith Shappell/Carl Ackermann
1 Credit THEO, 1 or 2 Credits BA
Application and interview required — 8-10 week internship program
Taken with BAUG 30200

Students who are completing their junior year in the Mendoza College of Business are eligible for this course which centers on summer internships. In the Microfinance internships, student work with ACCION and other microfinance organizations, applying their business and technical skills to the needs of the organization and learning from the opportunity to work in a dynamic micro-lending organization. Other student work in social enterprise organizations that promote double- or triple-bottom-line strategies (for-profit or not-for-profit organizations that attend to a financial, social and/or environmental bottom line). Students use their business skills to promote economic development initiatives, assist with feasibility or business planning for a new social enterprise, or guide future growth of an ongoing initiative through capacity building and other strategic activities. Course requirements include orientation sessions in April, readings and writing assignments during the summer, and a power point presentation in the fall semester.

CSC 33933 / THEO 33933 / ILS 35801 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Internship: Latino Leadership Intern Program

Don McNeill

Meets during four times during spring semester 2010 and twice in fall 2010.
Immersion: Eight weeks during summer 2010
This is a leadership internship for fluent Spanish speakers with a commitment to learning and serving in Latino communities. After a series of course meetings in the spring semester, students work 8 weeks during the summer in Chicago with organizations dedicated to empowering local Latino communities. Students will learn and practice leadership skills while deepening their understanding of the issues facing Latino communities. Assignments include readings and reflection on course topics, written assignments during the summer and discussions during the first weeks of the fall semester. Offered in collaboration with the Institute for Latino Studies. Students who have completed the 8- week internship in the summer of 2009 or 2010 should register for this course in the fall of 2010. Acceptance to this course is based on application and interview of candidates.

CSC 33936 / THEO 33936 / CST 33936 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Program: Confronting Social Issues

Andrea Smith Shappell / Margaret Pfeil

Immersion: Eight week summer service-learning placements
This three-credit hour service-learning course takes place before, during, and after student participation in eight-week summer service experiences sponsored by the Center for Social Concerns and the Alumni Association. Students in the course reflect on the meaning and dynamics of Christian service, compassion and Catholic social teaching through readings and writing, along with discussions with site supervisors, and facilitated group discussions upon return to campus. Writing assignments include 16 journal entries and a synthesis paper. The course is completed during the first four weeks of the fall semester and is graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory.

CSC 33938 / THEO 33938 / CST 33938 (CBL)
Summer Service Learning Program: International

Rachel Tomas Morgan
Credit Hours: 3
Prerequisites: THEO 33970

Application required — Eight week summer immersion
This course and internship is synonymous with the Center for Social Concerns International Summer Service Learning Program (ISSLP). The course seeks to challenge students who have domestic service-learning experiences to encounter international realities, and to provide them the opportunity to work with persons and grass roots groups working to address the needs of the poor internationally. The learning goals of the course are to gain and understanding of the multidimensionality of poverty in the developing world; analyze root causes, and identify strategies for social development (poverty alleviation); to gain an understanding of international social issues in light of Catholic social teaching; and to strengthen cross-cultural competencies. Academic requirements include a journal, reading and writing assignments during the summer months, a re-entry weekend retreat, four re-entry classes meeting on Thursdays 6:30-7:45 p.m. in September and October, and a final paper/project.

CSC 33950 / THEO 33950 / CST 33950 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Appalachia

Connie Mick

One week immersion required


This seminar involves experiential learning during the semester break. The course is centered on a service-learning immersion in the region of Appalachia and provides preparation for and follow-up to that experience. Students may focus on particular themes (e.g., rural health care, environmental issues) at various sites while learning about the region and rural issues.

CSC 33951 / THEO 33951 / CST 33951 (CBL)
Social Concerns Seminar: Washington, D.C.

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This course centers on a trip to Washington, D.C. over spring break during which time students analyze a significant social issue through contact with various agencies, government offices, and church organizations. Students participate in preparation and follow-up sessions. Themes (e.g., Educational Reform, Violence in America) vary each year.

CSC 33959 / THEO 33959 (CBL)
Latino Community Organizing Against Violence Seminar

Cynthia Toms Smedley

The Latino Community Organizing Against Violence Seminar explores the rich cultural heritage of Chicago's ethnic neighborhoods and immigrant traditions while examining the corresponding problems of urban life and racism. The Seminar’s focus is a week-long immersion (during fall break) in Chicago that involves dialogue with various community groups, participation in ethnic activities, and academic reflection.

CSC 33961 / THEO 33961 (EL)
Discernment Seminar

Mike Hebbeler

This seminar focuses on senior students discerning and envisioning the integration of faith/theology and social concerns into their lives beyond Notre Dame.


Course Objectives:

  • To provide senior level students the space to reflect on their undergraduate experience and postgraduate plans with one another through small-group discussion
  • To provide students the opportunity to explore their respective vocations through narrative theology, spiritual direction, literature, music and art

CSC 33962 / THEO 33962 (CBL)
Gospel of Life Seminar

Cynthia Toms Smedley

The goal of the Gospel of Life Seminar is to provide students with the opportunity to read and reflect and on a variety of life issues through experiential learning. Exploration begins in the orientation classes where students will become familiar with the issues through reading Roman Catholic Church documents such as The Gospel of Life and by meeting people who work on life-related issues. During the week in Washington, D.C., seminar participants will meet with representatives from the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, elected officials, advocacy groups, legal professionals, and bio ethicists whose work involves life-related concerns. The follow-up classes facilitate analysis and synthesis of insights gained during the week of experiential learning.

CSC 33966 (EL)
Border Issues Seminar

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This seminar will expose students to diverse perspectives about México-U.S. border and immigration issues. During the fall break students will travel to the Southern Arizona borderlands and will attend legal proceedings focused on immigration, participate in humanitarian service efforts for migrants, hear religious leaders discuss their current and past border ministry work, and travel through the desert and ports of entry assuming that security is not an issue.

CSC 33985 (CBL)
Energy Policy, Environment, & Social Change Seminar

Cynthia Toms Smedley

This course will introduce students to the scientific, environmental, economic, geopolitical, and social implications of current energy technologies through selected readings, writing assignments, class lectures and discussions, and a week-long immersion in Washington, DC. Students will learn to assess the strengths and weaknesses of alternative energy technologies (wind, solar, geothermal, fuel cells, ethanol, improving fossil fuel utilization, etc.), and of the various policies and economics surrounding energy. During the week in Washington, D.C. students will identify the limitations of current energy policies and environmental regulation through visits to industry lobbying groups, policy makers and government officials, environmental organizations, and federal regulatory bodies. Finally, students will begin to understand the relationship between energy consumption and environmental ethics, especially as understood in Catholic social tradition.

CSC 34604 / THEO 34605 (CBL/EL)
London Program Internship in Catholic Social Teaching

Cornelius O’Boyle

This semester-long internship brings together practical work experience in campaigning for social justice in some of London poorest inner-city Catholic parishes with a series of tutorials providing an introduction to the social teaching of the Catholic Church. The practical work experience of this internship is arranged through London Citizens, a charitable organization devoted to building community in London’s poorest neighborhoods. London Citizens helps members of the community to identify problems in their neighborhoods, offers them appropriate training to help develop their leadership skills, and organizes city-wide campaigns to unite Londoners in pursuing the common good.

For their tutorials, weekly journals and final research paper, interns are awarded three academic credits through the Theology Department (THEO 34605). These elective credits do not fulfill the Theology requirements, nor do they count towards a major in Theology. Students devote between 10 and 15 hours each week to this unpaid internship. Applications are invited from students of all academic backgrounds.

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INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATIONAL INITIATIVES

EDU 73886 -01 (Dr. Frabutt) (CBR)
EDU 73886 -02 (Dr. Holter) (CBR)
Action Research in Catholic Schools I

Action Research in Catholic Schools I presents concepts, methods, and strategies for conducting classroom-, school-, and parish-based strategic inquiry. Students implement the research plan designed in EDU 73777 (a proposal for self-directed school- or community-based action research in the field), with a specific focus on statement of the research problem, literature review, research design, and data collection. The course is required of Masters of Educational Administration candidates, and open only to those enrolled in this degree program.

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INSTITUTE FOR IRISH STUDIES

IRST 24208 / HIST 34430 / SOC 34123 / ANTH 34320 (CBL)
Introduction to Ireland

ND Keough Center Course: Kevin Whelan

This class focuses on the evolution of Irish culture from the eighteenth century to the contemporary period; It aims to give students a foundational understanding of the cultural inheritance of the island. While organized in broadly chronological terms, it will also examine crucial thematic concerns -- landscape, history, languages, economy, society, politics and government, literature, music, sport. The initiative will allow a select group of participants to be involved in a community-based learning experience integral to the course. The service component is under the co-operative efforts of the instructor of the course, Campus Ministry, and the Center for Social Concerns.


For the community-based component of this course, students will work in local agencies serving troubled youth, refugee youth or the elderly and will integrate these experiences into the course through guided journal assignments. These experiences may also be used as the basis for the final research paper. Interested students should expect to spend significant time in these community placements (2-3 hours per week) and to complete extra reading assignments. Placements will be based on student interest, schedules and organizational needs and will be finalized once the students arrive in Dublin.

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KROC INSTITUTE FOR EDUCATIONAL INITIATIVES

IIPS 30924 / BAUG 30505 (CBL)
Micro-venturing I for Non-Business Students
Melissa Paulsen
This course explores the complex issues associated with microventuring, particularly as a vehicle for economic development, including the fundamentals of finance, marketing, and management through the development of a business plan.


IIPS 50901 / BIOS 50544 / STV 43396 / PHIL 43308 / HESB 43537 / CST 43308 (CBR)
Environmental Justice

Kristin Shrader-Frechette
Credit Hours: 3

Students in this course will study the phenomenon of environmental injustice as it relates to how poor people, minorities, and children are most affected by pollution and usually endure much higher pollution levels. For example, hazardous-waste sites are disproportionately surrounded by black and Latino communities. The course examines some of the scientific ways polluters get away with this injustice and some of the ethical reasons for correcting it. It also shows students how their research and service can help correct it. Main coursework is project based: analyzing ethical or scientific flaws in impact statements, regulations, or policy decisions that disproportionately affect the poor and minorities. Students will work with the communities to analyze their health and environmental materials and obtain a statement of the problem. They will be analyzing draft government impact assessments to show whether they meet the scientific or ethical standards necessary to protect poor people and minorities. Students supply the results of their analyses to the affected communities as well as to legislators. In the past, this research has been used to protect children and poor people in many areas of the U.S. and abroad.

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